13/10/2021
Artist Spotlight
Sioned Bryant
Pumpkin Season | Yayoi Kusama
Pumpkin season is upon us.

Pumpkin season is upon us. Whether it is pumpkin spice lattes, warming and nourishing pumpkin soup or getting festive with funky pumpkin carving, it is truly hard to ignore the enthusiasm for all things pumpkin this time of year. Let’s take a look at the artist whose infamous work was infiltrated by pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama is a contemporary Japanese artist who makes sculptures and installations primarily, however her talents also span across other mediums such as painting, performance, film, fashion, poetry, fiction and other arts. Images and replicas of pumpkins have long infiltrated Kusama’s work. As a young child she suffered hallucinations whereby she would see flashing lights, flowers and pumpkins that became animated and spoke to her. At this point, Kusama began painting, which was likely a psychological response to these visions. The image of pumpkins became ingrained in her practice.  

Pumpkins first featured in Kusama’s works in the 1940s and the images were very much traditional and representative of the Nihonga style (a Japanese style that was developed in the nineteenth century).

In the 1980s, she began incorporating them into her dot motif drawings and paintings. The artist’s defining moment occurred when she created Mirror Room (Pumpkin) and presented it at the Japanese pavilion of the Venice Biennale. The installation consisted of numerous yellow pumpkin sculptures decorated with black spots, placed in a mirrored room to create the illusion of an endless field of pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama, All The Eternal Love I Have For Pumpkins, 1993.

In 1994, Kusama made another pumpkin installation, which was an enormous yellow sculpture dotted with black dots displayed on Naoshima Island in Japan's Seto Inland. Today, this sculpture can be found at the end of the pier at the Benesse Art Site, where it appears suspended over water, starkly contrasted with the gentle horizon and landscape behind it. In August of this year, a typhoon washed this work into the ocean. Benesse Art Site employees were able to retrieve it, although there was some damage to the fibreglass and the sculpture is currently being restored.

Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin, 1994.

The pumpkins are representative of Kusama’s hallucinations and an expression of her attempts to overcome her fears. By externalising her visions and creating amusing and inspiring works of art, Kusama tries to gain control over her feelings and suppress the delusions.

If you are feeling inspired by Kusama and are itching to see her work in the flesh, then you are in luck! Although her pumpkins are not on show, you can find Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Infinity Mirror Room’ on display at the Tate Modern until 12th June 2022.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2021
Artist Spotlight
Sioned Bryant
Pumpkin Season | Yayoi Kusama
Pumpkin season is upon us.

Pumpkin season is upon us. Whether it is pumpkin spice lattes, warming and nourishing pumpkin soup or getting festive with funky pumpkin carving, it is truly hard to ignore the enthusiasm for all things pumpkin this time of year. Let’s take a look at the artist whose infamous work was infiltrated by pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama is a contemporary Japanese artist who makes sculptures and installations primarily, however her talents also span across other mediums such as painting, performance, film, fashion, poetry, fiction and other arts. Images and replicas of pumpkins have long infiltrated Kusama’s work. As a young child she suffered hallucinations whereby she would see flashing lights, flowers and pumpkins that became animated and spoke to her. At this point, Kusama began painting, which was likely a psychological response to these visions. The image of pumpkins became ingrained in her practice.  

Pumpkins first featured in Kusama’s works in the 1940s and the images were very much traditional and representative of the Nihonga style (a Japanese style that was developed in the nineteenth century).

In the 1980s, she began incorporating them into her dot motif drawings and paintings. The artist’s defining moment occurred when she created Mirror Room (Pumpkin) and presented it at the Japanese pavilion of the Venice Biennale. The installation consisted of numerous yellow pumpkin sculptures decorated with black spots, placed in a mirrored room to create the illusion of an endless field of pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama, All The Eternal Love I Have For Pumpkins, 1993.

In 1994, Kusama made another pumpkin installation, which was an enormous yellow sculpture dotted with black dots displayed on Naoshima Island in Japan's Seto Inland. Today, this sculpture can be found at the end of the pier at the Benesse Art Site, where it appears suspended over water, starkly contrasted with the gentle horizon and landscape behind it. In August of this year, a typhoon washed this work into the ocean. Benesse Art Site employees were able to retrieve it, although there was some damage to the fibreglass and the sculpture is currently being restored.

Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin, 1994.

The pumpkins are representative of Kusama’s hallucinations and an expression of her attempts to overcome her fears. By externalising her visions and creating amusing and inspiring works of art, Kusama tries to gain control over her feelings and suppress the delusions.

If you are feeling inspired by Kusama and are itching to see her work in the flesh, then you are in luck! Although her pumpkins are not on show, you can find Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Infinity Mirror Room’ on display at the Tate Modern until 12th June 2022.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2021
Artist Spotlight
Sioned Bryant
Pumpkin Season | Yayoi Kusama
Pumpkin season is upon us.

Pumpkin season is upon us. Whether it is pumpkin spice lattes, warming and nourishing pumpkin soup or getting festive with funky pumpkin carving, it is truly hard to ignore the enthusiasm for all things pumpkin this time of year. Let’s take a look at the artist whose infamous work was infiltrated by pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama is a contemporary Japanese artist who makes sculptures and installations primarily, however her talents also span across other mediums such as painting, performance, film, fashion, poetry, fiction and other arts. Images and replicas of pumpkins have long infiltrated Kusama’s work. As a young child she suffered hallucinations whereby she would see flashing lights, flowers and pumpkins that became animated and spoke to her. At this point, Kusama began painting, which was likely a psychological response to these visions. The image of pumpkins became ingrained in her practice.  

Pumpkins first featured in Kusama’s works in the 1940s and the images were very much traditional and representative of the Nihonga style (a Japanese style that was developed in the nineteenth century).

In the 1980s, she began incorporating them into her dot motif drawings and paintings. The artist’s defining moment occurred when she created Mirror Room (Pumpkin) and presented it at the Japanese pavilion of the Venice Biennale. The installation consisted of numerous yellow pumpkin sculptures decorated with black spots, placed in a mirrored room to create the illusion of an endless field of pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama, All The Eternal Love I Have For Pumpkins, 1993.

In 1994, Kusama made another pumpkin installation, which was an enormous yellow sculpture dotted with black dots displayed on Naoshima Island in Japan's Seto Inland. Today, this sculpture can be found at the end of the pier at the Benesse Art Site, where it appears suspended over water, starkly contrasted with the gentle horizon and landscape behind it. In August of this year, a typhoon washed this work into the ocean. Benesse Art Site employees were able to retrieve it, although there was some damage to the fibreglass and the sculpture is currently being restored.

Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin, 1994.

The pumpkins are representative of Kusama’s hallucinations and an expression of her attempts to overcome her fears. By externalising her visions and creating amusing and inspiring works of art, Kusama tries to gain control over her feelings and suppress the delusions.

If you are feeling inspired by Kusama and are itching to see her work in the flesh, then you are in luck! Although her pumpkins are not on show, you can find Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Infinity Mirror Room’ on display at the Tate Modern until 12th June 2022.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2021
Artist Spotlight
Sioned Bryant
Pumpkin Season | Yayoi Kusama
Pumpkin season is upon us.

Pumpkin season is upon us. Whether it is pumpkin spice lattes, warming and nourishing pumpkin soup or getting festive with funky pumpkin carving, it is truly hard to ignore the enthusiasm for all things pumpkin this time of year. Let’s take a look at the artist whose infamous work was infiltrated by pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama is a contemporary Japanese artist who makes sculptures and installations primarily, however her talents also span across other mediums such as painting, performance, film, fashion, poetry, fiction and other arts. Images and replicas of pumpkins have long infiltrated Kusama’s work. As a young child she suffered hallucinations whereby she would see flashing lights, flowers and pumpkins that became animated and spoke to her. At this point, Kusama began painting, which was likely a psychological response to these visions. The image of pumpkins became ingrained in her practice.  

Pumpkins first featured in Kusama’s works in the 1940s and the images were very much traditional and representative of the Nihonga style (a Japanese style that was developed in the nineteenth century).

In the 1980s, she began incorporating them into her dot motif drawings and paintings. The artist’s defining moment occurred when she created Mirror Room (Pumpkin) and presented it at the Japanese pavilion of the Venice Biennale. The installation consisted of numerous yellow pumpkin sculptures decorated with black spots, placed in a mirrored room to create the illusion of an endless field of pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama, All The Eternal Love I Have For Pumpkins, 1993.

In 1994, Kusama made another pumpkin installation, which was an enormous yellow sculpture dotted with black dots displayed on Naoshima Island in Japan's Seto Inland. Today, this sculpture can be found at the end of the pier at the Benesse Art Site, where it appears suspended over water, starkly contrasted with the gentle horizon and landscape behind it. In August of this year, a typhoon washed this work into the ocean. Benesse Art Site employees were able to retrieve it, although there was some damage to the fibreglass and the sculpture is currently being restored.

Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin, 1994.

The pumpkins are representative of Kusama’s hallucinations and an expression of her attempts to overcome her fears. By externalising her visions and creating amusing and inspiring works of art, Kusama tries to gain control over her feelings and suppress the delusions.

If you are feeling inspired by Kusama and are itching to see her work in the flesh, then you are in luck! Although her pumpkins are not on show, you can find Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Infinity Mirror Room’ on display at the Tate Modern until 12th June 2022.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2021
Artist Spotlight
Sioned Bryant
Pumpkin Season | Yayoi Kusama
Pumpkin season is upon us.

Pumpkin season is upon us. Whether it is pumpkin spice lattes, warming and nourishing pumpkin soup or getting festive with funky pumpkin carving, it is truly hard to ignore the enthusiasm for all things pumpkin this time of year. Let’s take a look at the artist whose infamous work was infiltrated by pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama is a contemporary Japanese artist who makes sculptures and installations primarily, however her talents also span across other mediums such as painting, performance, film, fashion, poetry, fiction and other arts. Images and replicas of pumpkins have long infiltrated Kusama’s work. As a young child she suffered hallucinations whereby she would see flashing lights, flowers and pumpkins that became animated and spoke to her. At this point, Kusama began painting, which was likely a psychological response to these visions. The image of pumpkins became ingrained in her practice.  

Pumpkins first featured in Kusama’s works in the 1940s and the images were very much traditional and representative of the Nihonga style (a Japanese style that was developed in the nineteenth century).

In the 1980s, she began incorporating them into her dot motif drawings and paintings. The artist’s defining moment occurred when she created Mirror Room (Pumpkin) and presented it at the Japanese pavilion of the Venice Biennale. The installation consisted of numerous yellow pumpkin sculptures decorated with black spots, placed in a mirrored room to create the illusion of an endless field of pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama, All The Eternal Love I Have For Pumpkins, 1993.

In 1994, Kusama made another pumpkin installation, which was an enormous yellow sculpture dotted with black dots displayed on Naoshima Island in Japan's Seto Inland. Today, this sculpture can be found at the end of the pier at the Benesse Art Site, where it appears suspended over water, starkly contrasted with the gentle horizon and landscape behind it. In August of this year, a typhoon washed this work into the ocean. Benesse Art Site employees were able to retrieve it, although there was some damage to the fibreglass and the sculpture is currently being restored.

Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin, 1994.

The pumpkins are representative of Kusama’s hallucinations and an expression of her attempts to overcome her fears. By externalising her visions and creating amusing and inspiring works of art, Kusama tries to gain control over her feelings and suppress the delusions.

If you are feeling inspired by Kusama and are itching to see her work in the flesh, then you are in luck! Although her pumpkins are not on show, you can find Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Infinity Mirror Room’ on display at the Tate Modern until 12th June 2022.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2021
Artist Spotlight
Sioned Bryant
Pumpkin Season | Yayoi Kusama

Pumpkin season is upon us. Whether it is pumpkin spice lattes, warming and nourishing pumpkin soup or getting festive with funky pumpkin carving, it is truly hard to ignore the enthusiasm for all things pumpkin this time of year. Let’s take a look at the artist whose infamous work was infiltrated by pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama is a contemporary Japanese artist who makes sculptures and installations primarily, however her talents also span across other mediums such as painting, performance, film, fashion, poetry, fiction and other arts. Images and replicas of pumpkins have long infiltrated Kusama’s work. As a young child she suffered hallucinations whereby she would see flashing lights, flowers and pumpkins that became animated and spoke to her. At this point, Kusama began painting, which was likely a psychological response to these visions. The image of pumpkins became ingrained in her practice.  

Pumpkins first featured in Kusama’s works in the 1940s and the images were very much traditional and representative of the Nihonga style (a Japanese style that was developed in the nineteenth century).

In the 1980s, she began incorporating them into her dot motif drawings and paintings. The artist’s defining moment occurred when she created Mirror Room (Pumpkin) and presented it at the Japanese pavilion of the Venice Biennale. The installation consisted of numerous yellow pumpkin sculptures decorated with black spots, placed in a mirrored room to create the illusion of an endless field of pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama, All The Eternal Love I Have For Pumpkins, 1993.

In 1994, Kusama made another pumpkin installation, which was an enormous yellow sculpture dotted with black dots displayed on Naoshima Island in Japan's Seto Inland. Today, this sculpture can be found at the end of the pier at the Benesse Art Site, where it appears suspended over water, starkly contrasted with the gentle horizon and landscape behind it. In August of this year, a typhoon washed this work into the ocean. Benesse Art Site employees were able to retrieve it, although there was some damage to the fibreglass and the sculpture is currently being restored.

Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin, 1994.

The pumpkins are representative of Kusama’s hallucinations and an expression of her attempts to overcome her fears. By externalising her visions and creating amusing and inspiring works of art, Kusama tries to gain control over her feelings and suppress the delusions.

If you are feeling inspired by Kusama and are itching to see her work in the flesh, then you are in luck! Although her pumpkins are not on show, you can find Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Infinity Mirror Room’ on display at the Tate Modern until 12th June 2022.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2021
Artist Spotlight
Sioned Bryant
Pumpkin Season | Yayoi Kusama
Pumpkin season is upon us.

Pumpkin season is upon us. Whether it is pumpkin spice lattes, warming and nourishing pumpkin soup or getting festive with funky pumpkin carving, it is truly hard to ignore the enthusiasm for all things pumpkin this time of year. Let’s take a look at the artist whose infamous work was infiltrated by pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama is a contemporary Japanese artist who makes sculptures and installations primarily, however her talents also span across other mediums such as painting, performance, film, fashion, poetry, fiction and other arts. Images and replicas of pumpkins have long infiltrated Kusama’s work. As a young child she suffered hallucinations whereby she would see flashing lights, flowers and pumpkins that became animated and spoke to her. At this point, Kusama began painting, which was likely a psychological response to these visions. The image of pumpkins became ingrained in her practice.  

Pumpkins first featured in Kusama’s works in the 1940s and the images were very much traditional and representative of the Nihonga style (a Japanese style that was developed in the nineteenth century).

In the 1980s, she began incorporating them into her dot motif drawings and paintings. The artist’s defining moment occurred when she created Mirror Room (Pumpkin) and presented it at the Japanese pavilion of the Venice Biennale. The installation consisted of numerous yellow pumpkin sculptures decorated with black spots, placed in a mirrored room to create the illusion of an endless field of pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama, All The Eternal Love I Have For Pumpkins, 1993.

In 1994, Kusama made another pumpkin installation, which was an enormous yellow sculpture dotted with black dots displayed on Naoshima Island in Japan's Seto Inland. Today, this sculpture can be found at the end of the pier at the Benesse Art Site, where it appears suspended over water, starkly contrasted with the gentle horizon and landscape behind it. In August of this year, a typhoon washed this work into the ocean. Benesse Art Site employees were able to retrieve it, although there was some damage to the fibreglass and the sculpture is currently being restored.

Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin, 1994.

The pumpkins are representative of Kusama’s hallucinations and an expression of her attempts to overcome her fears. By externalising her visions and creating amusing and inspiring works of art, Kusama tries to gain control over her feelings and suppress the delusions.

If you are feeling inspired by Kusama and are itching to see her work in the flesh, then you are in luck! Although her pumpkins are not on show, you can find Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Infinity Mirror Room’ on display at the Tate Modern until 12th June 2022.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2021
Artist Spotlight
Sioned Bryant
Pumpkin Season | Yayoi Kusama
Pumpkin season is upon us.

Pumpkin season is upon us. Whether it is pumpkin spice lattes, warming and nourishing pumpkin soup or getting festive with funky pumpkin carving, it is truly hard to ignore the enthusiasm for all things pumpkin this time of year. Let’s take a look at the artist whose infamous work was infiltrated by pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama is a contemporary Japanese artist who makes sculptures and installations primarily, however her talents also span across other mediums such as painting, performance, film, fashion, poetry, fiction and other arts. Images and replicas of pumpkins have long infiltrated Kusama’s work. As a young child she suffered hallucinations whereby she would see flashing lights, flowers and pumpkins that became animated and spoke to her. At this point, Kusama began painting, which was likely a psychological response to these visions. The image of pumpkins became ingrained in her practice.  

Pumpkins first featured in Kusama’s works in the 1940s and the images were very much traditional and representative of the Nihonga style (a Japanese style that was developed in the nineteenth century).

In the 1980s, she began incorporating them into her dot motif drawings and paintings. The artist’s defining moment occurred when she created Mirror Room (Pumpkin) and presented it at the Japanese pavilion of the Venice Biennale. The installation consisted of numerous yellow pumpkin sculptures decorated with black spots, placed in a mirrored room to create the illusion of an endless field of pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama, All The Eternal Love I Have For Pumpkins, 1993.

In 1994, Kusama made another pumpkin installation, which was an enormous yellow sculpture dotted with black dots displayed on Naoshima Island in Japan's Seto Inland. Today, this sculpture can be found at the end of the pier at the Benesse Art Site, where it appears suspended over water, starkly contrasted with the gentle horizon and landscape behind it. In August of this year, a typhoon washed this work into the ocean. Benesse Art Site employees were able to retrieve it, although there was some damage to the fibreglass and the sculpture is currently being restored.

Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin, 1994.

The pumpkins are representative of Kusama’s hallucinations and an expression of her attempts to overcome her fears. By externalising her visions and creating amusing and inspiring works of art, Kusama tries to gain control over her feelings and suppress the delusions.

If you are feeling inspired by Kusama and are itching to see her work in the flesh, then you are in luck! Although her pumpkins are not on show, you can find Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Infinity Mirror Room’ on display at the Tate Modern until 12th June 2022.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2021
Artist Spotlight
Sioned Bryant
Pumpkin Season | Yayoi Kusama
Pumpkin season is upon us.

Pumpkin season is upon us. Whether it is pumpkin spice lattes, warming and nourishing pumpkin soup or getting festive with funky pumpkin carving, it is truly hard to ignore the enthusiasm for all things pumpkin this time of year. Let’s take a look at the artist whose infamous work was infiltrated by pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama is a contemporary Japanese artist who makes sculptures and installations primarily, however her talents also span across other mediums such as painting, performance, film, fashion, poetry, fiction and other arts. Images and replicas of pumpkins have long infiltrated Kusama’s work. As a young child she suffered hallucinations whereby she would see flashing lights, flowers and pumpkins that became animated and spoke to her. At this point, Kusama began painting, which was likely a psychological response to these visions. The image of pumpkins became ingrained in her practice.  

Pumpkins first featured in Kusama’s works in the 1940s and the images were very much traditional and representative of the Nihonga style (a Japanese style that was developed in the nineteenth century).

In the 1980s, she began incorporating them into her dot motif drawings and paintings. The artist’s defining moment occurred when she created Mirror Room (Pumpkin) and presented it at the Japanese pavilion of the Venice Biennale. The installation consisted of numerous yellow pumpkin sculptures decorated with black spots, placed in a mirrored room to create the illusion of an endless field of pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama, All The Eternal Love I Have For Pumpkins, 1993.

In 1994, Kusama made another pumpkin installation, which was an enormous yellow sculpture dotted with black dots displayed on Naoshima Island in Japan's Seto Inland. Today, this sculpture can be found at the end of the pier at the Benesse Art Site, where it appears suspended over water, starkly contrasted with the gentle horizon and landscape behind it. In August of this year, a typhoon washed this work into the ocean. Benesse Art Site employees were able to retrieve it, although there was some damage to the fibreglass and the sculpture is currently being restored.

Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin, 1994.

The pumpkins are representative of Kusama’s hallucinations and an expression of her attempts to overcome her fears. By externalising her visions and creating amusing and inspiring works of art, Kusama tries to gain control over her feelings and suppress the delusions.

If you are feeling inspired by Kusama and are itching to see her work in the flesh, then you are in luck! Although her pumpkins are not on show, you can find Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Infinity Mirror Room’ on display at the Tate Modern until 12th June 2022.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2021
Artist Spotlight
Sioned Bryant
Pumpkin Season | Yayoi Kusama
Pumpkin season is upon us.

Pumpkin season is upon us. Whether it is pumpkin spice lattes, warming and nourishing pumpkin soup or getting festive with funky pumpkin carving, it is truly hard to ignore the enthusiasm for all things pumpkin this time of year. Let’s take a look at the artist whose infamous work was infiltrated by pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama is a contemporary Japanese artist who makes sculptures and installations primarily, however her talents also span across other mediums such as painting, performance, film, fashion, poetry, fiction and other arts. Images and replicas of pumpkins have long infiltrated Kusama’s work. As a young child she suffered hallucinations whereby she would see flashing lights, flowers and pumpkins that became animated and spoke to her. At this point, Kusama began painting, which was likely a psychological response to these visions. The image of pumpkins became ingrained in her practice.  

Pumpkins first featured in Kusama’s works in the 1940s and the images were very much traditional and representative of the Nihonga style (a Japanese style that was developed in the nineteenth century).

In the 1980s, she began incorporating them into her dot motif drawings and paintings. The artist’s defining moment occurred when she created Mirror Room (Pumpkin) and presented it at the Japanese pavilion of the Venice Biennale. The installation consisted of numerous yellow pumpkin sculptures decorated with black spots, placed in a mirrored room to create the illusion of an endless field of pumpkins.

Yayoi Kusama, All The Eternal Love I Have For Pumpkins, 1993.

In 1994, Kusama made another pumpkin installation, which was an enormous yellow sculpture dotted with black dots displayed on Naoshima Island in Japan's Seto Inland. Today, this sculpture can be found at the end of the pier at the Benesse Art Site, where it appears suspended over water, starkly contrasted with the gentle horizon and landscape behind it. In August of this year, a typhoon washed this work into the ocean. Benesse Art Site employees were able to retrieve it, although there was some damage to the fibreglass and the sculpture is currently being restored.

Yayoi Kusama, Pumpkin, 1994.

The pumpkins are representative of Kusama’s hallucinations and an expression of her attempts to overcome her fears. By externalising her visions and creating amusing and inspiring works of art, Kusama tries to gain control over her feelings and suppress the delusions.

If you are feeling inspired by Kusama and are itching to see her work in the flesh, then you are in luck! Although her pumpkins are not on show, you can find Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Infinity Mirror Room’ on display at the Tate Modern until 12th June 2022.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
Thanks For Reading
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.