01/09/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Notting Hill Carnival Art 2022
We take a look at two of the emerging talents featured at this year's cultural celebration

It’s finally happened; after a three-year hiatus, Notting Hill Carnival has hit our streets again! The celebration of Caribbean and soundsystem culture filled London air again and the vibrations could be felt across the city. Let’s take a look at some of the emerging talents in this space!

Alvaro Barrington: Wave Your Flags exhibition view, 2019

Alvaro Barrington is a Venezuelan born artist with ethnic roots in Grenada and Haiti. Born to migrant parents, he was raised between the Caribbean and Brooklyn, and his work is characterised by an unwavering commitment to community that never ceases to inform his practice. This was no different in his most recent project where he was given the task of decorating two floats and a stage at the Notting Hill Carnival. 

Barrington’s new paintings that adorned the trucks carried Colours Carnival performers and the Mangrove Mas Band. For the latter truck, the series of landscape paintings are heavily inspired by the Gee’s Bend, Alabama, and crop circles seen from a plane that are distorted to become representations of suns and moons. 

Barrington commissioned architect Sumayya Vally for the design of the architectural pavilion stage, close to where legendary soundsystem crew Disya Jeneration were performing. Barrington ensured that his stage looked the part beside them and drew on inspiration of other iconic sound systems using influence of reggae, dancehall and hip-hop. The end piece was a public pavilion that drew upon the history, legacy and mythologies of carnival. 

Barrington also created works for the 2019 Notting Hill Carnival. If you didn’t get the chance to see his works this year, there is no doubt you will have the opportunity in 2023. 

New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival to be Unveiled in  West London - London Post
Linett Kamala, Brand New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival, 2022. 

Notting Hill Carnival made its debut in 1966, almost 60 years ago, yet not all carnival goers recognise the name Rhaune Laslett. Laslett was a female activist who organised a small children’s street fete back in the 1960s with the intention to ease racial tensions, named ‘Notting Hill Festival’. Who knew that decades later this would have grown into the second biggest street festival that our world has ever known?

Laslett’s message of unity and community has endured decades of political and social change and still rings true in the face of adversity today. Commissioned by Studio West, a mural shines a light on this quiet yet prolific figure in history. The mural is the work of Linett Kamala; Kamala, at the young age of 15, became one of the event’s first female DJs for the static soundsystem Disya Jeneration. 37 years later and she is the manager of this same soundsystem as well as being a Board Director for Notting Hill Carnival. It is no small feat being known as the ‘Soundsystem Queen’, and this mural project celebrates her deep connection to carnival whilst also bringing to the forefront a forgotten name of carnival’s history. The mural ensures to not lose sight of Laslett’s mission over 50 years ago, and Kamala mentors young talent in the community, all of whom had a part to play in the live painting of this work. It is a true representation of the founding moments and voices of the Notting Hill Carnival whilst also a celebration of its contemporary iteration. 

The mural is on view until September 2022 so there is still time to treat your eyes to a true celebration of culture and heritage! 

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/09/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Notting Hill Carnival Art 2022
We take a look at two of the emerging talents featured at this year's cultural celebration

It’s finally happened; after a three-year hiatus, Notting Hill Carnival has hit our streets again! The celebration of Caribbean and soundsystem culture filled London air again and the vibrations could be felt across the city. Let’s take a look at some of the emerging talents in this space!

Alvaro Barrington: Wave Your Flags exhibition view, 2019

Alvaro Barrington is a Venezuelan born artist with ethnic roots in Grenada and Haiti. Born to migrant parents, he was raised between the Caribbean and Brooklyn, and his work is characterised by an unwavering commitment to community that never ceases to inform his practice. This was no different in his most recent project where he was given the task of decorating two floats and a stage at the Notting Hill Carnival. 

Barrington’s new paintings that adorned the trucks carried Colours Carnival performers and the Mangrove Mas Band. For the latter truck, the series of landscape paintings are heavily inspired by the Gee’s Bend, Alabama, and crop circles seen from a plane that are distorted to become representations of suns and moons. 

Barrington commissioned architect Sumayya Vally for the design of the architectural pavilion stage, close to where legendary soundsystem crew Disya Jeneration were performing. Barrington ensured that his stage looked the part beside them and drew on inspiration of other iconic sound systems using influence of reggae, dancehall and hip-hop. The end piece was a public pavilion that drew upon the history, legacy and mythologies of carnival. 

Barrington also created works for the 2019 Notting Hill Carnival. If you didn’t get the chance to see his works this year, there is no doubt you will have the opportunity in 2023. 

New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival to be Unveiled in  West London - London Post
Linett Kamala, Brand New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival, 2022. 

Notting Hill Carnival made its debut in 1966, almost 60 years ago, yet not all carnival goers recognise the name Rhaune Laslett. Laslett was a female activist who organised a small children’s street fete back in the 1960s with the intention to ease racial tensions, named ‘Notting Hill Festival’. Who knew that decades later this would have grown into the second biggest street festival that our world has ever known?

Laslett’s message of unity and community has endured decades of political and social change and still rings true in the face of adversity today. Commissioned by Studio West, a mural shines a light on this quiet yet prolific figure in history. The mural is the work of Linett Kamala; Kamala, at the young age of 15, became one of the event’s first female DJs for the static soundsystem Disya Jeneration. 37 years later and she is the manager of this same soundsystem as well as being a Board Director for Notting Hill Carnival. It is no small feat being known as the ‘Soundsystem Queen’, and this mural project celebrates her deep connection to carnival whilst also bringing to the forefront a forgotten name of carnival’s history. The mural ensures to not lose sight of Laslett’s mission over 50 years ago, and Kamala mentors young talent in the community, all of whom had a part to play in the live painting of this work. It is a true representation of the founding moments and voices of the Notting Hill Carnival whilst also a celebration of its contemporary iteration. 

The mural is on view until September 2022 so there is still time to treat your eyes to a true celebration of culture and heritage! 

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/09/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Notting Hill Carnival Art 2022
We take a look at two of the emerging talents featured at this year's cultural celebration

It’s finally happened; after a three-year hiatus, Notting Hill Carnival has hit our streets again! The celebration of Caribbean and soundsystem culture filled London air again and the vibrations could be felt across the city. Let’s take a look at some of the emerging talents in this space!

Alvaro Barrington: Wave Your Flags exhibition view, 2019

Alvaro Barrington is a Venezuelan born artist with ethnic roots in Grenada and Haiti. Born to migrant parents, he was raised between the Caribbean and Brooklyn, and his work is characterised by an unwavering commitment to community that never ceases to inform his practice. This was no different in his most recent project where he was given the task of decorating two floats and a stage at the Notting Hill Carnival. 

Barrington’s new paintings that adorned the trucks carried Colours Carnival performers and the Mangrove Mas Band. For the latter truck, the series of landscape paintings are heavily inspired by the Gee’s Bend, Alabama, and crop circles seen from a plane that are distorted to become representations of suns and moons. 

Barrington commissioned architect Sumayya Vally for the design of the architectural pavilion stage, close to where legendary soundsystem crew Disya Jeneration were performing. Barrington ensured that his stage looked the part beside them and drew on inspiration of other iconic sound systems using influence of reggae, dancehall and hip-hop. The end piece was a public pavilion that drew upon the history, legacy and mythologies of carnival. 

Barrington also created works for the 2019 Notting Hill Carnival. If you didn’t get the chance to see his works this year, there is no doubt you will have the opportunity in 2023. 

New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival to be Unveiled in  West London - London Post
Linett Kamala, Brand New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival, 2022. 

Notting Hill Carnival made its debut in 1966, almost 60 years ago, yet not all carnival goers recognise the name Rhaune Laslett. Laslett was a female activist who organised a small children’s street fete back in the 1960s with the intention to ease racial tensions, named ‘Notting Hill Festival’. Who knew that decades later this would have grown into the second biggest street festival that our world has ever known?

Laslett’s message of unity and community has endured decades of political and social change and still rings true in the face of adversity today. Commissioned by Studio West, a mural shines a light on this quiet yet prolific figure in history. The mural is the work of Linett Kamala; Kamala, at the young age of 15, became one of the event’s first female DJs for the static soundsystem Disya Jeneration. 37 years later and she is the manager of this same soundsystem as well as being a Board Director for Notting Hill Carnival. It is no small feat being known as the ‘Soundsystem Queen’, and this mural project celebrates her deep connection to carnival whilst also bringing to the forefront a forgotten name of carnival’s history. The mural ensures to not lose sight of Laslett’s mission over 50 years ago, and Kamala mentors young talent in the community, all of whom had a part to play in the live painting of this work. It is a true representation of the founding moments and voices of the Notting Hill Carnival whilst also a celebration of its contemporary iteration. 

The mural is on view until September 2022 so there is still time to treat your eyes to a true celebration of culture and heritage! 

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/09/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Notting Hill Carnival Art 2022
We take a look at two of the emerging talents featured at this year's cultural celebration

It’s finally happened; after a three-year hiatus, Notting Hill Carnival has hit our streets again! The celebration of Caribbean and soundsystem culture filled London air again and the vibrations could be felt across the city. Let’s take a look at some of the emerging talents in this space!

Alvaro Barrington: Wave Your Flags exhibition view, 2019

Alvaro Barrington is a Venezuelan born artist with ethnic roots in Grenada and Haiti. Born to migrant parents, he was raised between the Caribbean and Brooklyn, and his work is characterised by an unwavering commitment to community that never ceases to inform his practice. This was no different in his most recent project where he was given the task of decorating two floats and a stage at the Notting Hill Carnival. 

Barrington’s new paintings that adorned the trucks carried Colours Carnival performers and the Mangrove Mas Band. For the latter truck, the series of landscape paintings are heavily inspired by the Gee’s Bend, Alabama, and crop circles seen from a plane that are distorted to become representations of suns and moons. 

Barrington commissioned architect Sumayya Vally for the design of the architectural pavilion stage, close to where legendary soundsystem crew Disya Jeneration were performing. Barrington ensured that his stage looked the part beside them and drew on inspiration of other iconic sound systems using influence of reggae, dancehall and hip-hop. The end piece was a public pavilion that drew upon the history, legacy and mythologies of carnival. 

Barrington also created works for the 2019 Notting Hill Carnival. If you didn’t get the chance to see his works this year, there is no doubt you will have the opportunity in 2023. 

New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival to be Unveiled in  West London - London Post
Linett Kamala, Brand New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival, 2022. 

Notting Hill Carnival made its debut in 1966, almost 60 years ago, yet not all carnival goers recognise the name Rhaune Laslett. Laslett was a female activist who organised a small children’s street fete back in the 1960s with the intention to ease racial tensions, named ‘Notting Hill Festival’. Who knew that decades later this would have grown into the second biggest street festival that our world has ever known?

Laslett’s message of unity and community has endured decades of political and social change and still rings true in the face of adversity today. Commissioned by Studio West, a mural shines a light on this quiet yet prolific figure in history. The mural is the work of Linett Kamala; Kamala, at the young age of 15, became one of the event’s first female DJs for the static soundsystem Disya Jeneration. 37 years later and she is the manager of this same soundsystem as well as being a Board Director for Notting Hill Carnival. It is no small feat being known as the ‘Soundsystem Queen’, and this mural project celebrates her deep connection to carnival whilst also bringing to the forefront a forgotten name of carnival’s history. The mural ensures to not lose sight of Laslett’s mission over 50 years ago, and Kamala mentors young talent in the community, all of whom had a part to play in the live painting of this work. It is a true representation of the founding moments and voices of the Notting Hill Carnival whilst also a celebration of its contemporary iteration. 

The mural is on view until September 2022 so there is still time to treat your eyes to a true celebration of culture and heritage! 

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/09/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Notting Hill Carnival Art 2022
We take a look at two of the emerging talents featured at this year's cultural celebration

It’s finally happened; after a three-year hiatus, Notting Hill Carnival has hit our streets again! The celebration of Caribbean and soundsystem culture filled London air again and the vibrations could be felt across the city. Let’s take a look at some of the emerging talents in this space!

Alvaro Barrington: Wave Your Flags exhibition view, 2019

Alvaro Barrington is a Venezuelan born artist with ethnic roots in Grenada and Haiti. Born to migrant parents, he was raised between the Caribbean and Brooklyn, and his work is characterised by an unwavering commitment to community that never ceases to inform his practice. This was no different in his most recent project where he was given the task of decorating two floats and a stage at the Notting Hill Carnival. 

Barrington’s new paintings that adorned the trucks carried Colours Carnival performers and the Mangrove Mas Band. For the latter truck, the series of landscape paintings are heavily inspired by the Gee’s Bend, Alabama, and crop circles seen from a plane that are distorted to become representations of suns and moons. 

Barrington commissioned architect Sumayya Vally for the design of the architectural pavilion stage, close to where legendary soundsystem crew Disya Jeneration were performing. Barrington ensured that his stage looked the part beside them and drew on inspiration of other iconic sound systems using influence of reggae, dancehall and hip-hop. The end piece was a public pavilion that drew upon the history, legacy and mythologies of carnival. 

Barrington also created works for the 2019 Notting Hill Carnival. If you didn’t get the chance to see his works this year, there is no doubt you will have the opportunity in 2023. 

New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival to be Unveiled in  West London - London Post
Linett Kamala, Brand New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival, 2022. 

Notting Hill Carnival made its debut in 1966, almost 60 years ago, yet not all carnival goers recognise the name Rhaune Laslett. Laslett was a female activist who organised a small children’s street fete back in the 1960s with the intention to ease racial tensions, named ‘Notting Hill Festival’. Who knew that decades later this would have grown into the second biggest street festival that our world has ever known?

Laslett’s message of unity and community has endured decades of political and social change and still rings true in the face of adversity today. Commissioned by Studio West, a mural shines a light on this quiet yet prolific figure in history. The mural is the work of Linett Kamala; Kamala, at the young age of 15, became one of the event’s first female DJs for the static soundsystem Disya Jeneration. 37 years later and she is the manager of this same soundsystem as well as being a Board Director for Notting Hill Carnival. It is no small feat being known as the ‘Soundsystem Queen’, and this mural project celebrates her deep connection to carnival whilst also bringing to the forefront a forgotten name of carnival’s history. The mural ensures to not lose sight of Laslett’s mission over 50 years ago, and Kamala mentors young talent in the community, all of whom had a part to play in the live painting of this work. It is a true representation of the founding moments and voices of the Notting Hill Carnival whilst also a celebration of its contemporary iteration. 

The mural is on view until September 2022 so there is still time to treat your eyes to a true celebration of culture and heritage! 

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/09/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Notting Hill Carnival Art 2022

It’s finally happened; after a three-year hiatus, Notting Hill Carnival has hit our streets again! The celebration of Caribbean and soundsystem culture filled London air again and the vibrations could be felt across the city. Let’s take a look at some of the emerging talents in this space!

Alvaro Barrington: Wave Your Flags exhibition view, 2019

Alvaro Barrington is a Venezuelan born artist with ethnic roots in Grenada and Haiti. Born to migrant parents, he was raised between the Caribbean and Brooklyn, and his work is characterised by an unwavering commitment to community that never ceases to inform his practice. This was no different in his most recent project where he was given the task of decorating two floats and a stage at the Notting Hill Carnival. 

Barrington’s new paintings that adorned the trucks carried Colours Carnival performers and the Mangrove Mas Band. For the latter truck, the series of landscape paintings are heavily inspired by the Gee’s Bend, Alabama, and crop circles seen from a plane that are distorted to become representations of suns and moons. 

Barrington commissioned architect Sumayya Vally for the design of the architectural pavilion stage, close to where legendary soundsystem crew Disya Jeneration were performing. Barrington ensured that his stage looked the part beside them and drew on inspiration of other iconic sound systems using influence of reggae, dancehall and hip-hop. The end piece was a public pavilion that drew upon the history, legacy and mythologies of carnival. 

Barrington also created works for the 2019 Notting Hill Carnival. If you didn’t get the chance to see his works this year, there is no doubt you will have the opportunity in 2023. 

New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival to be Unveiled in  West London - London Post
Linett Kamala, Brand New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival, 2022. 

Notting Hill Carnival made its debut in 1966, almost 60 years ago, yet not all carnival goers recognise the name Rhaune Laslett. Laslett was a female activist who organised a small children’s street fete back in the 1960s with the intention to ease racial tensions, named ‘Notting Hill Festival’. Who knew that decades later this would have grown into the second biggest street festival that our world has ever known?

Laslett’s message of unity and community has endured decades of political and social change and still rings true in the face of adversity today. Commissioned by Studio West, a mural shines a light on this quiet yet prolific figure in history. The mural is the work of Linett Kamala; Kamala, at the young age of 15, became one of the event’s first female DJs for the static soundsystem Disya Jeneration. 37 years later and she is the manager of this same soundsystem as well as being a Board Director for Notting Hill Carnival. It is no small feat being known as the ‘Soundsystem Queen’, and this mural project celebrates her deep connection to carnival whilst also bringing to the forefront a forgotten name of carnival’s history. The mural ensures to not lose sight of Laslett’s mission over 50 years ago, and Kamala mentors young talent in the community, all of whom had a part to play in the live painting of this work. It is a true representation of the founding moments and voices of the Notting Hill Carnival whilst also a celebration of its contemporary iteration. 

The mural is on view until September 2022 so there is still time to treat your eyes to a true celebration of culture and heritage! 

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/09/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Notting Hill Carnival Art 2022
We take a look at two of the emerging talents featured at this year's cultural celebration

It’s finally happened; after a three-year hiatus, Notting Hill Carnival has hit our streets again! The celebration of Caribbean and soundsystem culture filled London air again and the vibrations could be felt across the city. Let’s take a look at some of the emerging talents in this space!

Alvaro Barrington: Wave Your Flags exhibition view, 2019

Alvaro Barrington is a Venezuelan born artist with ethnic roots in Grenada and Haiti. Born to migrant parents, he was raised between the Caribbean and Brooklyn, and his work is characterised by an unwavering commitment to community that never ceases to inform his practice. This was no different in his most recent project where he was given the task of decorating two floats and a stage at the Notting Hill Carnival. 

Barrington’s new paintings that adorned the trucks carried Colours Carnival performers and the Mangrove Mas Band. For the latter truck, the series of landscape paintings are heavily inspired by the Gee’s Bend, Alabama, and crop circles seen from a plane that are distorted to become representations of suns and moons. 

Barrington commissioned architect Sumayya Vally for the design of the architectural pavilion stage, close to where legendary soundsystem crew Disya Jeneration were performing. Barrington ensured that his stage looked the part beside them and drew on inspiration of other iconic sound systems using influence of reggae, dancehall and hip-hop. The end piece was a public pavilion that drew upon the history, legacy and mythologies of carnival. 

Barrington also created works for the 2019 Notting Hill Carnival. If you didn’t get the chance to see his works this year, there is no doubt you will have the opportunity in 2023. 

New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival to be Unveiled in  West London - London Post
Linett Kamala, Brand New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival, 2022. 

Notting Hill Carnival made its debut in 1966, almost 60 years ago, yet not all carnival goers recognise the name Rhaune Laslett. Laslett was a female activist who organised a small children’s street fete back in the 1960s with the intention to ease racial tensions, named ‘Notting Hill Festival’. Who knew that decades later this would have grown into the second biggest street festival that our world has ever known?

Laslett’s message of unity and community has endured decades of political and social change and still rings true in the face of adversity today. Commissioned by Studio West, a mural shines a light on this quiet yet prolific figure in history. The mural is the work of Linett Kamala; Kamala, at the young age of 15, became one of the event’s first female DJs for the static soundsystem Disya Jeneration. 37 years later and she is the manager of this same soundsystem as well as being a Board Director for Notting Hill Carnival. It is no small feat being known as the ‘Soundsystem Queen’, and this mural project celebrates her deep connection to carnival whilst also bringing to the forefront a forgotten name of carnival’s history. The mural ensures to not lose sight of Laslett’s mission over 50 years ago, and Kamala mentors young talent in the community, all of whom had a part to play in the live painting of this work. It is a true representation of the founding moments and voices of the Notting Hill Carnival whilst also a celebration of its contemporary iteration. 

The mural is on view until September 2022 so there is still time to treat your eyes to a true celebration of culture and heritage! 

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/09/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Notting Hill Carnival Art 2022
We take a look at two of the emerging talents featured at this year's cultural celebration

It’s finally happened; after a three-year hiatus, Notting Hill Carnival has hit our streets again! The celebration of Caribbean and soundsystem culture filled London air again and the vibrations could be felt across the city. Let’s take a look at some of the emerging talents in this space!

Alvaro Barrington: Wave Your Flags exhibition view, 2019

Alvaro Barrington is a Venezuelan born artist with ethnic roots in Grenada and Haiti. Born to migrant parents, he was raised between the Caribbean and Brooklyn, and his work is characterised by an unwavering commitment to community that never ceases to inform his practice. This was no different in his most recent project where he was given the task of decorating two floats and a stage at the Notting Hill Carnival. 

Barrington’s new paintings that adorned the trucks carried Colours Carnival performers and the Mangrove Mas Band. For the latter truck, the series of landscape paintings are heavily inspired by the Gee’s Bend, Alabama, and crop circles seen from a plane that are distorted to become representations of suns and moons. 

Barrington commissioned architect Sumayya Vally for the design of the architectural pavilion stage, close to where legendary soundsystem crew Disya Jeneration were performing. Barrington ensured that his stage looked the part beside them and drew on inspiration of other iconic sound systems using influence of reggae, dancehall and hip-hop. The end piece was a public pavilion that drew upon the history, legacy and mythologies of carnival. 

Barrington also created works for the 2019 Notting Hill Carnival. If you didn’t get the chance to see his works this year, there is no doubt you will have the opportunity in 2023. 

New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival to be Unveiled in  West London - London Post
Linett Kamala, Brand New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival, 2022. 

Notting Hill Carnival made its debut in 1966, almost 60 years ago, yet not all carnival goers recognise the name Rhaune Laslett. Laslett was a female activist who organised a small children’s street fete back in the 1960s with the intention to ease racial tensions, named ‘Notting Hill Festival’. Who knew that decades later this would have grown into the second biggest street festival that our world has ever known?

Laslett’s message of unity and community has endured decades of political and social change and still rings true in the face of adversity today. Commissioned by Studio West, a mural shines a light on this quiet yet prolific figure in history. The mural is the work of Linett Kamala; Kamala, at the young age of 15, became one of the event’s first female DJs for the static soundsystem Disya Jeneration. 37 years later and she is the manager of this same soundsystem as well as being a Board Director for Notting Hill Carnival. It is no small feat being known as the ‘Soundsystem Queen’, and this mural project celebrates her deep connection to carnival whilst also bringing to the forefront a forgotten name of carnival’s history. The mural ensures to not lose sight of Laslett’s mission over 50 years ago, and Kamala mentors young talent in the community, all of whom had a part to play in the live painting of this work. It is a true representation of the founding moments and voices of the Notting Hill Carnival whilst also a celebration of its contemporary iteration. 

The mural is on view until September 2022 so there is still time to treat your eyes to a true celebration of culture and heritage! 

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/09/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Notting Hill Carnival Art 2022
We take a look at two of the emerging talents featured at this year's cultural celebration

It’s finally happened; after a three-year hiatus, Notting Hill Carnival has hit our streets again! The celebration of Caribbean and soundsystem culture filled London air again and the vibrations could be felt across the city. Let’s take a look at some of the emerging talents in this space!

Alvaro Barrington: Wave Your Flags exhibition view, 2019

Alvaro Barrington is a Venezuelan born artist with ethnic roots in Grenada and Haiti. Born to migrant parents, he was raised between the Caribbean and Brooklyn, and his work is characterised by an unwavering commitment to community that never ceases to inform his practice. This was no different in his most recent project where he was given the task of decorating two floats and a stage at the Notting Hill Carnival. 

Barrington’s new paintings that adorned the trucks carried Colours Carnival performers and the Mangrove Mas Band. For the latter truck, the series of landscape paintings are heavily inspired by the Gee’s Bend, Alabama, and crop circles seen from a plane that are distorted to become representations of suns and moons. 

Barrington commissioned architect Sumayya Vally for the design of the architectural pavilion stage, close to where legendary soundsystem crew Disya Jeneration were performing. Barrington ensured that his stage looked the part beside them and drew on inspiration of other iconic sound systems using influence of reggae, dancehall and hip-hop. The end piece was a public pavilion that drew upon the history, legacy and mythologies of carnival. 

Barrington also created works for the 2019 Notting Hill Carnival. If you didn’t get the chance to see his works this year, there is no doubt you will have the opportunity in 2023. 

New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival to be Unveiled in  West London - London Post
Linett Kamala, Brand New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival, 2022. 

Notting Hill Carnival made its debut in 1966, almost 60 years ago, yet not all carnival goers recognise the name Rhaune Laslett. Laslett was a female activist who organised a small children’s street fete back in the 1960s with the intention to ease racial tensions, named ‘Notting Hill Festival’. Who knew that decades later this would have grown into the second biggest street festival that our world has ever known?

Laslett’s message of unity and community has endured decades of political and social change and still rings true in the face of adversity today. Commissioned by Studio West, a mural shines a light on this quiet yet prolific figure in history. The mural is the work of Linett Kamala; Kamala, at the young age of 15, became one of the event’s first female DJs for the static soundsystem Disya Jeneration. 37 years later and she is the manager of this same soundsystem as well as being a Board Director for Notting Hill Carnival. It is no small feat being known as the ‘Soundsystem Queen’, and this mural project celebrates her deep connection to carnival whilst also bringing to the forefront a forgotten name of carnival’s history. The mural ensures to not lose sight of Laslett’s mission over 50 years ago, and Kamala mentors young talent in the community, all of whom had a part to play in the live painting of this work. It is a true representation of the founding moments and voices of the Notting Hill Carnival whilst also a celebration of its contemporary iteration. 

The mural is on view until September 2022 so there is still time to treat your eyes to a true celebration of culture and heritage! 

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/09/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Notting Hill Carnival Art 2022
We take a look at two of the emerging talents featured at this year's cultural celebration

It’s finally happened; after a three-year hiatus, Notting Hill Carnival has hit our streets again! The celebration of Caribbean and soundsystem culture filled London air again and the vibrations could be felt across the city. Let’s take a look at some of the emerging talents in this space!

Alvaro Barrington: Wave Your Flags exhibition view, 2019

Alvaro Barrington is a Venezuelan born artist with ethnic roots in Grenada and Haiti. Born to migrant parents, he was raised between the Caribbean and Brooklyn, and his work is characterised by an unwavering commitment to community that never ceases to inform his practice. This was no different in his most recent project where he was given the task of decorating two floats and a stage at the Notting Hill Carnival. 

Barrington’s new paintings that adorned the trucks carried Colours Carnival performers and the Mangrove Mas Band. For the latter truck, the series of landscape paintings are heavily inspired by the Gee’s Bend, Alabama, and crop circles seen from a plane that are distorted to become representations of suns and moons. 

Barrington commissioned architect Sumayya Vally for the design of the architectural pavilion stage, close to where legendary soundsystem crew Disya Jeneration were performing. Barrington ensured that his stage looked the part beside them and drew on inspiration of other iconic sound systems using influence of reggae, dancehall and hip-hop. The end piece was a public pavilion that drew upon the history, legacy and mythologies of carnival. 

Barrington also created works for the 2019 Notting Hill Carnival. If you didn’t get the chance to see his works this year, there is no doubt you will have the opportunity in 2023. 

New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival to be Unveiled in  West London - London Post
Linett Kamala, Brand New Mural Celebrating Pioneer of Notting Hill Carnival, 2022. 

Notting Hill Carnival made its debut in 1966, almost 60 years ago, yet not all carnival goers recognise the name Rhaune Laslett. Laslett was a female activist who organised a small children’s street fete back in the 1960s with the intention to ease racial tensions, named ‘Notting Hill Festival’. Who knew that decades later this would have grown into the second biggest street festival that our world has ever known?

Laslett’s message of unity and community has endured decades of political and social change and still rings true in the face of adversity today. Commissioned by Studio West, a mural shines a light on this quiet yet prolific figure in history. The mural is the work of Linett Kamala; Kamala, at the young age of 15, became one of the event’s first female DJs for the static soundsystem Disya Jeneration. 37 years later and she is the manager of this same soundsystem as well as being a Board Director for Notting Hill Carnival. It is no small feat being known as the ‘Soundsystem Queen’, and this mural project celebrates her deep connection to carnival whilst also bringing to the forefront a forgotten name of carnival’s history. The mural ensures to not lose sight of Laslett’s mission over 50 years ago, and Kamala mentors young talent in the community, all of whom had a part to play in the live painting of this work. It is a true representation of the founding moments and voices of the Notting Hill Carnival whilst also a celebration of its contemporary iteration. 

The mural is on view until September 2022 so there is still time to treat your eyes to a true celebration of culture and heritage! 

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