13/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Photo London 2022
We take a look at some of the best works, artists and exhibitors showing at the year’s edition of the photography fair.
Odessa, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, 1996 (Courtesy of the artist, Sprüth Magers and David Zwirner)

Hot on the heels of September’s 2021 edition of the art fair, Photo London returns to Somerset House this May! Running over this weekend, the fair is back to spotlight the past, present and future of photography, with over 100 galleries from 18 countries worldwide contributing to this year’s display. Casting a shadow over this international coming-together over art, naturally, are events in Ukraine, to which several of the exhibitors respond in this show; Warsaw’s ILEX Photo is showing work by some of the country’s most exciting contemporary photographers, while David Zwirner and London’s Sprüth Magers are displaying prints by Philip-Lorca diCorcia made in Odessa in the late 1990s, with proceeds going to grassroots charity campaigns to help those affected by the conflict.

The Arrival, Prince Gyasi, 2022 (Courtesy of Nil Gallery)

Other galleries, meanwhile, look to the present and future of photography as an art form, most notably in Paris’ Nil Gallery displaying work by vibrant, Instagram-based photography of Prince Gyasi. One of the major trailblazers in the ‘phoneography’ movement - that is, artistic photography taken through smartphones - Gyasi’s rich, colourful works embody his aim to implement colour therapy in his work, with his dreamlike landscapes employing synaesthetic use of colour to reflect mood rather than reality, and to depict the freedom of younger generations from traditional societal norms of gender, race and sexuality.

Ball Movement, Pool, Maria Svarbova, 2020 (Maria Svarbova and ARTITLEDcontemporary)

Such hyper-stylised aesthetics can also be found in the works of Maria Svarbova, represented here by ARTITLEDcontemporary in Herpen, in which the controlled, symmetrical composition of Robert Yeoman’s collaborations with Wes Anderson meet the muted pastel colour palette of Roy Andersson. These works are presented alongside sweeping vistas and breathtaking landscapes shot by Stephen Wilkes, as well as similarly stylised and varying depictions of Americana by Tom Blachford, Franck Bohbot and Dean West, resulting in a display which is often as surprising as it is varied.

Dave Benett Booth G23 at Photo London 2022 (Courtesy of JD Malat Gallery)

Despite only being the gallery’s second photography display, London’s JD Malat provides one of the most immediately arresting booths at this year’s fair, showcasing some of the most iconic works by celebrity photographer Dave Bennett. The display places an emphasis on Bennett’s work with the London glamour and party scene, featuring portraits of Amy Winehouse, Paris Hilton and two previously-unseen images of Kate Moss, all serving as something of a time capsule for London in the 1990s and 2000s.

LEFT: Dorothy + Hotel du Sud, Paris, France, William Klein, 1960 | RIGHT: Anne St. Marie + Isabella + Mirror, Queensborough bridge, New York, William Klein, 1959

JD Malat’s booth at the fair serves as something of a counterpoint to that of Geneva’s Grob Gallery; here, the most instantly attention-grabbing wall displays the fashion photography of William Klein, immediately recognisable for its depiction of late 50s & early 60s style, despite being shot in such varying locations as Paris, New York and Rome. These far more composed images, when considered alongside the work of Dave Bennett, highlight the evolution of such photography across the decades, from the poised, black-and-white chic to the candid, overexposed digital photography of the paparazzi era.

Grayson Perry - Birling Gap - Land of Hope and Glory, Richard Ansett, 2017

Several exhibitors at this year’s fair also focus on portrait photography of artists themselves; Amsterdam’s Suite 59 Gallery, for instance, displays Andre Villars’ photography of Pablo Picasso, including imagery of the artist in his studio along with behind the scenes photography of him working in Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1955 film Le Mystère Picasso. Just around the corner, meanwhile, Sussex’s Lucy Bell Gallery displays Richard Ansett’s portrait photography of Grayson Perry, with the genre-defying artist posed in exactly the kind of scenes viewers have come to expect, playing with conventions, costume and landscapes in the process. These are displayed alongside the countercultural documentary photography of filmmaker Ken Russell, presenting a unique portrait of British life in the mid-twentieth century.

In your Dreams from the series Last of the Teddy Girls, Ken Russell, 1955 (Ken Russell/Topfoto/ Lucy Bell Gallery)

Showcasing the history and future of photography, this fair is a must-see for London-based art-lovers, and is running until 15th May at Somerset House.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Photo London 2022
We take a look at some of the best works, artists and exhibitors showing at the year’s edition of the photography fair.
Odessa, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, 1996 (Courtesy of the artist, Sprüth Magers and David Zwirner)

Hot on the heels of September’s 2021 edition of the art fair, Photo London returns to Somerset House this May! Running over this weekend, the fair is back to spotlight the past, present and future of photography, with over 100 galleries from 18 countries worldwide contributing to this year’s display. Casting a shadow over this international coming-together over art, naturally, are events in Ukraine, to which several of the exhibitors respond in this show; Warsaw’s ILEX Photo is showing work by some of the country’s most exciting contemporary photographers, while David Zwirner and London’s Sprüth Magers are displaying prints by Philip-Lorca diCorcia made in Odessa in the late 1990s, with proceeds going to grassroots charity campaigns to help those affected by the conflict.

The Arrival, Prince Gyasi, 2022 (Courtesy of Nil Gallery)

Other galleries, meanwhile, look to the present and future of photography as an art form, most notably in Paris’ Nil Gallery displaying work by vibrant, Instagram-based photography of Prince Gyasi. One of the major trailblazers in the ‘phoneography’ movement - that is, artistic photography taken through smartphones - Gyasi’s rich, colourful works embody his aim to implement colour therapy in his work, with his dreamlike landscapes employing synaesthetic use of colour to reflect mood rather than reality, and to depict the freedom of younger generations from traditional societal norms of gender, race and sexuality.

Ball Movement, Pool, Maria Svarbova, 2020 (Maria Svarbova and ARTITLEDcontemporary)

Such hyper-stylised aesthetics can also be found in the works of Maria Svarbova, represented here by ARTITLEDcontemporary in Herpen, in which the controlled, symmetrical composition of Robert Yeoman’s collaborations with Wes Anderson meet the muted pastel colour palette of Roy Andersson. These works are presented alongside sweeping vistas and breathtaking landscapes shot by Stephen Wilkes, as well as similarly stylised and varying depictions of Americana by Tom Blachford, Franck Bohbot and Dean West, resulting in a display which is often as surprising as it is varied.

Dave Benett Booth G23 at Photo London 2022 (Courtesy of JD Malat Gallery)

Despite only being the gallery’s second photography display, London’s JD Malat provides one of the most immediately arresting booths at this year’s fair, showcasing some of the most iconic works by celebrity photographer Dave Bennett. The display places an emphasis on Bennett’s work with the London glamour and party scene, featuring portraits of Amy Winehouse, Paris Hilton and two previously-unseen images of Kate Moss, all serving as something of a time capsule for London in the 1990s and 2000s.

LEFT: Dorothy + Hotel du Sud, Paris, France, William Klein, 1960 | RIGHT: Anne St. Marie + Isabella + Mirror, Queensborough bridge, New York, William Klein, 1959

JD Malat’s booth at the fair serves as something of a counterpoint to that of Geneva’s Grob Gallery; here, the most instantly attention-grabbing wall displays the fashion photography of William Klein, immediately recognisable for its depiction of late 50s & early 60s style, despite being shot in such varying locations as Paris, New York and Rome. These far more composed images, when considered alongside the work of Dave Bennett, highlight the evolution of such photography across the decades, from the poised, black-and-white chic to the candid, overexposed digital photography of the paparazzi era.

Grayson Perry - Birling Gap - Land of Hope and Glory, Richard Ansett, 2017

Several exhibitors at this year’s fair also focus on portrait photography of artists themselves; Amsterdam’s Suite 59 Gallery, for instance, displays Andre Villars’ photography of Pablo Picasso, including imagery of the artist in his studio along with behind the scenes photography of him working in Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1955 film Le Mystère Picasso. Just around the corner, meanwhile, Sussex’s Lucy Bell Gallery displays Richard Ansett’s portrait photography of Grayson Perry, with the genre-defying artist posed in exactly the kind of scenes viewers have come to expect, playing with conventions, costume and landscapes in the process. These are displayed alongside the countercultural documentary photography of filmmaker Ken Russell, presenting a unique portrait of British life in the mid-twentieth century.

In your Dreams from the series Last of the Teddy Girls, Ken Russell, 1955 (Ken Russell/Topfoto/ Lucy Bell Gallery)

Showcasing the history and future of photography, this fair is a must-see for London-based art-lovers, and is running until 15th May at Somerset House.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Photo London 2022
We take a look at some of the best works, artists and exhibitors showing at the year’s edition of the photography fair.
Odessa, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, 1996 (Courtesy of the artist, Sprüth Magers and David Zwirner)

Hot on the heels of September’s 2021 edition of the art fair, Photo London returns to Somerset House this May! Running over this weekend, the fair is back to spotlight the past, present and future of photography, with over 100 galleries from 18 countries worldwide contributing to this year’s display. Casting a shadow over this international coming-together over art, naturally, are events in Ukraine, to which several of the exhibitors respond in this show; Warsaw’s ILEX Photo is showing work by some of the country’s most exciting contemporary photographers, while David Zwirner and London’s Sprüth Magers are displaying prints by Philip-Lorca diCorcia made in Odessa in the late 1990s, with proceeds going to grassroots charity campaigns to help those affected by the conflict.

The Arrival, Prince Gyasi, 2022 (Courtesy of Nil Gallery)

Other galleries, meanwhile, look to the present and future of photography as an art form, most notably in Paris’ Nil Gallery displaying work by vibrant, Instagram-based photography of Prince Gyasi. One of the major trailblazers in the ‘phoneography’ movement - that is, artistic photography taken through smartphones - Gyasi’s rich, colourful works embody his aim to implement colour therapy in his work, with his dreamlike landscapes employing synaesthetic use of colour to reflect mood rather than reality, and to depict the freedom of younger generations from traditional societal norms of gender, race and sexuality.

Ball Movement, Pool, Maria Svarbova, 2020 (Maria Svarbova and ARTITLEDcontemporary)

Such hyper-stylised aesthetics can also be found in the works of Maria Svarbova, represented here by ARTITLEDcontemporary in Herpen, in which the controlled, symmetrical composition of Robert Yeoman’s collaborations with Wes Anderson meet the muted pastel colour palette of Roy Andersson. These works are presented alongside sweeping vistas and breathtaking landscapes shot by Stephen Wilkes, as well as similarly stylised and varying depictions of Americana by Tom Blachford, Franck Bohbot and Dean West, resulting in a display which is often as surprising as it is varied.

Dave Benett Booth G23 at Photo London 2022 (Courtesy of JD Malat Gallery)

Despite only being the gallery’s second photography display, London’s JD Malat provides one of the most immediately arresting booths at this year’s fair, showcasing some of the most iconic works by celebrity photographer Dave Bennett. The display places an emphasis on Bennett’s work with the London glamour and party scene, featuring portraits of Amy Winehouse, Paris Hilton and two previously-unseen images of Kate Moss, all serving as something of a time capsule for London in the 1990s and 2000s.

LEFT: Dorothy + Hotel du Sud, Paris, France, William Klein, 1960 | RIGHT: Anne St. Marie + Isabella + Mirror, Queensborough bridge, New York, William Klein, 1959

JD Malat’s booth at the fair serves as something of a counterpoint to that of Geneva’s Grob Gallery; here, the most instantly attention-grabbing wall displays the fashion photography of William Klein, immediately recognisable for its depiction of late 50s & early 60s style, despite being shot in such varying locations as Paris, New York and Rome. These far more composed images, when considered alongside the work of Dave Bennett, highlight the evolution of such photography across the decades, from the poised, black-and-white chic to the candid, overexposed digital photography of the paparazzi era.

Grayson Perry - Birling Gap - Land of Hope and Glory, Richard Ansett, 2017

Several exhibitors at this year’s fair also focus on portrait photography of artists themselves; Amsterdam’s Suite 59 Gallery, for instance, displays Andre Villars’ photography of Pablo Picasso, including imagery of the artist in his studio along with behind the scenes photography of him working in Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1955 film Le Mystère Picasso. Just around the corner, meanwhile, Sussex’s Lucy Bell Gallery displays Richard Ansett’s portrait photography of Grayson Perry, with the genre-defying artist posed in exactly the kind of scenes viewers have come to expect, playing with conventions, costume and landscapes in the process. These are displayed alongside the countercultural documentary photography of filmmaker Ken Russell, presenting a unique portrait of British life in the mid-twentieth century.

In your Dreams from the series Last of the Teddy Girls, Ken Russell, 1955 (Ken Russell/Topfoto/ Lucy Bell Gallery)

Showcasing the history and future of photography, this fair is a must-see for London-based art-lovers, and is running until 15th May at Somerset House.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Photo London 2022
We take a look at some of the best works, artists and exhibitors showing at the year’s edition of the photography fair.
Odessa, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, 1996 (Courtesy of the artist, Sprüth Magers and David Zwirner)

Hot on the heels of September’s 2021 edition of the art fair, Photo London returns to Somerset House this May! Running over this weekend, the fair is back to spotlight the past, present and future of photography, with over 100 galleries from 18 countries worldwide contributing to this year’s display. Casting a shadow over this international coming-together over art, naturally, are events in Ukraine, to which several of the exhibitors respond in this show; Warsaw’s ILEX Photo is showing work by some of the country’s most exciting contemporary photographers, while David Zwirner and London’s Sprüth Magers are displaying prints by Philip-Lorca diCorcia made in Odessa in the late 1990s, with proceeds going to grassroots charity campaigns to help those affected by the conflict.

The Arrival, Prince Gyasi, 2022 (Courtesy of Nil Gallery)

Other galleries, meanwhile, look to the present and future of photography as an art form, most notably in Paris’ Nil Gallery displaying work by vibrant, Instagram-based photography of Prince Gyasi. One of the major trailblazers in the ‘phoneography’ movement - that is, artistic photography taken through smartphones - Gyasi’s rich, colourful works embody his aim to implement colour therapy in his work, with his dreamlike landscapes employing synaesthetic use of colour to reflect mood rather than reality, and to depict the freedom of younger generations from traditional societal norms of gender, race and sexuality.

Ball Movement, Pool, Maria Svarbova, 2020 (Maria Svarbova and ARTITLEDcontemporary)

Such hyper-stylised aesthetics can also be found in the works of Maria Svarbova, represented here by ARTITLEDcontemporary in Herpen, in which the controlled, symmetrical composition of Robert Yeoman’s collaborations with Wes Anderson meet the muted pastel colour palette of Roy Andersson. These works are presented alongside sweeping vistas and breathtaking landscapes shot by Stephen Wilkes, as well as similarly stylised and varying depictions of Americana by Tom Blachford, Franck Bohbot and Dean West, resulting in a display which is often as surprising as it is varied.

Dave Benett Booth G23 at Photo London 2022 (Courtesy of JD Malat Gallery)

Despite only being the gallery’s second photography display, London’s JD Malat provides one of the most immediately arresting booths at this year’s fair, showcasing some of the most iconic works by celebrity photographer Dave Bennett. The display places an emphasis on Bennett’s work with the London glamour and party scene, featuring portraits of Amy Winehouse, Paris Hilton and two previously-unseen images of Kate Moss, all serving as something of a time capsule for London in the 1990s and 2000s.

LEFT: Dorothy + Hotel du Sud, Paris, France, William Klein, 1960 | RIGHT: Anne St. Marie + Isabella + Mirror, Queensborough bridge, New York, William Klein, 1959

JD Malat’s booth at the fair serves as something of a counterpoint to that of Geneva’s Grob Gallery; here, the most instantly attention-grabbing wall displays the fashion photography of William Klein, immediately recognisable for its depiction of late 50s & early 60s style, despite being shot in such varying locations as Paris, New York and Rome. These far more composed images, when considered alongside the work of Dave Bennett, highlight the evolution of such photography across the decades, from the poised, black-and-white chic to the candid, overexposed digital photography of the paparazzi era.

Grayson Perry - Birling Gap - Land of Hope and Glory, Richard Ansett, 2017

Several exhibitors at this year’s fair also focus on portrait photography of artists themselves; Amsterdam’s Suite 59 Gallery, for instance, displays Andre Villars’ photography of Pablo Picasso, including imagery of the artist in his studio along with behind the scenes photography of him working in Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1955 film Le Mystère Picasso. Just around the corner, meanwhile, Sussex’s Lucy Bell Gallery displays Richard Ansett’s portrait photography of Grayson Perry, with the genre-defying artist posed in exactly the kind of scenes viewers have come to expect, playing with conventions, costume and landscapes in the process. These are displayed alongside the countercultural documentary photography of filmmaker Ken Russell, presenting a unique portrait of British life in the mid-twentieth century.

In your Dreams from the series Last of the Teddy Girls, Ken Russell, 1955 (Ken Russell/Topfoto/ Lucy Bell Gallery)

Showcasing the history and future of photography, this fair is a must-see for London-based art-lovers, and is running until 15th May at Somerset House.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Photo London 2022
We take a look at some of the best works, artists and exhibitors showing at the year’s edition of the photography fair.
Odessa, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, 1996 (Courtesy of the artist, Sprüth Magers and David Zwirner)

Hot on the heels of September’s 2021 edition of the art fair, Photo London returns to Somerset House this May! Running over this weekend, the fair is back to spotlight the past, present and future of photography, with over 100 galleries from 18 countries worldwide contributing to this year’s display. Casting a shadow over this international coming-together over art, naturally, are events in Ukraine, to which several of the exhibitors respond in this show; Warsaw’s ILEX Photo is showing work by some of the country’s most exciting contemporary photographers, while David Zwirner and London’s Sprüth Magers are displaying prints by Philip-Lorca diCorcia made in Odessa in the late 1990s, with proceeds going to grassroots charity campaigns to help those affected by the conflict.

The Arrival, Prince Gyasi, 2022 (Courtesy of Nil Gallery)

Other galleries, meanwhile, look to the present and future of photography as an art form, most notably in Paris’ Nil Gallery displaying work by vibrant, Instagram-based photography of Prince Gyasi. One of the major trailblazers in the ‘phoneography’ movement - that is, artistic photography taken through smartphones - Gyasi’s rich, colourful works embody his aim to implement colour therapy in his work, with his dreamlike landscapes employing synaesthetic use of colour to reflect mood rather than reality, and to depict the freedom of younger generations from traditional societal norms of gender, race and sexuality.

Ball Movement, Pool, Maria Svarbova, 2020 (Maria Svarbova and ARTITLEDcontemporary)

Such hyper-stylised aesthetics can also be found in the works of Maria Svarbova, represented here by ARTITLEDcontemporary in Herpen, in which the controlled, symmetrical composition of Robert Yeoman’s collaborations with Wes Anderson meet the muted pastel colour palette of Roy Andersson. These works are presented alongside sweeping vistas and breathtaking landscapes shot by Stephen Wilkes, as well as similarly stylised and varying depictions of Americana by Tom Blachford, Franck Bohbot and Dean West, resulting in a display which is often as surprising as it is varied.

Dave Benett Booth G23 at Photo London 2022 (Courtesy of JD Malat Gallery)

Despite only being the gallery’s second photography display, London’s JD Malat provides one of the most immediately arresting booths at this year’s fair, showcasing some of the most iconic works by celebrity photographer Dave Bennett. The display places an emphasis on Bennett’s work with the London glamour and party scene, featuring portraits of Amy Winehouse, Paris Hilton and two previously-unseen images of Kate Moss, all serving as something of a time capsule for London in the 1990s and 2000s.

LEFT: Dorothy + Hotel du Sud, Paris, France, William Klein, 1960 | RIGHT: Anne St. Marie + Isabella + Mirror, Queensborough bridge, New York, William Klein, 1959

JD Malat’s booth at the fair serves as something of a counterpoint to that of Geneva’s Grob Gallery; here, the most instantly attention-grabbing wall displays the fashion photography of William Klein, immediately recognisable for its depiction of late 50s & early 60s style, despite being shot in such varying locations as Paris, New York and Rome. These far more composed images, when considered alongside the work of Dave Bennett, highlight the evolution of such photography across the decades, from the poised, black-and-white chic to the candid, overexposed digital photography of the paparazzi era.

Grayson Perry - Birling Gap - Land of Hope and Glory, Richard Ansett, 2017

Several exhibitors at this year’s fair also focus on portrait photography of artists themselves; Amsterdam’s Suite 59 Gallery, for instance, displays Andre Villars’ photography of Pablo Picasso, including imagery of the artist in his studio along with behind the scenes photography of him working in Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1955 film Le Mystère Picasso. Just around the corner, meanwhile, Sussex’s Lucy Bell Gallery displays Richard Ansett’s portrait photography of Grayson Perry, with the genre-defying artist posed in exactly the kind of scenes viewers have come to expect, playing with conventions, costume and landscapes in the process. These are displayed alongside the countercultural documentary photography of filmmaker Ken Russell, presenting a unique portrait of British life in the mid-twentieth century.

In your Dreams from the series Last of the Teddy Girls, Ken Russell, 1955 (Ken Russell/Topfoto/ Lucy Bell Gallery)

Showcasing the history and future of photography, this fair is a must-see for London-based art-lovers, and is running until 15th May at Somerset House.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Photo London 2022
Odessa, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, 1996 (Courtesy of the artist, Sprüth Magers and David Zwirner)

Hot on the heels of September’s 2021 edition of the art fair, Photo London returns to Somerset House this May! Running over this weekend, the fair is back to spotlight the past, present and future of photography, with over 100 galleries from 18 countries worldwide contributing to this year’s display. Casting a shadow over this international coming-together over art, naturally, are events in Ukraine, to which several of the exhibitors respond in this show; Warsaw’s ILEX Photo is showing work by some of the country’s most exciting contemporary photographers, while David Zwirner and London’s Sprüth Magers are displaying prints by Philip-Lorca diCorcia made in Odessa in the late 1990s, with proceeds going to grassroots charity campaigns to help those affected by the conflict.

The Arrival, Prince Gyasi, 2022 (Courtesy of Nil Gallery)

Other galleries, meanwhile, look to the present and future of photography as an art form, most notably in Paris’ Nil Gallery displaying work by vibrant, Instagram-based photography of Prince Gyasi. One of the major trailblazers in the ‘phoneography’ movement - that is, artistic photography taken through smartphones - Gyasi’s rich, colourful works embody his aim to implement colour therapy in his work, with his dreamlike landscapes employing synaesthetic use of colour to reflect mood rather than reality, and to depict the freedom of younger generations from traditional societal norms of gender, race and sexuality.

Ball Movement, Pool, Maria Svarbova, 2020 (Maria Svarbova and ARTITLEDcontemporary)

Such hyper-stylised aesthetics can also be found in the works of Maria Svarbova, represented here by ARTITLEDcontemporary in Herpen, in which the controlled, symmetrical composition of Robert Yeoman’s collaborations with Wes Anderson meet the muted pastel colour palette of Roy Andersson. These works are presented alongside sweeping vistas and breathtaking landscapes shot by Stephen Wilkes, as well as similarly stylised and varying depictions of Americana by Tom Blachford, Franck Bohbot and Dean West, resulting in a display which is often as surprising as it is varied.

Dave Benett Booth G23 at Photo London 2022 (Courtesy of JD Malat Gallery)

Despite only being the gallery’s second photography display, London’s JD Malat provides one of the most immediately arresting booths at this year’s fair, showcasing some of the most iconic works by celebrity photographer Dave Bennett. The display places an emphasis on Bennett’s work with the London glamour and party scene, featuring portraits of Amy Winehouse, Paris Hilton and two previously-unseen images of Kate Moss, all serving as something of a time capsule for London in the 1990s and 2000s.

LEFT: Dorothy + Hotel du Sud, Paris, France, William Klein, 1960 | RIGHT: Anne St. Marie + Isabella + Mirror, Queensborough bridge, New York, William Klein, 1959

JD Malat’s booth at the fair serves as something of a counterpoint to that of Geneva’s Grob Gallery; here, the most instantly attention-grabbing wall displays the fashion photography of William Klein, immediately recognisable for its depiction of late 50s & early 60s style, despite being shot in such varying locations as Paris, New York and Rome. These far more composed images, when considered alongside the work of Dave Bennett, highlight the evolution of such photography across the decades, from the poised, black-and-white chic to the candid, overexposed digital photography of the paparazzi era.

Grayson Perry - Birling Gap - Land of Hope and Glory, Richard Ansett, 2017

Several exhibitors at this year’s fair also focus on portrait photography of artists themselves; Amsterdam’s Suite 59 Gallery, for instance, displays Andre Villars’ photography of Pablo Picasso, including imagery of the artist in his studio along with behind the scenes photography of him working in Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1955 film Le Mystère Picasso. Just around the corner, meanwhile, Sussex’s Lucy Bell Gallery displays Richard Ansett’s portrait photography of Grayson Perry, with the genre-defying artist posed in exactly the kind of scenes viewers have come to expect, playing with conventions, costume and landscapes in the process. These are displayed alongside the countercultural documentary photography of filmmaker Ken Russell, presenting a unique portrait of British life in the mid-twentieth century.

In your Dreams from the series Last of the Teddy Girls, Ken Russell, 1955 (Ken Russell/Topfoto/ Lucy Bell Gallery)

Showcasing the history and future of photography, this fair is a must-see for London-based art-lovers, and is running until 15th May at Somerset House.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Photo London 2022
We take a look at some of the best works, artists and exhibitors showing at the year’s edition of the photography fair.
Odessa, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, 1996 (Courtesy of the artist, Sprüth Magers and David Zwirner)

Hot on the heels of September’s 2021 edition of the art fair, Photo London returns to Somerset House this May! Running over this weekend, the fair is back to spotlight the past, present and future of photography, with over 100 galleries from 18 countries worldwide contributing to this year’s display. Casting a shadow over this international coming-together over art, naturally, are events in Ukraine, to which several of the exhibitors respond in this show; Warsaw’s ILEX Photo is showing work by some of the country’s most exciting contemporary photographers, while David Zwirner and London’s Sprüth Magers are displaying prints by Philip-Lorca diCorcia made in Odessa in the late 1990s, with proceeds going to grassroots charity campaigns to help those affected by the conflict.

The Arrival, Prince Gyasi, 2022 (Courtesy of Nil Gallery)

Other galleries, meanwhile, look to the present and future of photography as an art form, most notably in Paris’ Nil Gallery displaying work by vibrant, Instagram-based photography of Prince Gyasi. One of the major trailblazers in the ‘phoneography’ movement - that is, artistic photography taken through smartphones - Gyasi’s rich, colourful works embody his aim to implement colour therapy in his work, with his dreamlike landscapes employing synaesthetic use of colour to reflect mood rather than reality, and to depict the freedom of younger generations from traditional societal norms of gender, race and sexuality.

Ball Movement, Pool, Maria Svarbova, 2020 (Maria Svarbova and ARTITLEDcontemporary)

Such hyper-stylised aesthetics can also be found in the works of Maria Svarbova, represented here by ARTITLEDcontemporary in Herpen, in which the controlled, symmetrical composition of Robert Yeoman’s collaborations with Wes Anderson meet the muted pastel colour palette of Roy Andersson. These works are presented alongside sweeping vistas and breathtaking landscapes shot by Stephen Wilkes, as well as similarly stylised and varying depictions of Americana by Tom Blachford, Franck Bohbot and Dean West, resulting in a display which is often as surprising as it is varied.

Dave Benett Booth G23 at Photo London 2022 (Courtesy of JD Malat Gallery)

Despite only being the gallery’s second photography display, London’s JD Malat provides one of the most immediately arresting booths at this year’s fair, showcasing some of the most iconic works by celebrity photographer Dave Bennett. The display places an emphasis on Bennett’s work with the London glamour and party scene, featuring portraits of Amy Winehouse, Paris Hilton and two previously-unseen images of Kate Moss, all serving as something of a time capsule for London in the 1990s and 2000s.

LEFT: Dorothy + Hotel du Sud, Paris, France, William Klein, 1960 | RIGHT: Anne St. Marie + Isabella + Mirror, Queensborough bridge, New York, William Klein, 1959

JD Malat’s booth at the fair serves as something of a counterpoint to that of Geneva’s Grob Gallery; here, the most instantly attention-grabbing wall displays the fashion photography of William Klein, immediately recognisable for its depiction of late 50s & early 60s style, despite being shot in such varying locations as Paris, New York and Rome. These far more composed images, when considered alongside the work of Dave Bennett, highlight the evolution of such photography across the decades, from the poised, black-and-white chic to the candid, overexposed digital photography of the paparazzi era.

Grayson Perry - Birling Gap - Land of Hope and Glory, Richard Ansett, 2017

Several exhibitors at this year’s fair also focus on portrait photography of artists themselves; Amsterdam’s Suite 59 Gallery, for instance, displays Andre Villars’ photography of Pablo Picasso, including imagery of the artist in his studio along with behind the scenes photography of him working in Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1955 film Le Mystère Picasso. Just around the corner, meanwhile, Sussex’s Lucy Bell Gallery displays Richard Ansett’s portrait photography of Grayson Perry, with the genre-defying artist posed in exactly the kind of scenes viewers have come to expect, playing with conventions, costume and landscapes in the process. These are displayed alongside the countercultural documentary photography of filmmaker Ken Russell, presenting a unique portrait of British life in the mid-twentieth century.

In your Dreams from the series Last of the Teddy Girls, Ken Russell, 1955 (Ken Russell/Topfoto/ Lucy Bell Gallery)

Showcasing the history and future of photography, this fair is a must-see for London-based art-lovers, and is running until 15th May at Somerset House.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Photo London 2022
We take a look at some of the best works, artists and exhibitors showing at the year’s edition of the photography fair.
Odessa, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, 1996 (Courtesy of the artist, Sprüth Magers and David Zwirner)

Hot on the heels of September’s 2021 edition of the art fair, Photo London returns to Somerset House this May! Running over this weekend, the fair is back to spotlight the past, present and future of photography, with over 100 galleries from 18 countries worldwide contributing to this year’s display. Casting a shadow over this international coming-together over art, naturally, are events in Ukraine, to which several of the exhibitors respond in this show; Warsaw’s ILEX Photo is showing work by some of the country’s most exciting contemporary photographers, while David Zwirner and London’s Sprüth Magers are displaying prints by Philip-Lorca diCorcia made in Odessa in the late 1990s, with proceeds going to grassroots charity campaigns to help those affected by the conflict.

The Arrival, Prince Gyasi, 2022 (Courtesy of Nil Gallery)

Other galleries, meanwhile, look to the present and future of photography as an art form, most notably in Paris’ Nil Gallery displaying work by vibrant, Instagram-based photography of Prince Gyasi. One of the major trailblazers in the ‘phoneography’ movement - that is, artistic photography taken through smartphones - Gyasi’s rich, colourful works embody his aim to implement colour therapy in his work, with his dreamlike landscapes employing synaesthetic use of colour to reflect mood rather than reality, and to depict the freedom of younger generations from traditional societal norms of gender, race and sexuality.

Ball Movement, Pool, Maria Svarbova, 2020 (Maria Svarbova and ARTITLEDcontemporary)

Such hyper-stylised aesthetics can also be found in the works of Maria Svarbova, represented here by ARTITLEDcontemporary in Herpen, in which the controlled, symmetrical composition of Robert Yeoman’s collaborations with Wes Anderson meet the muted pastel colour palette of Roy Andersson. These works are presented alongside sweeping vistas and breathtaking landscapes shot by Stephen Wilkes, as well as similarly stylised and varying depictions of Americana by Tom Blachford, Franck Bohbot and Dean West, resulting in a display which is often as surprising as it is varied.

Dave Benett Booth G23 at Photo London 2022 (Courtesy of JD Malat Gallery)

Despite only being the gallery’s second photography display, London’s JD Malat provides one of the most immediately arresting booths at this year’s fair, showcasing some of the most iconic works by celebrity photographer Dave Bennett. The display places an emphasis on Bennett’s work with the London glamour and party scene, featuring portraits of Amy Winehouse, Paris Hilton and two previously-unseen images of Kate Moss, all serving as something of a time capsule for London in the 1990s and 2000s.

LEFT: Dorothy + Hotel du Sud, Paris, France, William Klein, 1960 | RIGHT: Anne St. Marie + Isabella + Mirror, Queensborough bridge, New York, William Klein, 1959

JD Malat’s booth at the fair serves as something of a counterpoint to that of Geneva’s Grob Gallery; here, the most instantly attention-grabbing wall displays the fashion photography of William Klein, immediately recognisable for its depiction of late 50s & early 60s style, despite being shot in such varying locations as Paris, New York and Rome. These far more composed images, when considered alongside the work of Dave Bennett, highlight the evolution of such photography across the decades, from the poised, black-and-white chic to the candid, overexposed digital photography of the paparazzi era.

Grayson Perry - Birling Gap - Land of Hope and Glory, Richard Ansett, 2017

Several exhibitors at this year’s fair also focus on portrait photography of artists themselves; Amsterdam’s Suite 59 Gallery, for instance, displays Andre Villars’ photography of Pablo Picasso, including imagery of the artist in his studio along with behind the scenes photography of him working in Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1955 film Le Mystère Picasso. Just around the corner, meanwhile, Sussex’s Lucy Bell Gallery displays Richard Ansett’s portrait photography of Grayson Perry, with the genre-defying artist posed in exactly the kind of scenes viewers have come to expect, playing with conventions, costume and landscapes in the process. These are displayed alongside the countercultural documentary photography of filmmaker Ken Russell, presenting a unique portrait of British life in the mid-twentieth century.

In your Dreams from the series Last of the Teddy Girls, Ken Russell, 1955 (Ken Russell/Topfoto/ Lucy Bell Gallery)

Showcasing the history and future of photography, this fair is a must-see for London-based art-lovers, and is running until 15th May at Somerset House.

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13/05/2022
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Adam Wells
Photo London 2022
We take a look at some of the best works, artists and exhibitors showing at the year’s edition of the photography fair.
Odessa, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, 1996 (Courtesy of the artist, Sprüth Magers and David Zwirner)

Hot on the heels of September’s 2021 edition of the art fair, Photo London returns to Somerset House this May! Running over this weekend, the fair is back to spotlight the past, present and future of photography, with over 100 galleries from 18 countries worldwide contributing to this year’s display. Casting a shadow over this international coming-together over art, naturally, are events in Ukraine, to which several of the exhibitors respond in this show; Warsaw’s ILEX Photo is showing work by some of the country’s most exciting contemporary photographers, while David Zwirner and London’s Sprüth Magers are displaying prints by Philip-Lorca diCorcia made in Odessa in the late 1990s, with proceeds going to grassroots charity campaigns to help those affected by the conflict.

The Arrival, Prince Gyasi, 2022 (Courtesy of Nil Gallery)

Other galleries, meanwhile, look to the present and future of photography as an art form, most notably in Paris’ Nil Gallery displaying work by vibrant, Instagram-based photography of Prince Gyasi. One of the major trailblazers in the ‘phoneography’ movement - that is, artistic photography taken through smartphones - Gyasi’s rich, colourful works embody his aim to implement colour therapy in his work, with his dreamlike landscapes employing synaesthetic use of colour to reflect mood rather than reality, and to depict the freedom of younger generations from traditional societal norms of gender, race and sexuality.

Ball Movement, Pool, Maria Svarbova, 2020 (Maria Svarbova and ARTITLEDcontemporary)

Such hyper-stylised aesthetics can also be found in the works of Maria Svarbova, represented here by ARTITLEDcontemporary in Herpen, in which the controlled, symmetrical composition of Robert Yeoman’s collaborations with Wes Anderson meet the muted pastel colour palette of Roy Andersson. These works are presented alongside sweeping vistas and breathtaking landscapes shot by Stephen Wilkes, as well as similarly stylised and varying depictions of Americana by Tom Blachford, Franck Bohbot and Dean West, resulting in a display which is often as surprising as it is varied.

Dave Benett Booth G23 at Photo London 2022 (Courtesy of JD Malat Gallery)

Despite only being the gallery’s second photography display, London’s JD Malat provides one of the most immediately arresting booths at this year’s fair, showcasing some of the most iconic works by celebrity photographer Dave Bennett. The display places an emphasis on Bennett’s work with the London glamour and party scene, featuring portraits of Amy Winehouse, Paris Hilton and two previously-unseen images of Kate Moss, all serving as something of a time capsule for London in the 1990s and 2000s.

LEFT: Dorothy + Hotel du Sud, Paris, France, William Klein, 1960 | RIGHT: Anne St. Marie + Isabella + Mirror, Queensborough bridge, New York, William Klein, 1959

JD Malat’s booth at the fair serves as something of a counterpoint to that of Geneva’s Grob Gallery; here, the most instantly attention-grabbing wall displays the fashion photography of William Klein, immediately recognisable for its depiction of late 50s & early 60s style, despite being shot in such varying locations as Paris, New York and Rome. These far more composed images, when considered alongside the work of Dave Bennett, highlight the evolution of such photography across the decades, from the poised, black-and-white chic to the candid, overexposed digital photography of the paparazzi era.

Grayson Perry - Birling Gap - Land of Hope and Glory, Richard Ansett, 2017

Several exhibitors at this year’s fair also focus on portrait photography of artists themselves; Amsterdam’s Suite 59 Gallery, for instance, displays Andre Villars’ photography of Pablo Picasso, including imagery of the artist in his studio along with behind the scenes photography of him working in Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1955 film Le Mystère Picasso. Just around the corner, meanwhile, Sussex’s Lucy Bell Gallery displays Richard Ansett’s portrait photography of Grayson Perry, with the genre-defying artist posed in exactly the kind of scenes viewers have come to expect, playing with conventions, costume and landscapes in the process. These are displayed alongside the countercultural documentary photography of filmmaker Ken Russell, presenting a unique portrait of British life in the mid-twentieth century.

In your Dreams from the series Last of the Teddy Girls, Ken Russell, 1955 (Ken Russell/Topfoto/ Lucy Bell Gallery)

Showcasing the history and future of photography, this fair is a must-see for London-based art-lovers, and is running until 15th May at Somerset House.

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