01/12/22
Discussion
Shani Haquin Gerade
Three Artworks at the Centre of the Climate Conversation
For our third and final article on COP27, we take a look at the art and artists working in response to the COP27 conference.

COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, not only gathered leaders from all around the world, but it has also provided a platform for artists with the opportunity to showcase art that illustrates climate science and the impact of the climate crisis, with the aim of encouraging the participating leaders towards real action. While some artists' practices are responding to the climate crisis, one artists' studio and collective, Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, decided to present their artwork at COP27 titled 'Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air'. 

At the intersection of art and technology, Invisible Flock is an artist-led, award-winning interactive art studio. Invisible Flock’s practice explores the climate crisis in all its forms; by using highly sensory installations and environments, they challenge us to rethink our emotional relationship with nature.

They dedicate their time to exploring one of the most important issues of our time, as well as the ways in which digital art practices can offer new perspectives and practical solutions, engaging with those often excluded from these conversations.

View of main stage at Cop27’s Health Pavilion, hosted by the World Health Organization. Featuring in the image: central sculpture Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air (2022) by Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, 2022. Photograph: Invisible Flock

In their installation created for the Health Pavilion at COP27, Bodies Joined emphasises the importance of putting health at the centre of these negotiations and how climate change affects it. As stated by Invisible Flock, 'Nature is a biological mirror to the stories and structures of our bodies. The artworks in the Health Pavilion offer global perspectives on the interdependence of human health and the health of our planet. Over 90 per cent of people breathe air that exceeds WHO air quality limits and threatens their health, causing 7 million premature deaths every year. A heating world is seeing mosquitoes spread disease further and faster than ever before. Extreme weather events, land degradation and water scarcity are displacing people and affecting their health.'

Another collective showing their work at the COP27 conference is Studio Molga Ltd, which is a home for the work of artist and designer Kasia Molga, combining creative technologists and architects to develop socially engaged commissions and educational projects. Kasia Molga is a designer, fusionist, artist, environmentalist and creative coder, whose focus is on the intersection of design, science, and technology, and on the stories embedded at these intersections.

The artwork, How to Make an Ocean (2021), is an experience, set in 4 parts, documenting and researching the decision Kasia made in the Autumn of 2019, after losing 3 loved ones, to collect her tears. After the beginning of COVID-19 she “trained herself” to cry in order to relieve her anxiety. The purpose of this study was to determine how human tears could be used to create a healthy small marine ecosystem based on their chemical composition. In addition to healing herself personally, she also provided a constructive way to cope with environmental loss by hosting a sea life with her own tears. Furthermore, Kasia began to investigate how the narrative of her "online life" - news and info feeds curated by algorithms - affects her mental health. As she wondered whether she could use this to cry and feed her mini-oceans, she started to cry. 

The first part of the artwork focuses on the mini ocean collection, with 30 to 50 tiny bottles each containing Kasia's tears and a North Sea algae, with the date, the reason for crying and the name of the hosted algae. There is also a meditation space called the 'Moirologist Bot Experience' that invites visitors to sit quietly and reflect as well as shed a few tears of their own. In the next part, visitors will be able to collect their tears, store them, determine their chemical composition to match them with algae, then mix them with a tiny drop of seawater and algae and place them under the light for a while before closing the tiny bottle. Finally, visitors can participate in a guided meditation led by studio Molga for a group of 10 to 15. 

Kasia Molga how to make an ocean, 2022

The art installation ‘Heaven & Hell in the Anthropocene’, made by Bahia Shehab, was exhibited at COP27 and is designed to inform the audience about the possible futures we face as humans and the consequences of our actions, and how that might affect our attitudes toward the environment. There are two rooms in the installation, each with its own visuals, sounds, smells, and temperatures. One represents "hell" and the other "heaven" to symbolise the possibility of different futures. 

On site at the Green Zone at COP27, Sharm El-Sheik

All these artworks offer an immersive experience, with an emotional impact on people. In closing with optimism, a study conducted last year showed that interactions with art at an earlier COP event (COP21 in Paris) could motivate people to take action, in particular, works that offered messages of hope were most moving. Hopefully, the visitors at COP27 with the power to make change, too, were deeply impacted by these artworks and urged to take positive climate action.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/12/22
Discussion
Shani Haquin Gerade
Three Artworks at the Centre of the Climate Conversation
For our third and final article on COP27, we take a look at the art and artists working in response to the COP27 conference.

COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, not only gathered leaders from all around the world, but it has also provided a platform for artists with the opportunity to showcase art that illustrates climate science and the impact of the climate crisis, with the aim of encouraging the participating leaders towards real action. While some artists' practices are responding to the climate crisis, one artists' studio and collective, Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, decided to present their artwork at COP27 titled 'Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air'. 

At the intersection of art and technology, Invisible Flock is an artist-led, award-winning interactive art studio. Invisible Flock’s practice explores the climate crisis in all its forms; by using highly sensory installations and environments, they challenge us to rethink our emotional relationship with nature.

They dedicate their time to exploring one of the most important issues of our time, as well as the ways in which digital art practices can offer new perspectives and practical solutions, engaging with those often excluded from these conversations.

View of main stage at Cop27’s Health Pavilion, hosted by the World Health Organization. Featuring in the image: central sculpture Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air (2022) by Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, 2022. Photograph: Invisible Flock

In their installation created for the Health Pavilion at COP27, Bodies Joined emphasises the importance of putting health at the centre of these negotiations and how climate change affects it. As stated by Invisible Flock, 'Nature is a biological mirror to the stories and structures of our bodies. The artworks in the Health Pavilion offer global perspectives on the interdependence of human health and the health of our planet. Over 90 per cent of people breathe air that exceeds WHO air quality limits and threatens their health, causing 7 million premature deaths every year. A heating world is seeing mosquitoes spread disease further and faster than ever before. Extreme weather events, land degradation and water scarcity are displacing people and affecting their health.'

Another collective showing their work at the COP27 conference is Studio Molga Ltd, which is a home for the work of artist and designer Kasia Molga, combining creative technologists and architects to develop socially engaged commissions and educational projects. Kasia Molga is a designer, fusionist, artist, environmentalist and creative coder, whose focus is on the intersection of design, science, and technology, and on the stories embedded at these intersections.

The artwork, How to Make an Ocean (2021), is an experience, set in 4 parts, documenting and researching the decision Kasia made in the Autumn of 2019, after losing 3 loved ones, to collect her tears. After the beginning of COVID-19 she “trained herself” to cry in order to relieve her anxiety. The purpose of this study was to determine how human tears could be used to create a healthy small marine ecosystem based on their chemical composition. In addition to healing herself personally, she also provided a constructive way to cope with environmental loss by hosting a sea life with her own tears. Furthermore, Kasia began to investigate how the narrative of her "online life" - news and info feeds curated by algorithms - affects her mental health. As she wondered whether she could use this to cry and feed her mini-oceans, she started to cry. 

The first part of the artwork focuses on the mini ocean collection, with 30 to 50 tiny bottles each containing Kasia's tears and a North Sea algae, with the date, the reason for crying and the name of the hosted algae. There is also a meditation space called the 'Moirologist Bot Experience' that invites visitors to sit quietly and reflect as well as shed a few tears of their own. In the next part, visitors will be able to collect their tears, store them, determine their chemical composition to match them with algae, then mix them with a tiny drop of seawater and algae and place them under the light for a while before closing the tiny bottle. Finally, visitors can participate in a guided meditation led by studio Molga for a group of 10 to 15. 

Kasia Molga how to make an ocean, 2022

The art installation ‘Heaven & Hell in the Anthropocene’, made by Bahia Shehab, was exhibited at COP27 and is designed to inform the audience about the possible futures we face as humans and the consequences of our actions, and how that might affect our attitudes toward the environment. There are two rooms in the installation, each with its own visuals, sounds, smells, and temperatures. One represents "hell" and the other "heaven" to symbolise the possibility of different futures. 

On site at the Green Zone at COP27, Sharm El-Sheik

All these artworks offer an immersive experience, with an emotional impact on people. In closing with optimism, a study conducted last year showed that interactions with art at an earlier COP event (COP21 in Paris) could motivate people to take action, in particular, works that offered messages of hope were most moving. Hopefully, the visitors at COP27 with the power to make change, too, were deeply impacted by these artworks and urged to take positive climate action.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/12/22
Discussion
Shani Haquin Gerade
Three Artworks at the Centre of the Climate Conversation
For our third and final article on COP27, we take a look at the art and artists working in response to the COP27 conference.

COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, not only gathered leaders from all around the world, but it has also provided a platform for artists with the opportunity to showcase art that illustrates climate science and the impact of the climate crisis, with the aim of encouraging the participating leaders towards real action. While some artists' practices are responding to the climate crisis, one artists' studio and collective, Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, decided to present their artwork at COP27 titled 'Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air'. 

At the intersection of art and technology, Invisible Flock is an artist-led, award-winning interactive art studio. Invisible Flock’s practice explores the climate crisis in all its forms; by using highly sensory installations and environments, they challenge us to rethink our emotional relationship with nature.

They dedicate their time to exploring one of the most important issues of our time, as well as the ways in which digital art practices can offer new perspectives and practical solutions, engaging with those often excluded from these conversations.

View of main stage at Cop27’s Health Pavilion, hosted by the World Health Organization. Featuring in the image: central sculpture Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air (2022) by Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, 2022. Photograph: Invisible Flock

In their installation created for the Health Pavilion at COP27, Bodies Joined emphasises the importance of putting health at the centre of these negotiations and how climate change affects it. As stated by Invisible Flock, 'Nature is a biological mirror to the stories and structures of our bodies. The artworks in the Health Pavilion offer global perspectives on the interdependence of human health and the health of our planet. Over 90 per cent of people breathe air that exceeds WHO air quality limits and threatens their health, causing 7 million premature deaths every year. A heating world is seeing mosquitoes spread disease further and faster than ever before. Extreme weather events, land degradation and water scarcity are displacing people and affecting their health.'

Another collective showing their work at the COP27 conference is Studio Molga Ltd, which is a home for the work of artist and designer Kasia Molga, combining creative technologists and architects to develop socially engaged commissions and educational projects. Kasia Molga is a designer, fusionist, artist, environmentalist and creative coder, whose focus is on the intersection of design, science, and technology, and on the stories embedded at these intersections.

The artwork, How to Make an Ocean (2021), is an experience, set in 4 parts, documenting and researching the decision Kasia made in the Autumn of 2019, after losing 3 loved ones, to collect her tears. After the beginning of COVID-19 she “trained herself” to cry in order to relieve her anxiety. The purpose of this study was to determine how human tears could be used to create a healthy small marine ecosystem based on their chemical composition. In addition to healing herself personally, she also provided a constructive way to cope with environmental loss by hosting a sea life with her own tears. Furthermore, Kasia began to investigate how the narrative of her "online life" - news and info feeds curated by algorithms - affects her mental health. As she wondered whether she could use this to cry and feed her mini-oceans, she started to cry. 

The first part of the artwork focuses on the mini ocean collection, with 30 to 50 tiny bottles each containing Kasia's tears and a North Sea algae, with the date, the reason for crying and the name of the hosted algae. There is also a meditation space called the 'Moirologist Bot Experience' that invites visitors to sit quietly and reflect as well as shed a few tears of their own. In the next part, visitors will be able to collect their tears, store them, determine their chemical composition to match them with algae, then mix them with a tiny drop of seawater and algae and place them under the light for a while before closing the tiny bottle. Finally, visitors can participate in a guided meditation led by studio Molga for a group of 10 to 15. 

Kasia Molga how to make an ocean, 2022

The art installation ‘Heaven & Hell in the Anthropocene’, made by Bahia Shehab, was exhibited at COP27 and is designed to inform the audience about the possible futures we face as humans and the consequences of our actions, and how that might affect our attitudes toward the environment. There are two rooms in the installation, each with its own visuals, sounds, smells, and temperatures. One represents "hell" and the other "heaven" to symbolise the possibility of different futures. 

On site at the Green Zone at COP27, Sharm El-Sheik

All these artworks offer an immersive experience, with an emotional impact on people. In closing with optimism, a study conducted last year showed that interactions with art at an earlier COP event (COP21 in Paris) could motivate people to take action, in particular, works that offered messages of hope were most moving. Hopefully, the visitors at COP27 with the power to make change, too, were deeply impacted by these artworks and urged to take positive climate action.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/12/22
Discussion
Shani Haquin Gerade
Three Artworks at the Centre of the Climate Conversation
For our third and final article on COP27, we take a look at the art and artists working in response to the COP27 conference.

COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, not only gathered leaders from all around the world, but it has also provided a platform for artists with the opportunity to showcase art that illustrates climate science and the impact of the climate crisis, with the aim of encouraging the participating leaders towards real action. While some artists' practices are responding to the climate crisis, one artists' studio and collective, Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, decided to present their artwork at COP27 titled 'Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air'. 

At the intersection of art and technology, Invisible Flock is an artist-led, award-winning interactive art studio. Invisible Flock’s practice explores the climate crisis in all its forms; by using highly sensory installations and environments, they challenge us to rethink our emotional relationship with nature.

They dedicate their time to exploring one of the most important issues of our time, as well as the ways in which digital art practices can offer new perspectives and practical solutions, engaging with those often excluded from these conversations.

View of main stage at Cop27’s Health Pavilion, hosted by the World Health Organization. Featuring in the image: central sculpture Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air (2022) by Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, 2022. Photograph: Invisible Flock

In their installation created for the Health Pavilion at COP27, Bodies Joined emphasises the importance of putting health at the centre of these negotiations and how climate change affects it. As stated by Invisible Flock, 'Nature is a biological mirror to the stories and structures of our bodies. The artworks in the Health Pavilion offer global perspectives on the interdependence of human health and the health of our planet. Over 90 per cent of people breathe air that exceeds WHO air quality limits and threatens their health, causing 7 million premature deaths every year. A heating world is seeing mosquitoes spread disease further and faster than ever before. Extreme weather events, land degradation and water scarcity are displacing people and affecting their health.'

Another collective showing their work at the COP27 conference is Studio Molga Ltd, which is a home for the work of artist and designer Kasia Molga, combining creative technologists and architects to develop socially engaged commissions and educational projects. Kasia Molga is a designer, fusionist, artist, environmentalist and creative coder, whose focus is on the intersection of design, science, and technology, and on the stories embedded at these intersections.

The artwork, How to Make an Ocean (2021), is an experience, set in 4 parts, documenting and researching the decision Kasia made in the Autumn of 2019, after losing 3 loved ones, to collect her tears. After the beginning of COVID-19 she “trained herself” to cry in order to relieve her anxiety. The purpose of this study was to determine how human tears could be used to create a healthy small marine ecosystem based on their chemical composition. In addition to healing herself personally, she also provided a constructive way to cope with environmental loss by hosting a sea life with her own tears. Furthermore, Kasia began to investigate how the narrative of her "online life" - news and info feeds curated by algorithms - affects her mental health. As she wondered whether she could use this to cry and feed her mini-oceans, she started to cry. 

The first part of the artwork focuses on the mini ocean collection, with 30 to 50 tiny bottles each containing Kasia's tears and a North Sea algae, with the date, the reason for crying and the name of the hosted algae. There is also a meditation space called the 'Moirologist Bot Experience' that invites visitors to sit quietly and reflect as well as shed a few tears of their own. In the next part, visitors will be able to collect their tears, store them, determine their chemical composition to match them with algae, then mix them with a tiny drop of seawater and algae and place them under the light for a while before closing the tiny bottle. Finally, visitors can participate in a guided meditation led by studio Molga for a group of 10 to 15. 

Kasia Molga how to make an ocean, 2022

The art installation ‘Heaven & Hell in the Anthropocene’, made by Bahia Shehab, was exhibited at COP27 and is designed to inform the audience about the possible futures we face as humans and the consequences of our actions, and how that might affect our attitudes toward the environment. There are two rooms in the installation, each with its own visuals, sounds, smells, and temperatures. One represents "hell" and the other "heaven" to symbolise the possibility of different futures. 

On site at the Green Zone at COP27, Sharm El-Sheik

All these artworks offer an immersive experience, with an emotional impact on people. In closing with optimism, a study conducted last year showed that interactions with art at an earlier COP event (COP21 in Paris) could motivate people to take action, in particular, works that offered messages of hope were most moving. Hopefully, the visitors at COP27 with the power to make change, too, were deeply impacted by these artworks and urged to take positive climate action.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/12/22
Discussion
Shani Haquin Gerade
Three Artworks at the Centre of the Climate Conversation
For our third and final article on COP27, we take a look at the art and artists working in response to the COP27 conference.

COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, not only gathered leaders from all around the world, but it has also provided a platform for artists with the opportunity to showcase art that illustrates climate science and the impact of the climate crisis, with the aim of encouraging the participating leaders towards real action. While some artists' practices are responding to the climate crisis, one artists' studio and collective, Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, decided to present their artwork at COP27 titled 'Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air'. 

At the intersection of art and technology, Invisible Flock is an artist-led, award-winning interactive art studio. Invisible Flock’s practice explores the climate crisis in all its forms; by using highly sensory installations and environments, they challenge us to rethink our emotional relationship with nature.

They dedicate their time to exploring one of the most important issues of our time, as well as the ways in which digital art practices can offer new perspectives and practical solutions, engaging with those often excluded from these conversations.

View of main stage at Cop27’s Health Pavilion, hosted by the World Health Organization. Featuring in the image: central sculpture Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air (2022) by Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, 2022. Photograph: Invisible Flock

In their installation created for the Health Pavilion at COP27, Bodies Joined emphasises the importance of putting health at the centre of these negotiations and how climate change affects it. As stated by Invisible Flock, 'Nature is a biological mirror to the stories and structures of our bodies. The artworks in the Health Pavilion offer global perspectives on the interdependence of human health and the health of our planet. Over 90 per cent of people breathe air that exceeds WHO air quality limits and threatens their health, causing 7 million premature deaths every year. A heating world is seeing mosquitoes spread disease further and faster than ever before. Extreme weather events, land degradation and water scarcity are displacing people and affecting their health.'

Another collective showing their work at the COP27 conference is Studio Molga Ltd, which is a home for the work of artist and designer Kasia Molga, combining creative technologists and architects to develop socially engaged commissions and educational projects. Kasia Molga is a designer, fusionist, artist, environmentalist and creative coder, whose focus is on the intersection of design, science, and technology, and on the stories embedded at these intersections.

The artwork, How to Make an Ocean (2021), is an experience, set in 4 parts, documenting and researching the decision Kasia made in the Autumn of 2019, after losing 3 loved ones, to collect her tears. After the beginning of COVID-19 she “trained herself” to cry in order to relieve her anxiety. The purpose of this study was to determine how human tears could be used to create a healthy small marine ecosystem based on their chemical composition. In addition to healing herself personally, she also provided a constructive way to cope with environmental loss by hosting a sea life with her own tears. Furthermore, Kasia began to investigate how the narrative of her "online life" - news and info feeds curated by algorithms - affects her mental health. As she wondered whether she could use this to cry and feed her mini-oceans, she started to cry. 

The first part of the artwork focuses on the mini ocean collection, with 30 to 50 tiny bottles each containing Kasia's tears and a North Sea algae, with the date, the reason for crying and the name of the hosted algae. There is also a meditation space called the 'Moirologist Bot Experience' that invites visitors to sit quietly and reflect as well as shed a few tears of their own. In the next part, visitors will be able to collect their tears, store them, determine their chemical composition to match them with algae, then mix them with a tiny drop of seawater and algae and place them under the light for a while before closing the tiny bottle. Finally, visitors can participate in a guided meditation led by studio Molga for a group of 10 to 15. 

Kasia Molga how to make an ocean, 2022

The art installation ‘Heaven & Hell in the Anthropocene’, made by Bahia Shehab, was exhibited at COP27 and is designed to inform the audience about the possible futures we face as humans and the consequences of our actions, and how that might affect our attitudes toward the environment. There are two rooms in the installation, each with its own visuals, sounds, smells, and temperatures. One represents "hell" and the other "heaven" to symbolise the possibility of different futures. 

On site at the Green Zone at COP27, Sharm El-Sheik

All these artworks offer an immersive experience, with an emotional impact on people. In closing with optimism, a study conducted last year showed that interactions with art at an earlier COP event (COP21 in Paris) could motivate people to take action, in particular, works that offered messages of hope were most moving. Hopefully, the visitors at COP27 with the power to make change, too, were deeply impacted by these artworks and urged to take positive climate action.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/12/22
Discussion
Shani Haquin Gerade
Three Artworks at the Centre of the Climate Conversation

COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, not only gathered leaders from all around the world, but it has also provided a platform for artists with the opportunity to showcase art that illustrates climate science and the impact of the climate crisis, with the aim of encouraging the participating leaders towards real action. While some artists' practices are responding to the climate crisis, one artists' studio and collective, Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, decided to present their artwork at COP27 titled 'Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air'. 

At the intersection of art and technology, Invisible Flock is an artist-led, award-winning interactive art studio. Invisible Flock’s practice explores the climate crisis in all its forms; by using highly sensory installations and environments, they challenge us to rethink our emotional relationship with nature.

They dedicate their time to exploring one of the most important issues of our time, as well as the ways in which digital art practices can offer new perspectives and practical solutions, engaging with those often excluded from these conversations.

View of main stage at Cop27’s Health Pavilion, hosted by the World Health Organization. Featuring in the image: central sculpture Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air (2022) by Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, 2022. Photograph: Invisible Flock

In their installation created for the Health Pavilion at COP27, Bodies Joined emphasises the importance of putting health at the centre of these negotiations and how climate change affects it. As stated by Invisible Flock, 'Nature is a biological mirror to the stories and structures of our bodies. The artworks in the Health Pavilion offer global perspectives on the interdependence of human health and the health of our planet. Over 90 per cent of people breathe air that exceeds WHO air quality limits and threatens their health, causing 7 million premature deaths every year. A heating world is seeing mosquitoes spread disease further and faster than ever before. Extreme weather events, land degradation and water scarcity are displacing people and affecting their health.'

Another collective showing their work at the COP27 conference is Studio Molga Ltd, which is a home for the work of artist and designer Kasia Molga, combining creative technologists and architects to develop socially engaged commissions and educational projects. Kasia Molga is a designer, fusionist, artist, environmentalist and creative coder, whose focus is on the intersection of design, science, and technology, and on the stories embedded at these intersections.

The artwork, How to Make an Ocean (2021), is an experience, set in 4 parts, documenting and researching the decision Kasia made in the Autumn of 2019, after losing 3 loved ones, to collect her tears. After the beginning of COVID-19 she “trained herself” to cry in order to relieve her anxiety. The purpose of this study was to determine how human tears could be used to create a healthy small marine ecosystem based on their chemical composition. In addition to healing herself personally, she also provided a constructive way to cope with environmental loss by hosting a sea life with her own tears. Furthermore, Kasia began to investigate how the narrative of her "online life" - news and info feeds curated by algorithms - affects her mental health. As she wondered whether she could use this to cry and feed her mini-oceans, she started to cry. 

The first part of the artwork focuses on the mini ocean collection, with 30 to 50 tiny bottles each containing Kasia's tears and a North Sea algae, with the date, the reason for crying and the name of the hosted algae. There is also a meditation space called the 'Moirologist Bot Experience' that invites visitors to sit quietly and reflect as well as shed a few tears of their own. In the next part, visitors will be able to collect their tears, store them, determine their chemical composition to match them with algae, then mix them with a tiny drop of seawater and algae and place them under the light for a while before closing the tiny bottle. Finally, visitors can participate in a guided meditation led by studio Molga for a group of 10 to 15. 

Kasia Molga how to make an ocean, 2022

The art installation ‘Heaven & Hell in the Anthropocene’, made by Bahia Shehab, was exhibited at COP27 and is designed to inform the audience about the possible futures we face as humans and the consequences of our actions, and how that might affect our attitudes toward the environment. There are two rooms in the installation, each with its own visuals, sounds, smells, and temperatures. One represents "hell" and the other "heaven" to symbolise the possibility of different futures. 

On site at the Green Zone at COP27, Sharm El-Sheik

All these artworks offer an immersive experience, with an emotional impact on people. In closing with optimism, a study conducted last year showed that interactions with art at an earlier COP event (COP21 in Paris) could motivate people to take action, in particular, works that offered messages of hope were most moving. Hopefully, the visitors at COP27 with the power to make change, too, were deeply impacted by these artworks and urged to take positive climate action.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/12/22
Discussion
Shani Haquin Gerade
Three Artworks at the Centre of the Climate Conversation
For our third and final article on COP27, we take a look at the art and artists working in response to the COP27 conference.

COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, not only gathered leaders from all around the world, but it has also provided a platform for artists with the opportunity to showcase art that illustrates climate science and the impact of the climate crisis, with the aim of encouraging the participating leaders towards real action. While some artists' practices are responding to the climate crisis, one artists' studio and collective, Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, decided to present their artwork at COP27 titled 'Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air'. 

At the intersection of art and technology, Invisible Flock is an artist-led, award-winning interactive art studio. Invisible Flock’s practice explores the climate crisis in all its forms; by using highly sensory installations and environments, they challenge us to rethink our emotional relationship with nature.

They dedicate their time to exploring one of the most important issues of our time, as well as the ways in which digital art practices can offer new perspectives and practical solutions, engaging with those often excluded from these conversations.

View of main stage at Cop27’s Health Pavilion, hosted by the World Health Organization. Featuring in the image: central sculpture Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air (2022) by Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, 2022. Photograph: Invisible Flock

In their installation created for the Health Pavilion at COP27, Bodies Joined emphasises the importance of putting health at the centre of these negotiations and how climate change affects it. As stated by Invisible Flock, 'Nature is a biological mirror to the stories and structures of our bodies. The artworks in the Health Pavilion offer global perspectives on the interdependence of human health and the health of our planet. Over 90 per cent of people breathe air that exceeds WHO air quality limits and threatens their health, causing 7 million premature deaths every year. A heating world is seeing mosquitoes spread disease further and faster than ever before. Extreme weather events, land degradation and water scarcity are displacing people and affecting their health.'

Another collective showing their work at the COP27 conference is Studio Molga Ltd, which is a home for the work of artist and designer Kasia Molga, combining creative technologists and architects to develop socially engaged commissions and educational projects. Kasia Molga is a designer, fusionist, artist, environmentalist and creative coder, whose focus is on the intersection of design, science, and technology, and on the stories embedded at these intersections.

The artwork, How to Make an Ocean (2021), is an experience, set in 4 parts, documenting and researching the decision Kasia made in the Autumn of 2019, after losing 3 loved ones, to collect her tears. After the beginning of COVID-19 she “trained herself” to cry in order to relieve her anxiety. The purpose of this study was to determine how human tears could be used to create a healthy small marine ecosystem based on their chemical composition. In addition to healing herself personally, she also provided a constructive way to cope with environmental loss by hosting a sea life with her own tears. Furthermore, Kasia began to investigate how the narrative of her "online life" - news and info feeds curated by algorithms - affects her mental health. As she wondered whether she could use this to cry and feed her mini-oceans, she started to cry. 

The first part of the artwork focuses on the mini ocean collection, with 30 to 50 tiny bottles each containing Kasia's tears and a North Sea algae, with the date, the reason for crying and the name of the hosted algae. There is also a meditation space called the 'Moirologist Bot Experience' that invites visitors to sit quietly and reflect as well as shed a few tears of their own. In the next part, visitors will be able to collect their tears, store them, determine their chemical composition to match them with algae, then mix them with a tiny drop of seawater and algae and place them under the light for a while before closing the tiny bottle. Finally, visitors can participate in a guided meditation led by studio Molga for a group of 10 to 15. 

Kasia Molga how to make an ocean, 2022

The art installation ‘Heaven & Hell in the Anthropocene’, made by Bahia Shehab, was exhibited at COP27 and is designed to inform the audience about the possible futures we face as humans and the consequences of our actions, and how that might affect our attitudes toward the environment. There are two rooms in the installation, each with its own visuals, sounds, smells, and temperatures. One represents "hell" and the other "heaven" to symbolise the possibility of different futures. 

On site at the Green Zone at COP27, Sharm El-Sheik

All these artworks offer an immersive experience, with an emotional impact on people. In closing with optimism, a study conducted last year showed that interactions with art at an earlier COP event (COP21 in Paris) could motivate people to take action, in particular, works that offered messages of hope were most moving. Hopefully, the visitors at COP27 with the power to make change, too, were deeply impacted by these artworks and urged to take positive climate action.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/12/22
Discussion
Shani Haquin Gerade
Three Artworks at the Centre of the Climate Conversation
For our third and final article on COP27, we take a look at the art and artists working in response to the COP27 conference.

COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, not only gathered leaders from all around the world, but it has also provided a platform for artists with the opportunity to showcase art that illustrates climate science and the impact of the climate crisis, with the aim of encouraging the participating leaders towards real action. While some artists' practices are responding to the climate crisis, one artists' studio and collective, Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, decided to present their artwork at COP27 titled 'Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air'. 

At the intersection of art and technology, Invisible Flock is an artist-led, award-winning interactive art studio. Invisible Flock’s practice explores the climate crisis in all its forms; by using highly sensory installations and environments, they challenge us to rethink our emotional relationship with nature.

They dedicate their time to exploring one of the most important issues of our time, as well as the ways in which digital art practices can offer new perspectives and practical solutions, engaging with those often excluded from these conversations.

View of main stage at Cop27’s Health Pavilion, hosted by the World Health Organization. Featuring in the image: central sculpture Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air (2022) by Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, 2022. Photograph: Invisible Flock

In their installation created for the Health Pavilion at COP27, Bodies Joined emphasises the importance of putting health at the centre of these negotiations and how climate change affects it. As stated by Invisible Flock, 'Nature is a biological mirror to the stories and structures of our bodies. The artworks in the Health Pavilion offer global perspectives on the interdependence of human health and the health of our planet. Over 90 per cent of people breathe air that exceeds WHO air quality limits and threatens their health, causing 7 million premature deaths every year. A heating world is seeing mosquitoes spread disease further and faster than ever before. Extreme weather events, land degradation and water scarcity are displacing people and affecting their health.'

Another collective showing their work at the COP27 conference is Studio Molga Ltd, which is a home for the work of artist and designer Kasia Molga, combining creative technologists and architects to develop socially engaged commissions and educational projects. Kasia Molga is a designer, fusionist, artist, environmentalist and creative coder, whose focus is on the intersection of design, science, and technology, and on the stories embedded at these intersections.

The artwork, How to Make an Ocean (2021), is an experience, set in 4 parts, documenting and researching the decision Kasia made in the Autumn of 2019, after losing 3 loved ones, to collect her tears. After the beginning of COVID-19 she “trained herself” to cry in order to relieve her anxiety. The purpose of this study was to determine how human tears could be used to create a healthy small marine ecosystem based on their chemical composition. In addition to healing herself personally, she also provided a constructive way to cope with environmental loss by hosting a sea life with her own tears. Furthermore, Kasia began to investigate how the narrative of her "online life" - news and info feeds curated by algorithms - affects her mental health. As she wondered whether she could use this to cry and feed her mini-oceans, she started to cry. 

The first part of the artwork focuses on the mini ocean collection, with 30 to 50 tiny bottles each containing Kasia's tears and a North Sea algae, with the date, the reason for crying and the name of the hosted algae. There is also a meditation space called the 'Moirologist Bot Experience' that invites visitors to sit quietly and reflect as well as shed a few tears of their own. In the next part, visitors will be able to collect their tears, store them, determine their chemical composition to match them with algae, then mix them with a tiny drop of seawater and algae and place them under the light for a while before closing the tiny bottle. Finally, visitors can participate in a guided meditation led by studio Molga for a group of 10 to 15. 

Kasia Molga how to make an ocean, 2022

The art installation ‘Heaven & Hell in the Anthropocene’, made by Bahia Shehab, was exhibited at COP27 and is designed to inform the audience about the possible futures we face as humans and the consequences of our actions, and how that might affect our attitudes toward the environment. There are two rooms in the installation, each with its own visuals, sounds, smells, and temperatures. One represents "hell" and the other "heaven" to symbolise the possibility of different futures. 

On site at the Green Zone at COP27, Sharm El-Sheik

All these artworks offer an immersive experience, with an emotional impact on people. In closing with optimism, a study conducted last year showed that interactions with art at an earlier COP event (COP21 in Paris) could motivate people to take action, in particular, works that offered messages of hope were most moving. Hopefully, the visitors at COP27 with the power to make change, too, were deeply impacted by these artworks and urged to take positive climate action.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/12/22
Discussion
Shani Haquin Gerade
Three Artworks at the Centre of the Climate Conversation
For our third and final article on COP27, we take a look at the art and artists working in response to the COP27 conference.

COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, not only gathered leaders from all around the world, but it has also provided a platform for artists with the opportunity to showcase art that illustrates climate science and the impact of the climate crisis, with the aim of encouraging the participating leaders towards real action. While some artists' practices are responding to the climate crisis, one artists' studio and collective, Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, decided to present their artwork at COP27 titled 'Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air'. 

At the intersection of art and technology, Invisible Flock is an artist-led, award-winning interactive art studio. Invisible Flock’s practice explores the climate crisis in all its forms; by using highly sensory installations and environments, they challenge us to rethink our emotional relationship with nature.

They dedicate their time to exploring one of the most important issues of our time, as well as the ways in which digital art practices can offer new perspectives and practical solutions, engaging with those often excluded from these conversations.

View of main stage at Cop27’s Health Pavilion, hosted by the World Health Organization. Featuring in the image: central sculpture Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air (2022) by Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, 2022. Photograph: Invisible Flock

In their installation created for the Health Pavilion at COP27, Bodies Joined emphasises the importance of putting health at the centre of these negotiations and how climate change affects it. As stated by Invisible Flock, 'Nature is a biological mirror to the stories and structures of our bodies. The artworks in the Health Pavilion offer global perspectives on the interdependence of human health and the health of our planet. Over 90 per cent of people breathe air that exceeds WHO air quality limits and threatens their health, causing 7 million premature deaths every year. A heating world is seeing mosquitoes spread disease further and faster than ever before. Extreme weather events, land degradation and water scarcity are displacing people and affecting their health.'

Another collective showing their work at the COP27 conference is Studio Molga Ltd, which is a home for the work of artist and designer Kasia Molga, combining creative technologists and architects to develop socially engaged commissions and educational projects. Kasia Molga is a designer, fusionist, artist, environmentalist and creative coder, whose focus is on the intersection of design, science, and technology, and on the stories embedded at these intersections.

The artwork, How to Make an Ocean (2021), is an experience, set in 4 parts, documenting and researching the decision Kasia made in the Autumn of 2019, after losing 3 loved ones, to collect her tears. After the beginning of COVID-19 she “trained herself” to cry in order to relieve her anxiety. The purpose of this study was to determine how human tears could be used to create a healthy small marine ecosystem based on their chemical composition. In addition to healing herself personally, she also provided a constructive way to cope with environmental loss by hosting a sea life with her own tears. Furthermore, Kasia began to investigate how the narrative of her "online life" - news and info feeds curated by algorithms - affects her mental health. As she wondered whether she could use this to cry and feed her mini-oceans, she started to cry. 

The first part of the artwork focuses on the mini ocean collection, with 30 to 50 tiny bottles each containing Kasia's tears and a North Sea algae, with the date, the reason for crying and the name of the hosted algae. There is also a meditation space called the 'Moirologist Bot Experience' that invites visitors to sit quietly and reflect as well as shed a few tears of their own. In the next part, visitors will be able to collect their tears, store them, determine their chemical composition to match them with algae, then mix them with a tiny drop of seawater and algae and place them under the light for a while before closing the tiny bottle. Finally, visitors can participate in a guided meditation led by studio Molga for a group of 10 to 15. 

Kasia Molga how to make an ocean, 2022

The art installation ‘Heaven & Hell in the Anthropocene’, made by Bahia Shehab, was exhibited at COP27 and is designed to inform the audience about the possible futures we face as humans and the consequences of our actions, and how that might affect our attitudes toward the environment. There are two rooms in the installation, each with its own visuals, sounds, smells, and temperatures. One represents "hell" and the other "heaven" to symbolise the possibility of different futures. 

On site at the Green Zone at COP27, Sharm El-Sheik

All these artworks offer an immersive experience, with an emotional impact on people. In closing with optimism, a study conducted last year showed that interactions with art at an earlier COP event (COP21 in Paris) could motivate people to take action, in particular, works that offered messages of hope were most moving. Hopefully, the visitors at COP27 with the power to make change, too, were deeply impacted by these artworks and urged to take positive climate action.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/12/22
Discussion
Shani Haquin Gerade
Three Artworks at the Centre of the Climate Conversation
For our third and final article on COP27, we take a look at the art and artists working in response to the COP27 conference.

COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, not only gathered leaders from all around the world, but it has also provided a platform for artists with the opportunity to showcase art that illustrates climate science and the impact of the climate crisis, with the aim of encouraging the participating leaders towards real action. While some artists' practices are responding to the climate crisis, one artists' studio and collective, Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, decided to present their artwork at COP27 titled 'Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air'. 

At the intersection of art and technology, Invisible Flock is an artist-led, award-winning interactive art studio. Invisible Flock’s practice explores the climate crisis in all its forms; by using highly sensory installations and environments, they challenge us to rethink our emotional relationship with nature.

They dedicate their time to exploring one of the most important issues of our time, as well as the ways in which digital art practices can offer new perspectives and practical solutions, engaging with those often excluded from these conversations.

View of main stage at Cop27’s Health Pavilion, hosted by the World Health Organization. Featuring in the image: central sculpture Bodies Joined by a Molecule of Air (2022) by Invisible Flock and Jon Bausor, 2022. Photograph: Invisible Flock

In their installation created for the Health Pavilion at COP27, Bodies Joined emphasises the importance of putting health at the centre of these negotiations and how climate change affects it. As stated by Invisible Flock, 'Nature is a biological mirror to the stories and structures of our bodies. The artworks in the Health Pavilion offer global perspectives on the interdependence of human health and the health of our planet. Over 90 per cent of people breathe air that exceeds WHO air quality limits and threatens their health, causing 7 million premature deaths every year. A heating world is seeing mosquitoes spread disease further and faster than ever before. Extreme weather events, land degradation and water scarcity are displacing people and affecting their health.'

Another collective showing their work at the COP27 conference is Studio Molga Ltd, which is a home for the work of artist and designer Kasia Molga, combining creative technologists and architects to develop socially engaged commissions and educational projects. Kasia Molga is a designer, fusionist, artist, environmentalist and creative coder, whose focus is on the intersection of design, science, and technology, and on the stories embedded at these intersections.

The artwork, How to Make an Ocean (2021), is an experience, set in 4 parts, documenting and researching the decision Kasia made in the Autumn of 2019, after losing 3 loved ones, to collect her tears. After the beginning of COVID-19 she “trained herself” to cry in order to relieve her anxiety. The purpose of this study was to determine how human tears could be used to create a healthy small marine ecosystem based on their chemical composition. In addition to healing herself personally, she also provided a constructive way to cope with environmental loss by hosting a sea life with her own tears. Furthermore, Kasia began to investigate how the narrative of her "online life" - news and info feeds curated by algorithms - affects her mental health. As she wondered whether she could use this to cry and feed her mini-oceans, she started to cry. 

The first part of the artwork focuses on the mini ocean collection, with 30 to 50 tiny bottles each containing Kasia's tears and a North Sea algae, with the date, the reason for crying and the name of the hosted algae. There is also a meditation space called the 'Moirologist Bot Experience' that invites visitors to sit quietly and reflect as well as shed a few tears of their own. In the next part, visitors will be able to collect their tears, store them, determine their chemical composition to match them with algae, then mix them with a tiny drop of seawater and algae and place them under the light for a while before closing the tiny bottle. Finally, visitors can participate in a guided meditation led by studio Molga for a group of 10 to 15. 

Kasia Molga how to make an ocean, 2022

The art installation ‘Heaven & Hell in the Anthropocene’, made by Bahia Shehab, was exhibited at COP27 and is designed to inform the audience about the possible futures we face as humans and the consequences of our actions, and how that might affect our attitudes toward the environment. There are two rooms in the installation, each with its own visuals, sounds, smells, and temperatures. One represents "hell" and the other "heaven" to symbolise the possibility of different futures. 

On site at the Green Zone at COP27, Sharm El-Sheik

All these artworks offer an immersive experience, with an emotional impact on people. In closing with optimism, a study conducted last year showed that interactions with art at an earlier COP event (COP21 in Paris) could motivate people to take action, in particular, works that offered messages of hope were most moving. Hopefully, the visitors at COP27 with the power to make change, too, were deeply impacted by these artworks and urged to take positive climate action.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
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