13/10/2022
Reviews
Jelena Sofronijevic
Glimpses: We Are What We See, showing now at 347 Old Street
Make sure to visit the identity-interrogating exhibitions before it closes on 17th October!

Tucked in the former ticket hall of Shoreditch railway station, Glimpses promises an unrestricted platform for self-exploration. The inaugural exhibition from parent agency Glimpses of Art includes 90% women and non-binary artists, working across disciplines and media including painting, photography, sculpture and illustration.

Muhammed Sajid, Magnolias, (2021)

For a debut, it certainly boasts a celebrity line-up; featured artists include Floria Sigismondi, music video director for the likes of David Bowie, Rihanna, Björk, and The White Stripes, to Charlie XCX favourite, Serwah Attafuah. Sandro Kopp, who moves between figuration and abstraction, is well-known, amongst other projects, for working on the Wes Anderson film, The French Dispatch.

Glimpses nominally leans on the cognitive therapy and psychology of The Johari Window, using the exhibition to explore how we can better understand ourselves through artistic representations. It’s ‘immersive transience’ is neatly defined in its layout. The Kachette is divided into four areas: Unknown (things I don’t see about myself and others don’t see either); Hidden (things I see about myself but others don’t see); Blind (things that others see about myself but I don’t see); and Open (things that people see about myself that I see too).

Unknown perhaps presents the most opportunity for experimental, psychological explorations. Still, the space is dominated by works of an explicit, sexual nature – almost as though it is intended as an easy shock to the viewer on entry. Selina Mayer’s graphic photographs sit alongside Marne Lucas’ Padre Mudro (Child’s Pose) videos, and infrared thermal video. 

Nicole Mazza, Disaster 1, part of Exhibición, (2022)

The works in Hidden hint at the chaos lurking beneath the surface of even the most composed people. Nicole Mazza’s saccharine scenes could be light-hearted social gatherings, but they really seem woven with unease. Her hot pink embroideries, picked out with watercolour pencil, are fraught with social tensions, so much that they practically fray at the edges. In the same space, Kim Jakobsson presents a pair of perfectly composed oil paintings, destroyed in the centre, suggesting an impactful comment on women’s mental health and beauty standards.

Kim Jakobsson, Rust, (2020)

Open contains the exhibition’s most exciting works; Muhammed Sajid, who also features elsewhere in the exhibition, offers a series of digital drawings, exposing the bones of blued female bodies, set against a picturesque floral background. 

Sandro Kopp, Body Web 01, (2022)

Sandro Kopps’ coloured pencil Body Webs are honest portrayals of the naked body, and the connections shared between humans, without being voyeuristic. Likewise, Kika Sroka-Miller’s naturalistic, sometimes unfinished, oil paintings offer a refreshingly ordinary perspective.  

Kika Sroka-Miller, Gal in Socks, (2021)

Glimpses offers an interesting approach to curation, permitting artists to feature throughout the exhibition and across themes, rather than be strictly categorised by chronology or geography. The venue – Kachette – offers a fantastic space for exploring the connections between themes. I look forward to seeing what arrives there next. 

Glimpses – We Are What We See is on view at Kachette until 17 October 2022. 

Don’t forget to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app when you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2022
Reviews
Jelena Sofronijevic
Glimpses: We Are What We See, showing now at 347 Old Street
Make sure to visit the identity-interrogating exhibitions before it closes on 17th October!

Tucked in the former ticket hall of Shoreditch railway station, Glimpses promises an unrestricted platform for self-exploration. The inaugural exhibition from parent agency Glimpses of Art includes 90% women and non-binary artists, working across disciplines and media including painting, photography, sculpture and illustration.

Muhammed Sajid, Magnolias, (2021)

For a debut, it certainly boasts a celebrity line-up; featured artists include Floria Sigismondi, music video director for the likes of David Bowie, Rihanna, Björk, and The White Stripes, to Charlie XCX favourite, Serwah Attafuah. Sandro Kopp, who moves between figuration and abstraction, is well-known, amongst other projects, for working on the Wes Anderson film, The French Dispatch.

Glimpses nominally leans on the cognitive therapy and psychology of The Johari Window, using the exhibition to explore how we can better understand ourselves through artistic representations. It’s ‘immersive transience’ is neatly defined in its layout. The Kachette is divided into four areas: Unknown (things I don’t see about myself and others don’t see either); Hidden (things I see about myself but others don’t see); Blind (things that others see about myself but I don’t see); and Open (things that people see about myself that I see too).

Unknown perhaps presents the most opportunity for experimental, psychological explorations. Still, the space is dominated by works of an explicit, sexual nature – almost as though it is intended as an easy shock to the viewer on entry. Selina Mayer’s graphic photographs sit alongside Marne Lucas’ Padre Mudro (Child’s Pose) videos, and infrared thermal video. 

Nicole Mazza, Disaster 1, part of Exhibición, (2022)

The works in Hidden hint at the chaos lurking beneath the surface of even the most composed people. Nicole Mazza’s saccharine scenes could be light-hearted social gatherings, but they really seem woven with unease. Her hot pink embroideries, picked out with watercolour pencil, are fraught with social tensions, so much that they practically fray at the edges. In the same space, Kim Jakobsson presents a pair of perfectly composed oil paintings, destroyed in the centre, suggesting an impactful comment on women’s mental health and beauty standards.

Kim Jakobsson, Rust, (2020)

Open contains the exhibition’s most exciting works; Muhammed Sajid, who also features elsewhere in the exhibition, offers a series of digital drawings, exposing the bones of blued female bodies, set against a picturesque floral background. 

Sandro Kopp, Body Web 01, (2022)

Sandro Kopps’ coloured pencil Body Webs are honest portrayals of the naked body, and the connections shared between humans, without being voyeuristic. Likewise, Kika Sroka-Miller’s naturalistic, sometimes unfinished, oil paintings offer a refreshingly ordinary perspective.  

Kika Sroka-Miller, Gal in Socks, (2021)

Glimpses offers an interesting approach to curation, permitting artists to feature throughout the exhibition and across themes, rather than be strictly categorised by chronology or geography. The venue – Kachette – offers a fantastic space for exploring the connections between themes. I look forward to seeing what arrives there next. 

Glimpses – We Are What We See is on view at Kachette until 17 October 2022. 

Don’t forget to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app when you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2022
Reviews
Jelena Sofronijevic
Glimpses: We Are What We See, showing now at 347 Old Street
Make sure to visit the identity-interrogating exhibitions before it closes on 17th October!

Tucked in the former ticket hall of Shoreditch railway station, Glimpses promises an unrestricted platform for self-exploration. The inaugural exhibition from parent agency Glimpses of Art includes 90% women and non-binary artists, working across disciplines and media including painting, photography, sculpture and illustration.

Muhammed Sajid, Magnolias, (2021)

For a debut, it certainly boasts a celebrity line-up; featured artists include Floria Sigismondi, music video director for the likes of David Bowie, Rihanna, Björk, and The White Stripes, to Charlie XCX favourite, Serwah Attafuah. Sandro Kopp, who moves between figuration and abstraction, is well-known, amongst other projects, for working on the Wes Anderson film, The French Dispatch.

Glimpses nominally leans on the cognitive therapy and psychology of The Johari Window, using the exhibition to explore how we can better understand ourselves through artistic representations. It’s ‘immersive transience’ is neatly defined in its layout. The Kachette is divided into four areas: Unknown (things I don’t see about myself and others don’t see either); Hidden (things I see about myself but others don’t see); Blind (things that others see about myself but I don’t see); and Open (things that people see about myself that I see too).

Unknown perhaps presents the most opportunity for experimental, psychological explorations. Still, the space is dominated by works of an explicit, sexual nature – almost as though it is intended as an easy shock to the viewer on entry. Selina Mayer’s graphic photographs sit alongside Marne Lucas’ Padre Mudro (Child’s Pose) videos, and infrared thermal video. 

Nicole Mazza, Disaster 1, part of Exhibición, (2022)

The works in Hidden hint at the chaos lurking beneath the surface of even the most composed people. Nicole Mazza’s saccharine scenes could be light-hearted social gatherings, but they really seem woven with unease. Her hot pink embroideries, picked out with watercolour pencil, are fraught with social tensions, so much that they practically fray at the edges. In the same space, Kim Jakobsson presents a pair of perfectly composed oil paintings, destroyed in the centre, suggesting an impactful comment on women’s mental health and beauty standards.

Kim Jakobsson, Rust, (2020)

Open contains the exhibition’s most exciting works; Muhammed Sajid, who also features elsewhere in the exhibition, offers a series of digital drawings, exposing the bones of blued female bodies, set against a picturesque floral background. 

Sandro Kopp, Body Web 01, (2022)

Sandro Kopps’ coloured pencil Body Webs are honest portrayals of the naked body, and the connections shared between humans, without being voyeuristic. Likewise, Kika Sroka-Miller’s naturalistic, sometimes unfinished, oil paintings offer a refreshingly ordinary perspective.  

Kika Sroka-Miller, Gal in Socks, (2021)

Glimpses offers an interesting approach to curation, permitting artists to feature throughout the exhibition and across themes, rather than be strictly categorised by chronology or geography. The venue – Kachette – offers a fantastic space for exploring the connections between themes. I look forward to seeing what arrives there next. 

Glimpses – We Are What We See is on view at Kachette until 17 October 2022. 

Don’t forget to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app when you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2022
Reviews
Jelena Sofronijevic
Glimpses: We Are What We See, showing now at 347 Old Street
Make sure to visit the identity-interrogating exhibitions before it closes on 17th October!

Tucked in the former ticket hall of Shoreditch railway station, Glimpses promises an unrestricted platform for self-exploration. The inaugural exhibition from parent agency Glimpses of Art includes 90% women and non-binary artists, working across disciplines and media including painting, photography, sculpture and illustration.

Muhammed Sajid, Magnolias, (2021)

For a debut, it certainly boasts a celebrity line-up; featured artists include Floria Sigismondi, music video director for the likes of David Bowie, Rihanna, Björk, and The White Stripes, to Charlie XCX favourite, Serwah Attafuah. Sandro Kopp, who moves between figuration and abstraction, is well-known, amongst other projects, for working on the Wes Anderson film, The French Dispatch.

Glimpses nominally leans on the cognitive therapy and psychology of The Johari Window, using the exhibition to explore how we can better understand ourselves through artistic representations. It’s ‘immersive transience’ is neatly defined in its layout. The Kachette is divided into four areas: Unknown (things I don’t see about myself and others don’t see either); Hidden (things I see about myself but others don’t see); Blind (things that others see about myself but I don’t see); and Open (things that people see about myself that I see too).

Unknown perhaps presents the most opportunity for experimental, psychological explorations. Still, the space is dominated by works of an explicit, sexual nature – almost as though it is intended as an easy shock to the viewer on entry. Selina Mayer’s graphic photographs sit alongside Marne Lucas’ Padre Mudro (Child’s Pose) videos, and infrared thermal video. 

Nicole Mazza, Disaster 1, part of Exhibición, (2022)

The works in Hidden hint at the chaos lurking beneath the surface of even the most composed people. Nicole Mazza’s saccharine scenes could be light-hearted social gatherings, but they really seem woven with unease. Her hot pink embroideries, picked out with watercolour pencil, are fraught with social tensions, so much that they practically fray at the edges. In the same space, Kim Jakobsson presents a pair of perfectly composed oil paintings, destroyed in the centre, suggesting an impactful comment on women’s mental health and beauty standards.

Kim Jakobsson, Rust, (2020)

Open contains the exhibition’s most exciting works; Muhammed Sajid, who also features elsewhere in the exhibition, offers a series of digital drawings, exposing the bones of blued female bodies, set against a picturesque floral background. 

Sandro Kopp, Body Web 01, (2022)

Sandro Kopps’ coloured pencil Body Webs are honest portrayals of the naked body, and the connections shared between humans, without being voyeuristic. Likewise, Kika Sroka-Miller’s naturalistic, sometimes unfinished, oil paintings offer a refreshingly ordinary perspective.  

Kika Sroka-Miller, Gal in Socks, (2021)

Glimpses offers an interesting approach to curation, permitting artists to feature throughout the exhibition and across themes, rather than be strictly categorised by chronology or geography. The venue – Kachette – offers a fantastic space for exploring the connections between themes. I look forward to seeing what arrives there next. 

Glimpses – We Are What We See is on view at Kachette until 17 October 2022. 

Don’t forget to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app when you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2022
Reviews
Jelena Sofronijevic
Glimpses: We Are What We See, showing now at 347 Old Street
Make sure to visit the identity-interrogating exhibitions before it closes on 17th October!

Tucked in the former ticket hall of Shoreditch railway station, Glimpses promises an unrestricted platform for self-exploration. The inaugural exhibition from parent agency Glimpses of Art includes 90% women and non-binary artists, working across disciplines and media including painting, photography, sculpture and illustration.

Muhammed Sajid, Magnolias, (2021)

For a debut, it certainly boasts a celebrity line-up; featured artists include Floria Sigismondi, music video director for the likes of David Bowie, Rihanna, Björk, and The White Stripes, to Charlie XCX favourite, Serwah Attafuah. Sandro Kopp, who moves between figuration and abstraction, is well-known, amongst other projects, for working on the Wes Anderson film, The French Dispatch.

Glimpses nominally leans on the cognitive therapy and psychology of The Johari Window, using the exhibition to explore how we can better understand ourselves through artistic representations. It’s ‘immersive transience’ is neatly defined in its layout. The Kachette is divided into four areas: Unknown (things I don’t see about myself and others don’t see either); Hidden (things I see about myself but others don’t see); Blind (things that others see about myself but I don’t see); and Open (things that people see about myself that I see too).

Unknown perhaps presents the most opportunity for experimental, psychological explorations. Still, the space is dominated by works of an explicit, sexual nature – almost as though it is intended as an easy shock to the viewer on entry. Selina Mayer’s graphic photographs sit alongside Marne Lucas’ Padre Mudro (Child’s Pose) videos, and infrared thermal video. 

Nicole Mazza, Disaster 1, part of Exhibición, (2022)

The works in Hidden hint at the chaos lurking beneath the surface of even the most composed people. Nicole Mazza’s saccharine scenes could be light-hearted social gatherings, but they really seem woven with unease. Her hot pink embroideries, picked out with watercolour pencil, are fraught with social tensions, so much that they practically fray at the edges. In the same space, Kim Jakobsson presents a pair of perfectly composed oil paintings, destroyed in the centre, suggesting an impactful comment on women’s mental health and beauty standards.

Kim Jakobsson, Rust, (2020)

Open contains the exhibition’s most exciting works; Muhammed Sajid, who also features elsewhere in the exhibition, offers a series of digital drawings, exposing the bones of blued female bodies, set against a picturesque floral background. 

Sandro Kopp, Body Web 01, (2022)

Sandro Kopps’ coloured pencil Body Webs are honest portrayals of the naked body, and the connections shared between humans, without being voyeuristic. Likewise, Kika Sroka-Miller’s naturalistic, sometimes unfinished, oil paintings offer a refreshingly ordinary perspective.  

Kika Sroka-Miller, Gal in Socks, (2021)

Glimpses offers an interesting approach to curation, permitting artists to feature throughout the exhibition and across themes, rather than be strictly categorised by chronology or geography. The venue – Kachette – offers a fantastic space for exploring the connections between themes. I look forward to seeing what arrives there next. 

Glimpses – We Are What We See is on view at Kachette until 17 October 2022. 

Don’t forget to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app when you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2022
Reviews
Jelena Sofronijevic
Glimpses: We Are What We See, showing now at 347 Old Street

Tucked in the former ticket hall of Shoreditch railway station, Glimpses promises an unrestricted platform for self-exploration. The inaugural exhibition from parent agency Glimpses of Art includes 90% women and non-binary artists, working across disciplines and media including painting, photography, sculpture and illustration.

Muhammed Sajid, Magnolias, (2021)

For a debut, it certainly boasts a celebrity line-up; featured artists include Floria Sigismondi, music video director for the likes of David Bowie, Rihanna, Björk, and The White Stripes, to Charlie XCX favourite, Serwah Attafuah. Sandro Kopp, who moves between figuration and abstraction, is well-known, amongst other projects, for working on the Wes Anderson film, The French Dispatch.

Glimpses nominally leans on the cognitive therapy and psychology of The Johari Window, using the exhibition to explore how we can better understand ourselves through artistic representations. It’s ‘immersive transience’ is neatly defined in its layout. The Kachette is divided into four areas: Unknown (things I don’t see about myself and others don’t see either); Hidden (things I see about myself but others don’t see); Blind (things that others see about myself but I don’t see); and Open (things that people see about myself that I see too).

Unknown perhaps presents the most opportunity for experimental, psychological explorations. Still, the space is dominated by works of an explicit, sexual nature – almost as though it is intended as an easy shock to the viewer on entry. Selina Mayer’s graphic photographs sit alongside Marne Lucas’ Padre Mudro (Child’s Pose) videos, and infrared thermal video. 

Nicole Mazza, Disaster 1, part of Exhibición, (2022)

The works in Hidden hint at the chaos lurking beneath the surface of even the most composed people. Nicole Mazza’s saccharine scenes could be light-hearted social gatherings, but they really seem woven with unease. Her hot pink embroideries, picked out with watercolour pencil, are fraught with social tensions, so much that they practically fray at the edges. In the same space, Kim Jakobsson presents a pair of perfectly composed oil paintings, destroyed in the centre, suggesting an impactful comment on women’s mental health and beauty standards.

Kim Jakobsson, Rust, (2020)

Open contains the exhibition’s most exciting works; Muhammed Sajid, who also features elsewhere in the exhibition, offers a series of digital drawings, exposing the bones of blued female bodies, set against a picturesque floral background. 

Sandro Kopp, Body Web 01, (2022)

Sandro Kopps’ coloured pencil Body Webs are honest portrayals of the naked body, and the connections shared between humans, without being voyeuristic. Likewise, Kika Sroka-Miller’s naturalistic, sometimes unfinished, oil paintings offer a refreshingly ordinary perspective.  

Kika Sroka-Miller, Gal in Socks, (2021)

Glimpses offers an interesting approach to curation, permitting artists to feature throughout the exhibition and across themes, rather than be strictly categorised by chronology or geography. The venue – Kachette – offers a fantastic space for exploring the connections between themes. I look forward to seeing what arrives there next. 

Glimpses – We Are What We See is on view at Kachette until 17 October 2022. 

Don’t forget to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app when you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2022
Reviews
Jelena Sofronijevic
Glimpses: We Are What We See, showing now at 347 Old Street
Make sure to visit the identity-interrogating exhibitions before it closes on 17th October!

Tucked in the former ticket hall of Shoreditch railway station, Glimpses promises an unrestricted platform for self-exploration. The inaugural exhibition from parent agency Glimpses of Art includes 90% women and non-binary artists, working across disciplines and media including painting, photography, sculpture and illustration.

Muhammed Sajid, Magnolias, (2021)

For a debut, it certainly boasts a celebrity line-up; featured artists include Floria Sigismondi, music video director for the likes of David Bowie, Rihanna, Björk, and The White Stripes, to Charlie XCX favourite, Serwah Attafuah. Sandro Kopp, who moves between figuration and abstraction, is well-known, amongst other projects, for working on the Wes Anderson film, The French Dispatch.

Glimpses nominally leans on the cognitive therapy and psychology of The Johari Window, using the exhibition to explore how we can better understand ourselves through artistic representations. It’s ‘immersive transience’ is neatly defined in its layout. The Kachette is divided into four areas: Unknown (things I don’t see about myself and others don’t see either); Hidden (things I see about myself but others don’t see); Blind (things that others see about myself but I don’t see); and Open (things that people see about myself that I see too).

Unknown perhaps presents the most opportunity for experimental, psychological explorations. Still, the space is dominated by works of an explicit, sexual nature – almost as though it is intended as an easy shock to the viewer on entry. Selina Mayer’s graphic photographs sit alongside Marne Lucas’ Padre Mudro (Child’s Pose) videos, and infrared thermal video. 

Nicole Mazza, Disaster 1, part of Exhibición, (2022)

The works in Hidden hint at the chaos lurking beneath the surface of even the most composed people. Nicole Mazza’s saccharine scenes could be light-hearted social gatherings, but they really seem woven with unease. Her hot pink embroideries, picked out with watercolour pencil, are fraught with social tensions, so much that they practically fray at the edges. In the same space, Kim Jakobsson presents a pair of perfectly composed oil paintings, destroyed in the centre, suggesting an impactful comment on women’s mental health and beauty standards.

Kim Jakobsson, Rust, (2020)

Open contains the exhibition’s most exciting works; Muhammed Sajid, who also features elsewhere in the exhibition, offers a series of digital drawings, exposing the bones of blued female bodies, set against a picturesque floral background. 

Sandro Kopp, Body Web 01, (2022)

Sandro Kopps’ coloured pencil Body Webs are honest portrayals of the naked body, and the connections shared between humans, without being voyeuristic. Likewise, Kika Sroka-Miller’s naturalistic, sometimes unfinished, oil paintings offer a refreshingly ordinary perspective.  

Kika Sroka-Miller, Gal in Socks, (2021)

Glimpses offers an interesting approach to curation, permitting artists to feature throughout the exhibition and across themes, rather than be strictly categorised by chronology or geography. The venue – Kachette – offers a fantastic space for exploring the connections between themes. I look forward to seeing what arrives there next. 

Glimpses – We Are What We See is on view at Kachette until 17 October 2022. 

Don’t forget to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app when you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2022
Reviews
Jelena Sofronijevic
Glimpses: We Are What We See, showing now at 347 Old Street
Make sure to visit the identity-interrogating exhibitions before it closes on 17th October!

Tucked in the former ticket hall of Shoreditch railway station, Glimpses promises an unrestricted platform for self-exploration. The inaugural exhibition from parent agency Glimpses of Art includes 90% women and non-binary artists, working across disciplines and media including painting, photography, sculpture and illustration.

Muhammed Sajid, Magnolias, (2021)

For a debut, it certainly boasts a celebrity line-up; featured artists include Floria Sigismondi, music video director for the likes of David Bowie, Rihanna, Björk, and The White Stripes, to Charlie XCX favourite, Serwah Attafuah. Sandro Kopp, who moves between figuration and abstraction, is well-known, amongst other projects, for working on the Wes Anderson film, The French Dispatch.

Glimpses nominally leans on the cognitive therapy and psychology of The Johari Window, using the exhibition to explore how we can better understand ourselves through artistic representations. It’s ‘immersive transience’ is neatly defined in its layout. The Kachette is divided into four areas: Unknown (things I don’t see about myself and others don’t see either); Hidden (things I see about myself but others don’t see); Blind (things that others see about myself but I don’t see); and Open (things that people see about myself that I see too).

Unknown perhaps presents the most opportunity for experimental, psychological explorations. Still, the space is dominated by works of an explicit, sexual nature – almost as though it is intended as an easy shock to the viewer on entry. Selina Mayer’s graphic photographs sit alongside Marne Lucas’ Padre Mudro (Child’s Pose) videos, and infrared thermal video. 

Nicole Mazza, Disaster 1, part of Exhibición, (2022)

The works in Hidden hint at the chaos lurking beneath the surface of even the most composed people. Nicole Mazza’s saccharine scenes could be light-hearted social gatherings, but they really seem woven with unease. Her hot pink embroideries, picked out with watercolour pencil, are fraught with social tensions, so much that they practically fray at the edges. In the same space, Kim Jakobsson presents a pair of perfectly composed oil paintings, destroyed in the centre, suggesting an impactful comment on women’s mental health and beauty standards.

Kim Jakobsson, Rust, (2020)

Open contains the exhibition’s most exciting works; Muhammed Sajid, who also features elsewhere in the exhibition, offers a series of digital drawings, exposing the bones of blued female bodies, set against a picturesque floral background. 

Sandro Kopp, Body Web 01, (2022)

Sandro Kopps’ coloured pencil Body Webs are honest portrayals of the naked body, and the connections shared between humans, without being voyeuristic. Likewise, Kika Sroka-Miller’s naturalistic, sometimes unfinished, oil paintings offer a refreshingly ordinary perspective.  

Kika Sroka-Miller, Gal in Socks, (2021)

Glimpses offers an interesting approach to curation, permitting artists to feature throughout the exhibition and across themes, rather than be strictly categorised by chronology or geography. The venue – Kachette – offers a fantastic space for exploring the connections between themes. I look forward to seeing what arrives there next. 

Glimpses – We Are What We See is on view at Kachette until 17 October 2022. 

Don’t forget to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app when you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2022
Reviews
Jelena Sofronijevic
Glimpses: We Are What We See, showing now at 347 Old Street
Make sure to visit the identity-interrogating exhibitions before it closes on 17th October!

Tucked in the former ticket hall of Shoreditch railway station, Glimpses promises an unrestricted platform for self-exploration. The inaugural exhibition from parent agency Glimpses of Art includes 90% women and non-binary artists, working across disciplines and media including painting, photography, sculpture and illustration.

Muhammed Sajid, Magnolias, (2021)

For a debut, it certainly boasts a celebrity line-up; featured artists include Floria Sigismondi, music video director for the likes of David Bowie, Rihanna, Björk, and The White Stripes, to Charlie XCX favourite, Serwah Attafuah. Sandro Kopp, who moves between figuration and abstraction, is well-known, amongst other projects, for working on the Wes Anderson film, The French Dispatch.

Glimpses nominally leans on the cognitive therapy and psychology of The Johari Window, using the exhibition to explore how we can better understand ourselves through artistic representations. It’s ‘immersive transience’ is neatly defined in its layout. The Kachette is divided into four areas: Unknown (things I don’t see about myself and others don’t see either); Hidden (things I see about myself but others don’t see); Blind (things that others see about myself but I don’t see); and Open (things that people see about myself that I see too).

Unknown perhaps presents the most opportunity for experimental, psychological explorations. Still, the space is dominated by works of an explicit, sexual nature – almost as though it is intended as an easy shock to the viewer on entry. Selina Mayer’s graphic photographs sit alongside Marne Lucas’ Padre Mudro (Child’s Pose) videos, and infrared thermal video. 

Nicole Mazza, Disaster 1, part of Exhibición, (2022)

The works in Hidden hint at the chaos lurking beneath the surface of even the most composed people. Nicole Mazza’s saccharine scenes could be light-hearted social gatherings, but they really seem woven with unease. Her hot pink embroideries, picked out with watercolour pencil, are fraught with social tensions, so much that they practically fray at the edges. In the same space, Kim Jakobsson presents a pair of perfectly composed oil paintings, destroyed in the centre, suggesting an impactful comment on women’s mental health and beauty standards.

Kim Jakobsson, Rust, (2020)

Open contains the exhibition’s most exciting works; Muhammed Sajid, who also features elsewhere in the exhibition, offers a series of digital drawings, exposing the bones of blued female bodies, set against a picturesque floral background. 

Sandro Kopp, Body Web 01, (2022)

Sandro Kopps’ coloured pencil Body Webs are honest portrayals of the naked body, and the connections shared between humans, without being voyeuristic. Likewise, Kika Sroka-Miller’s naturalistic, sometimes unfinished, oil paintings offer a refreshingly ordinary perspective.  

Kika Sroka-Miller, Gal in Socks, (2021)

Glimpses offers an interesting approach to curation, permitting artists to feature throughout the exhibition and across themes, rather than be strictly categorised by chronology or geography. The venue – Kachette – offers a fantastic space for exploring the connections between themes. I look forward to seeing what arrives there next. 

Glimpses – We Are What We See is on view at Kachette until 17 October 2022. 

Don’t forget to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app when you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
13/10/2022
Reviews
Jelena Sofronijevic
Glimpses: We Are What We See, showing now at 347 Old Street
Make sure to visit the identity-interrogating exhibitions before it closes on 17th October!

Tucked in the former ticket hall of Shoreditch railway station, Glimpses promises an unrestricted platform for self-exploration. The inaugural exhibition from parent agency Glimpses of Art includes 90% women and non-binary artists, working across disciplines and media including painting, photography, sculpture and illustration.

Muhammed Sajid, Magnolias, (2021)

For a debut, it certainly boasts a celebrity line-up; featured artists include Floria Sigismondi, music video director for the likes of David Bowie, Rihanna, Björk, and The White Stripes, to Charlie XCX favourite, Serwah Attafuah. Sandro Kopp, who moves between figuration and abstraction, is well-known, amongst other projects, for working on the Wes Anderson film, The French Dispatch.

Glimpses nominally leans on the cognitive therapy and psychology of The Johari Window, using the exhibition to explore how we can better understand ourselves through artistic representations. It’s ‘immersive transience’ is neatly defined in its layout. The Kachette is divided into four areas: Unknown (things I don’t see about myself and others don’t see either); Hidden (things I see about myself but others don’t see); Blind (things that others see about myself but I don’t see); and Open (things that people see about myself that I see too).

Unknown perhaps presents the most opportunity for experimental, psychological explorations. Still, the space is dominated by works of an explicit, sexual nature – almost as though it is intended as an easy shock to the viewer on entry. Selina Mayer’s graphic photographs sit alongside Marne Lucas’ Padre Mudro (Child’s Pose) videos, and infrared thermal video. 

Nicole Mazza, Disaster 1, part of Exhibición, (2022)

The works in Hidden hint at the chaos lurking beneath the surface of even the most composed people. Nicole Mazza’s saccharine scenes could be light-hearted social gatherings, but they really seem woven with unease. Her hot pink embroideries, picked out with watercolour pencil, are fraught with social tensions, so much that they practically fray at the edges. In the same space, Kim Jakobsson presents a pair of perfectly composed oil paintings, destroyed in the centre, suggesting an impactful comment on women’s mental health and beauty standards.

Kim Jakobsson, Rust, (2020)

Open contains the exhibition’s most exciting works; Muhammed Sajid, who also features elsewhere in the exhibition, offers a series of digital drawings, exposing the bones of blued female bodies, set against a picturesque floral background. 

Sandro Kopp, Body Web 01, (2022)

Sandro Kopps’ coloured pencil Body Webs are honest portrayals of the naked body, and the connections shared between humans, without being voyeuristic. Likewise, Kika Sroka-Miller’s naturalistic, sometimes unfinished, oil paintings offer a refreshingly ordinary perspective.  

Kika Sroka-Miller, Gal in Socks, (2021)

Glimpses offers an interesting approach to curation, permitting artists to feature throughout the exhibition and across themes, rather than be strictly categorised by chronology or geography. The venue – Kachette – offers a fantastic space for exploring the connections between themes. I look forward to seeing what arrives there next. 

Glimpses – We Are What We See is on view at Kachette until 17 October 2022. 

Don’t forget to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app when you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
Thanks For Reading
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.