03/11/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this November
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing in the capital this month
Strange Clay: Ceramic in Contemporary Art installation view

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art at Hayward Gallery

The first ever large-scale UK exhibition dedicated to the use of clay in contemporary art, this exhibition at the Southbank’s Hayward Gallery features 23 artists from around the world, all working in ceramics. Addressing such subjects as politics, the human body, architecture and social justice, the pieces on display showcase the possibilities allowed by the medium, from the most ambitious large-scale installation to eccentric abstract sculptures. The fairytale-like fantastical creatures of Klara Kristalova’s botanical installation are presented alongside David Zink Yi’s colossal squid of Untitled (Architeuthis) (2010), spanning over five metres of the gallery space’s floor. Elsewhere, Takuro Kuwata reimagines the functional object of a Japanese tea bowl - or chawan - in bright colours, oversized dimensions and organic textures. Woody De Othello’s work similarly plays with everyday items , with his pieces depicting traditional household objects twisted and anthropomorphised to create humorous works which simultaneously offer the artist’s reflections on society and race.

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art is showing at Hayward Gallery until 8th January 2023

Portrait of a Young Girl, Eaton Place, London (1955) Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror at Tate Britain

The title of Tate Britain’s new exhibition showcasing the work of British photographer Bill Brandt comes from the artist’s desire to ‘enter the mirror’ of his subjects with his work. First known for capturing observations of British life as a photojournalist in the 1930s, Brandt later became acclaimed for his landscapes, portraits and nudes, with his formal experimentation aiming to evoke the surreal beauty he saw in everyday life. Though they frequently appear to be candid, Brandt’s portraits were in fact highly composed creations; through lighting and directions of his subjects he aimed to evoke “the spell that charges the commonplace with beauty”. He developed his own film and printed his own photographs, allowing him to retroactively adjust light and dark, and alter the composition through cropping. The plumes of smoke in his piece Hail, Hell & Halifax were even added later with ink and pencil, further demonstrating the perfectionism and attention to detail inherent in Brandt’s work. Also explored  in this exhibition are the myriad inspirations behind Brandt’s work, such as Gustave Doré’s engravings of London, John Tenniel’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland, and the dramatic shadows of Expressionist cinema and, later, Orson Welles’ 1941 film Citizen Kane.

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror is showing at Tate Britain until 15th January 2023

The Horror Show promotional image

The Horror Show!: A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain at Somerset House

Halloween may be over, but Somerset House’s The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is only just getting started! This major new exhibition explores “how ideas rooted in horror have informed the last 50 years of creative rebellion”, from the socially disruptive aims of 1970s punk to modern reinterpretations and reclamations of witchcraft. Through various social transgressions and subversions, horror is able to indicate contemporary cultural anxieties, with this exhibition allowing viewers to trace evolving societal values over the last five decades. The Horror Show! splits its over 500 artworks into three acts, each interpreting different eras of Britain’s recent history through the lens of their respective horror archetypes. The first section, ‘Monster’, tracks the political turbulence of the 1970s and the social division of the 1980s with works by Chila Kumari Burman, Noel Fielding and Bauhaus among others. Following this, the exhibition’s second act ‘Ghost’ brings together works by Laura Grace Ford, David Shrigley and filmmaker Nicolas Roeg to investigate the path leading from the 1990s to the 2008 financial crash. The show concludes with ‘Witch’, celebrating the emerging younger generation and its interconnected communities - or covens - allowed by modern technology through works by such artists as Penny Slinger, Zadie Xa and Leonora Carrington. For anyone with even a passing interest in horror and/or cultural history, The Horror Show! stands as an absolute must-see.

The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is showing at Somerset House until 19th February 2023

Nharo Dzakanyarara (a quiet resistance) (2022) Virginia Chihota

I See You at Tiwani Contemporary

Opening on 4th November at Tiwani Contemporary, I See You is a group show featuring Virginia Chihota, Gideon Gomo, Masimba Hwati, Gareth Nyandoro and Portia Zvavahera, all alumni of the National Gallery School of Visual Arts and Design at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. The artists have remained close, maintaining their international careers from Harare, Addis Ababa and Vienna, with Chihota, Zvavahera, Hwati and Nyandoro receiving acclaim for representing Zimbabwe at the Venice Biennale in 2013 and 2015. I See You works as an expression of the two-decade-long friendship between these artists, utilising painting, sculpture, performance and drawing while also demonstrating the ways in which each of them respond to the concept of ‘environment’.

I See You is showing at Tiwani Contemporary from 4th November - 14th January 2023

‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
03/11/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this November
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing in the capital this month
Strange Clay: Ceramic in Contemporary Art installation view

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art at Hayward Gallery

The first ever large-scale UK exhibition dedicated to the use of clay in contemporary art, this exhibition at the Southbank’s Hayward Gallery features 23 artists from around the world, all working in ceramics. Addressing such subjects as politics, the human body, architecture and social justice, the pieces on display showcase the possibilities allowed by the medium, from the most ambitious large-scale installation to eccentric abstract sculptures. The fairytale-like fantastical creatures of Klara Kristalova’s botanical installation are presented alongside David Zink Yi’s colossal squid of Untitled (Architeuthis) (2010), spanning over five metres of the gallery space’s floor. Elsewhere, Takuro Kuwata reimagines the functional object of a Japanese tea bowl - or chawan - in bright colours, oversized dimensions and organic textures. Woody De Othello’s work similarly plays with everyday items , with his pieces depicting traditional household objects twisted and anthropomorphised to create humorous works which simultaneously offer the artist’s reflections on society and race.

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art is showing at Hayward Gallery until 8th January 2023

Portrait of a Young Girl, Eaton Place, London (1955) Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror at Tate Britain

The title of Tate Britain’s new exhibition showcasing the work of British photographer Bill Brandt comes from the artist’s desire to ‘enter the mirror’ of his subjects with his work. First known for capturing observations of British life as a photojournalist in the 1930s, Brandt later became acclaimed for his landscapes, portraits and nudes, with his formal experimentation aiming to evoke the surreal beauty he saw in everyday life. Though they frequently appear to be candid, Brandt’s portraits were in fact highly composed creations; through lighting and directions of his subjects he aimed to evoke “the spell that charges the commonplace with beauty”. He developed his own film and printed his own photographs, allowing him to retroactively adjust light and dark, and alter the composition through cropping. The plumes of smoke in his piece Hail, Hell & Halifax were even added later with ink and pencil, further demonstrating the perfectionism and attention to detail inherent in Brandt’s work. Also explored  in this exhibition are the myriad inspirations behind Brandt’s work, such as Gustave Doré’s engravings of London, John Tenniel’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland, and the dramatic shadows of Expressionist cinema and, later, Orson Welles’ 1941 film Citizen Kane.

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror is showing at Tate Britain until 15th January 2023

The Horror Show promotional image

The Horror Show!: A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain at Somerset House

Halloween may be over, but Somerset House’s The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is only just getting started! This major new exhibition explores “how ideas rooted in horror have informed the last 50 years of creative rebellion”, from the socially disruptive aims of 1970s punk to modern reinterpretations and reclamations of witchcraft. Through various social transgressions and subversions, horror is able to indicate contemporary cultural anxieties, with this exhibition allowing viewers to trace evolving societal values over the last five decades. The Horror Show! splits its over 500 artworks into three acts, each interpreting different eras of Britain’s recent history through the lens of their respective horror archetypes. The first section, ‘Monster’, tracks the political turbulence of the 1970s and the social division of the 1980s with works by Chila Kumari Burman, Noel Fielding and Bauhaus among others. Following this, the exhibition’s second act ‘Ghost’ brings together works by Laura Grace Ford, David Shrigley and filmmaker Nicolas Roeg to investigate the path leading from the 1990s to the 2008 financial crash. The show concludes with ‘Witch’, celebrating the emerging younger generation and its interconnected communities - or covens - allowed by modern technology through works by such artists as Penny Slinger, Zadie Xa and Leonora Carrington. For anyone with even a passing interest in horror and/or cultural history, The Horror Show! stands as an absolute must-see.

The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is showing at Somerset House until 19th February 2023

Nharo Dzakanyarara (a quiet resistance) (2022) Virginia Chihota

I See You at Tiwani Contemporary

Opening on 4th November at Tiwani Contemporary, I See You is a group show featuring Virginia Chihota, Gideon Gomo, Masimba Hwati, Gareth Nyandoro and Portia Zvavahera, all alumni of the National Gallery School of Visual Arts and Design at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. The artists have remained close, maintaining their international careers from Harare, Addis Ababa and Vienna, with Chihota, Zvavahera, Hwati and Nyandoro receiving acclaim for representing Zimbabwe at the Venice Biennale in 2013 and 2015. I See You works as an expression of the two-decade-long friendship between these artists, utilising painting, sculpture, performance and drawing while also demonstrating the ways in which each of them respond to the concept of ‘environment’.

I See You is showing at Tiwani Contemporary from 4th November - 14th January 2023

‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
03/11/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this November
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing in the capital this month
Strange Clay: Ceramic in Contemporary Art installation view

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art at Hayward Gallery

The first ever large-scale UK exhibition dedicated to the use of clay in contemporary art, this exhibition at the Southbank’s Hayward Gallery features 23 artists from around the world, all working in ceramics. Addressing such subjects as politics, the human body, architecture and social justice, the pieces on display showcase the possibilities allowed by the medium, from the most ambitious large-scale installation to eccentric abstract sculptures. The fairytale-like fantastical creatures of Klara Kristalova’s botanical installation are presented alongside David Zink Yi’s colossal squid of Untitled (Architeuthis) (2010), spanning over five metres of the gallery space’s floor. Elsewhere, Takuro Kuwata reimagines the functional object of a Japanese tea bowl - or chawan - in bright colours, oversized dimensions and organic textures. Woody De Othello’s work similarly plays with everyday items , with his pieces depicting traditional household objects twisted and anthropomorphised to create humorous works which simultaneously offer the artist’s reflections on society and race.

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art is showing at Hayward Gallery until 8th January 2023

Portrait of a Young Girl, Eaton Place, London (1955) Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror at Tate Britain

The title of Tate Britain’s new exhibition showcasing the work of British photographer Bill Brandt comes from the artist’s desire to ‘enter the mirror’ of his subjects with his work. First known for capturing observations of British life as a photojournalist in the 1930s, Brandt later became acclaimed for his landscapes, portraits and nudes, with his formal experimentation aiming to evoke the surreal beauty he saw in everyday life. Though they frequently appear to be candid, Brandt’s portraits were in fact highly composed creations; through lighting and directions of his subjects he aimed to evoke “the spell that charges the commonplace with beauty”. He developed his own film and printed his own photographs, allowing him to retroactively adjust light and dark, and alter the composition through cropping. The plumes of smoke in his piece Hail, Hell & Halifax were even added later with ink and pencil, further demonstrating the perfectionism and attention to detail inherent in Brandt’s work. Also explored  in this exhibition are the myriad inspirations behind Brandt’s work, such as Gustave Doré’s engravings of London, John Tenniel’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland, and the dramatic shadows of Expressionist cinema and, later, Orson Welles’ 1941 film Citizen Kane.

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror is showing at Tate Britain until 15th January 2023

The Horror Show promotional image

The Horror Show!: A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain at Somerset House

Halloween may be over, but Somerset House’s The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is only just getting started! This major new exhibition explores “how ideas rooted in horror have informed the last 50 years of creative rebellion”, from the socially disruptive aims of 1970s punk to modern reinterpretations and reclamations of witchcraft. Through various social transgressions and subversions, horror is able to indicate contemporary cultural anxieties, with this exhibition allowing viewers to trace evolving societal values over the last five decades. The Horror Show! splits its over 500 artworks into three acts, each interpreting different eras of Britain’s recent history through the lens of their respective horror archetypes. The first section, ‘Monster’, tracks the political turbulence of the 1970s and the social division of the 1980s with works by Chila Kumari Burman, Noel Fielding and Bauhaus among others. Following this, the exhibition’s second act ‘Ghost’ brings together works by Laura Grace Ford, David Shrigley and filmmaker Nicolas Roeg to investigate the path leading from the 1990s to the 2008 financial crash. The show concludes with ‘Witch’, celebrating the emerging younger generation and its interconnected communities - or covens - allowed by modern technology through works by such artists as Penny Slinger, Zadie Xa and Leonora Carrington. For anyone with even a passing interest in horror and/or cultural history, The Horror Show! stands as an absolute must-see.

The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is showing at Somerset House until 19th February 2023

Nharo Dzakanyarara (a quiet resistance) (2022) Virginia Chihota

I See You at Tiwani Contemporary

Opening on 4th November at Tiwani Contemporary, I See You is a group show featuring Virginia Chihota, Gideon Gomo, Masimba Hwati, Gareth Nyandoro and Portia Zvavahera, all alumni of the National Gallery School of Visual Arts and Design at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. The artists have remained close, maintaining their international careers from Harare, Addis Ababa and Vienna, with Chihota, Zvavahera, Hwati and Nyandoro receiving acclaim for representing Zimbabwe at the Venice Biennale in 2013 and 2015. I See You works as an expression of the two-decade-long friendship between these artists, utilising painting, sculpture, performance and drawing while also demonstrating the ways in which each of them respond to the concept of ‘environment’.

I See You is showing at Tiwani Contemporary from 4th November - 14th January 2023

‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
03/11/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this November
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing in the capital this month
Strange Clay: Ceramic in Contemporary Art installation view

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art at Hayward Gallery

The first ever large-scale UK exhibition dedicated to the use of clay in contemporary art, this exhibition at the Southbank’s Hayward Gallery features 23 artists from around the world, all working in ceramics. Addressing such subjects as politics, the human body, architecture and social justice, the pieces on display showcase the possibilities allowed by the medium, from the most ambitious large-scale installation to eccentric abstract sculptures. The fairytale-like fantastical creatures of Klara Kristalova’s botanical installation are presented alongside David Zink Yi’s colossal squid of Untitled (Architeuthis) (2010), spanning over five metres of the gallery space’s floor. Elsewhere, Takuro Kuwata reimagines the functional object of a Japanese tea bowl - or chawan - in bright colours, oversized dimensions and organic textures. Woody De Othello’s work similarly plays with everyday items , with his pieces depicting traditional household objects twisted and anthropomorphised to create humorous works which simultaneously offer the artist’s reflections on society and race.

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art is showing at Hayward Gallery until 8th January 2023

Portrait of a Young Girl, Eaton Place, London (1955) Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror at Tate Britain

The title of Tate Britain’s new exhibition showcasing the work of British photographer Bill Brandt comes from the artist’s desire to ‘enter the mirror’ of his subjects with his work. First known for capturing observations of British life as a photojournalist in the 1930s, Brandt later became acclaimed for his landscapes, portraits and nudes, with his formal experimentation aiming to evoke the surreal beauty he saw in everyday life. Though they frequently appear to be candid, Brandt’s portraits were in fact highly composed creations; through lighting and directions of his subjects he aimed to evoke “the spell that charges the commonplace with beauty”. He developed his own film and printed his own photographs, allowing him to retroactively adjust light and dark, and alter the composition through cropping. The plumes of smoke in his piece Hail, Hell & Halifax were even added later with ink and pencil, further demonstrating the perfectionism and attention to detail inherent in Brandt’s work. Also explored  in this exhibition are the myriad inspirations behind Brandt’s work, such as Gustave Doré’s engravings of London, John Tenniel’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland, and the dramatic shadows of Expressionist cinema and, later, Orson Welles’ 1941 film Citizen Kane.

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror is showing at Tate Britain until 15th January 2023

The Horror Show promotional image

The Horror Show!: A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain at Somerset House

Halloween may be over, but Somerset House’s The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is only just getting started! This major new exhibition explores “how ideas rooted in horror have informed the last 50 years of creative rebellion”, from the socially disruptive aims of 1970s punk to modern reinterpretations and reclamations of witchcraft. Through various social transgressions and subversions, horror is able to indicate contemporary cultural anxieties, with this exhibition allowing viewers to trace evolving societal values over the last five decades. The Horror Show! splits its over 500 artworks into three acts, each interpreting different eras of Britain’s recent history through the lens of their respective horror archetypes. The first section, ‘Monster’, tracks the political turbulence of the 1970s and the social division of the 1980s with works by Chila Kumari Burman, Noel Fielding and Bauhaus among others. Following this, the exhibition’s second act ‘Ghost’ brings together works by Laura Grace Ford, David Shrigley and filmmaker Nicolas Roeg to investigate the path leading from the 1990s to the 2008 financial crash. The show concludes with ‘Witch’, celebrating the emerging younger generation and its interconnected communities - or covens - allowed by modern technology through works by such artists as Penny Slinger, Zadie Xa and Leonora Carrington. For anyone with even a passing interest in horror and/or cultural history, The Horror Show! stands as an absolute must-see.

The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is showing at Somerset House until 19th February 2023

Nharo Dzakanyarara (a quiet resistance) (2022) Virginia Chihota

I See You at Tiwani Contemporary

Opening on 4th November at Tiwani Contemporary, I See You is a group show featuring Virginia Chihota, Gideon Gomo, Masimba Hwati, Gareth Nyandoro and Portia Zvavahera, all alumni of the National Gallery School of Visual Arts and Design at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. The artists have remained close, maintaining their international careers from Harare, Addis Ababa and Vienna, with Chihota, Zvavahera, Hwati and Nyandoro receiving acclaim for representing Zimbabwe at the Venice Biennale in 2013 and 2015. I See You works as an expression of the two-decade-long friendship between these artists, utilising painting, sculpture, performance and drawing while also demonstrating the ways in which each of them respond to the concept of ‘environment’.

I See You is showing at Tiwani Contemporary from 4th November - 14th January 2023

‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
03/11/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this November
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing in the capital this month
Strange Clay: Ceramic in Contemporary Art installation view

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art at Hayward Gallery

The first ever large-scale UK exhibition dedicated to the use of clay in contemporary art, this exhibition at the Southbank’s Hayward Gallery features 23 artists from around the world, all working in ceramics. Addressing such subjects as politics, the human body, architecture and social justice, the pieces on display showcase the possibilities allowed by the medium, from the most ambitious large-scale installation to eccentric abstract sculptures. The fairytale-like fantastical creatures of Klara Kristalova’s botanical installation are presented alongside David Zink Yi’s colossal squid of Untitled (Architeuthis) (2010), spanning over five metres of the gallery space’s floor. Elsewhere, Takuro Kuwata reimagines the functional object of a Japanese tea bowl - or chawan - in bright colours, oversized dimensions and organic textures. Woody De Othello’s work similarly plays with everyday items , with his pieces depicting traditional household objects twisted and anthropomorphised to create humorous works which simultaneously offer the artist’s reflections on society and race.

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art is showing at Hayward Gallery until 8th January 2023

Portrait of a Young Girl, Eaton Place, London (1955) Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror at Tate Britain

The title of Tate Britain’s new exhibition showcasing the work of British photographer Bill Brandt comes from the artist’s desire to ‘enter the mirror’ of his subjects with his work. First known for capturing observations of British life as a photojournalist in the 1930s, Brandt later became acclaimed for his landscapes, portraits and nudes, with his formal experimentation aiming to evoke the surreal beauty he saw in everyday life. Though they frequently appear to be candid, Brandt’s portraits were in fact highly composed creations; through lighting and directions of his subjects he aimed to evoke “the spell that charges the commonplace with beauty”. He developed his own film and printed his own photographs, allowing him to retroactively adjust light and dark, and alter the composition through cropping. The plumes of smoke in his piece Hail, Hell & Halifax were even added later with ink and pencil, further demonstrating the perfectionism and attention to detail inherent in Brandt’s work. Also explored  in this exhibition are the myriad inspirations behind Brandt’s work, such as Gustave Doré’s engravings of London, John Tenniel’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland, and the dramatic shadows of Expressionist cinema and, later, Orson Welles’ 1941 film Citizen Kane.

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror is showing at Tate Britain until 15th January 2023

The Horror Show promotional image

The Horror Show!: A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain at Somerset House

Halloween may be over, but Somerset House’s The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is only just getting started! This major new exhibition explores “how ideas rooted in horror have informed the last 50 years of creative rebellion”, from the socially disruptive aims of 1970s punk to modern reinterpretations and reclamations of witchcraft. Through various social transgressions and subversions, horror is able to indicate contemporary cultural anxieties, with this exhibition allowing viewers to trace evolving societal values over the last five decades. The Horror Show! splits its over 500 artworks into three acts, each interpreting different eras of Britain’s recent history through the lens of their respective horror archetypes. The first section, ‘Monster’, tracks the political turbulence of the 1970s and the social division of the 1980s with works by Chila Kumari Burman, Noel Fielding and Bauhaus among others. Following this, the exhibition’s second act ‘Ghost’ brings together works by Laura Grace Ford, David Shrigley and filmmaker Nicolas Roeg to investigate the path leading from the 1990s to the 2008 financial crash. The show concludes with ‘Witch’, celebrating the emerging younger generation and its interconnected communities - or covens - allowed by modern technology through works by such artists as Penny Slinger, Zadie Xa and Leonora Carrington. For anyone with even a passing interest in horror and/or cultural history, The Horror Show! stands as an absolute must-see.

The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is showing at Somerset House until 19th February 2023

Nharo Dzakanyarara (a quiet resistance) (2022) Virginia Chihota

I See You at Tiwani Contemporary

Opening on 4th November at Tiwani Contemporary, I See You is a group show featuring Virginia Chihota, Gideon Gomo, Masimba Hwati, Gareth Nyandoro and Portia Zvavahera, all alumni of the National Gallery School of Visual Arts and Design at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. The artists have remained close, maintaining their international careers from Harare, Addis Ababa and Vienna, with Chihota, Zvavahera, Hwati and Nyandoro receiving acclaim for representing Zimbabwe at the Venice Biennale in 2013 and 2015. I See You works as an expression of the two-decade-long friendship between these artists, utilising painting, sculpture, performance and drawing while also demonstrating the ways in which each of them respond to the concept of ‘environment’.

I See You is showing at Tiwani Contemporary from 4th November - 14th January 2023

‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
03/11/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this November
Strange Clay: Ceramic in Contemporary Art installation view

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art at Hayward Gallery

The first ever large-scale UK exhibition dedicated to the use of clay in contemporary art, this exhibition at the Southbank’s Hayward Gallery features 23 artists from around the world, all working in ceramics. Addressing such subjects as politics, the human body, architecture and social justice, the pieces on display showcase the possibilities allowed by the medium, from the most ambitious large-scale installation to eccentric abstract sculptures. The fairytale-like fantastical creatures of Klara Kristalova’s botanical installation are presented alongside David Zink Yi’s colossal squid of Untitled (Architeuthis) (2010), spanning over five metres of the gallery space’s floor. Elsewhere, Takuro Kuwata reimagines the functional object of a Japanese tea bowl - or chawan - in bright colours, oversized dimensions and organic textures. Woody De Othello’s work similarly plays with everyday items , with his pieces depicting traditional household objects twisted and anthropomorphised to create humorous works which simultaneously offer the artist’s reflections on society and race.

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art is showing at Hayward Gallery until 8th January 2023

Portrait of a Young Girl, Eaton Place, London (1955) Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror at Tate Britain

The title of Tate Britain’s new exhibition showcasing the work of British photographer Bill Brandt comes from the artist’s desire to ‘enter the mirror’ of his subjects with his work. First known for capturing observations of British life as a photojournalist in the 1930s, Brandt later became acclaimed for his landscapes, portraits and nudes, with his formal experimentation aiming to evoke the surreal beauty he saw in everyday life. Though they frequently appear to be candid, Brandt’s portraits were in fact highly composed creations; through lighting and directions of his subjects he aimed to evoke “the spell that charges the commonplace with beauty”. He developed his own film and printed his own photographs, allowing him to retroactively adjust light and dark, and alter the composition through cropping. The plumes of smoke in his piece Hail, Hell & Halifax were even added later with ink and pencil, further demonstrating the perfectionism and attention to detail inherent in Brandt’s work. Also explored  in this exhibition are the myriad inspirations behind Brandt’s work, such as Gustave Doré’s engravings of London, John Tenniel’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland, and the dramatic shadows of Expressionist cinema and, later, Orson Welles’ 1941 film Citizen Kane.

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror is showing at Tate Britain until 15th January 2023

The Horror Show promotional image

The Horror Show!: A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain at Somerset House

Halloween may be over, but Somerset House’s The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is only just getting started! This major new exhibition explores “how ideas rooted in horror have informed the last 50 years of creative rebellion”, from the socially disruptive aims of 1970s punk to modern reinterpretations and reclamations of witchcraft. Through various social transgressions and subversions, horror is able to indicate contemporary cultural anxieties, with this exhibition allowing viewers to trace evolving societal values over the last five decades. The Horror Show! splits its over 500 artworks into three acts, each interpreting different eras of Britain’s recent history through the lens of their respective horror archetypes. The first section, ‘Monster’, tracks the political turbulence of the 1970s and the social division of the 1980s with works by Chila Kumari Burman, Noel Fielding and Bauhaus among others. Following this, the exhibition’s second act ‘Ghost’ brings together works by Laura Grace Ford, David Shrigley and filmmaker Nicolas Roeg to investigate the path leading from the 1990s to the 2008 financial crash. The show concludes with ‘Witch’, celebrating the emerging younger generation and its interconnected communities - or covens - allowed by modern technology through works by such artists as Penny Slinger, Zadie Xa and Leonora Carrington. For anyone with even a passing interest in horror and/or cultural history, The Horror Show! stands as an absolute must-see.

The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is showing at Somerset House until 19th February 2023

Nharo Dzakanyarara (a quiet resistance) (2022) Virginia Chihota

I See You at Tiwani Contemporary

Opening on 4th November at Tiwani Contemporary, I See You is a group show featuring Virginia Chihota, Gideon Gomo, Masimba Hwati, Gareth Nyandoro and Portia Zvavahera, all alumni of the National Gallery School of Visual Arts and Design at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. The artists have remained close, maintaining their international careers from Harare, Addis Ababa and Vienna, with Chihota, Zvavahera, Hwati and Nyandoro receiving acclaim for representing Zimbabwe at the Venice Biennale in 2013 and 2015. I See You works as an expression of the two-decade-long friendship between these artists, utilising painting, sculpture, performance and drawing while also demonstrating the ways in which each of them respond to the concept of ‘environment’.

I See You is showing at Tiwani Contemporary from 4th November - 14th January 2023

‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
03/11/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this November
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing in the capital this month
Strange Clay: Ceramic in Contemporary Art installation view

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art at Hayward Gallery

The first ever large-scale UK exhibition dedicated to the use of clay in contemporary art, this exhibition at the Southbank’s Hayward Gallery features 23 artists from around the world, all working in ceramics. Addressing such subjects as politics, the human body, architecture and social justice, the pieces on display showcase the possibilities allowed by the medium, from the most ambitious large-scale installation to eccentric abstract sculptures. The fairytale-like fantastical creatures of Klara Kristalova’s botanical installation are presented alongside David Zink Yi’s colossal squid of Untitled (Architeuthis) (2010), spanning over five metres of the gallery space’s floor. Elsewhere, Takuro Kuwata reimagines the functional object of a Japanese tea bowl - or chawan - in bright colours, oversized dimensions and organic textures. Woody De Othello’s work similarly plays with everyday items , with his pieces depicting traditional household objects twisted and anthropomorphised to create humorous works which simultaneously offer the artist’s reflections on society and race.

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art is showing at Hayward Gallery until 8th January 2023

Portrait of a Young Girl, Eaton Place, London (1955) Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror at Tate Britain

The title of Tate Britain’s new exhibition showcasing the work of British photographer Bill Brandt comes from the artist’s desire to ‘enter the mirror’ of his subjects with his work. First known for capturing observations of British life as a photojournalist in the 1930s, Brandt later became acclaimed for his landscapes, portraits and nudes, with his formal experimentation aiming to evoke the surreal beauty he saw in everyday life. Though they frequently appear to be candid, Brandt’s portraits were in fact highly composed creations; through lighting and directions of his subjects he aimed to evoke “the spell that charges the commonplace with beauty”. He developed his own film and printed his own photographs, allowing him to retroactively adjust light and dark, and alter the composition through cropping. The plumes of smoke in his piece Hail, Hell & Halifax were even added later with ink and pencil, further demonstrating the perfectionism and attention to detail inherent in Brandt’s work. Also explored  in this exhibition are the myriad inspirations behind Brandt’s work, such as Gustave Doré’s engravings of London, John Tenniel’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland, and the dramatic shadows of Expressionist cinema and, later, Orson Welles’ 1941 film Citizen Kane.

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror is showing at Tate Britain until 15th January 2023

The Horror Show promotional image

The Horror Show!: A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain at Somerset House

Halloween may be over, but Somerset House’s The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is only just getting started! This major new exhibition explores “how ideas rooted in horror have informed the last 50 years of creative rebellion”, from the socially disruptive aims of 1970s punk to modern reinterpretations and reclamations of witchcraft. Through various social transgressions and subversions, horror is able to indicate contemporary cultural anxieties, with this exhibition allowing viewers to trace evolving societal values over the last five decades. The Horror Show! splits its over 500 artworks into three acts, each interpreting different eras of Britain’s recent history through the lens of their respective horror archetypes. The first section, ‘Monster’, tracks the political turbulence of the 1970s and the social division of the 1980s with works by Chila Kumari Burman, Noel Fielding and Bauhaus among others. Following this, the exhibition’s second act ‘Ghost’ brings together works by Laura Grace Ford, David Shrigley and filmmaker Nicolas Roeg to investigate the path leading from the 1990s to the 2008 financial crash. The show concludes with ‘Witch’, celebrating the emerging younger generation and its interconnected communities - or covens - allowed by modern technology through works by such artists as Penny Slinger, Zadie Xa and Leonora Carrington. For anyone with even a passing interest in horror and/or cultural history, The Horror Show! stands as an absolute must-see.

The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is showing at Somerset House until 19th February 2023

Nharo Dzakanyarara (a quiet resistance) (2022) Virginia Chihota

I See You at Tiwani Contemporary

Opening on 4th November at Tiwani Contemporary, I See You is a group show featuring Virginia Chihota, Gideon Gomo, Masimba Hwati, Gareth Nyandoro and Portia Zvavahera, all alumni of the National Gallery School of Visual Arts and Design at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. The artists have remained close, maintaining their international careers from Harare, Addis Ababa and Vienna, with Chihota, Zvavahera, Hwati and Nyandoro receiving acclaim for representing Zimbabwe at the Venice Biennale in 2013 and 2015. I See You works as an expression of the two-decade-long friendship between these artists, utilising painting, sculpture, performance and drawing while also demonstrating the ways in which each of them respond to the concept of ‘environment’.

I See You is showing at Tiwani Contemporary from 4th November - 14th January 2023

‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
03/11/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this November
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing in the capital this month
Strange Clay: Ceramic in Contemporary Art installation view

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art at Hayward Gallery

The first ever large-scale UK exhibition dedicated to the use of clay in contemporary art, this exhibition at the Southbank’s Hayward Gallery features 23 artists from around the world, all working in ceramics. Addressing such subjects as politics, the human body, architecture and social justice, the pieces on display showcase the possibilities allowed by the medium, from the most ambitious large-scale installation to eccentric abstract sculptures. The fairytale-like fantastical creatures of Klara Kristalova’s botanical installation are presented alongside David Zink Yi’s colossal squid of Untitled (Architeuthis) (2010), spanning over five metres of the gallery space’s floor. Elsewhere, Takuro Kuwata reimagines the functional object of a Japanese tea bowl - or chawan - in bright colours, oversized dimensions and organic textures. Woody De Othello’s work similarly plays with everyday items , with his pieces depicting traditional household objects twisted and anthropomorphised to create humorous works which simultaneously offer the artist’s reflections on society and race.

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art is showing at Hayward Gallery until 8th January 2023

Portrait of a Young Girl, Eaton Place, London (1955) Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror at Tate Britain

The title of Tate Britain’s new exhibition showcasing the work of British photographer Bill Brandt comes from the artist’s desire to ‘enter the mirror’ of his subjects with his work. First known for capturing observations of British life as a photojournalist in the 1930s, Brandt later became acclaimed for his landscapes, portraits and nudes, with his formal experimentation aiming to evoke the surreal beauty he saw in everyday life. Though they frequently appear to be candid, Brandt’s portraits were in fact highly composed creations; through lighting and directions of his subjects he aimed to evoke “the spell that charges the commonplace with beauty”. He developed his own film and printed his own photographs, allowing him to retroactively adjust light and dark, and alter the composition through cropping. The plumes of smoke in his piece Hail, Hell & Halifax were even added later with ink and pencil, further demonstrating the perfectionism and attention to detail inherent in Brandt’s work. Also explored  in this exhibition are the myriad inspirations behind Brandt’s work, such as Gustave Doré’s engravings of London, John Tenniel’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland, and the dramatic shadows of Expressionist cinema and, later, Orson Welles’ 1941 film Citizen Kane.

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror is showing at Tate Britain until 15th January 2023

The Horror Show promotional image

The Horror Show!: A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain at Somerset House

Halloween may be over, but Somerset House’s The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is only just getting started! This major new exhibition explores “how ideas rooted in horror have informed the last 50 years of creative rebellion”, from the socially disruptive aims of 1970s punk to modern reinterpretations and reclamations of witchcraft. Through various social transgressions and subversions, horror is able to indicate contemporary cultural anxieties, with this exhibition allowing viewers to trace evolving societal values over the last five decades. The Horror Show! splits its over 500 artworks into three acts, each interpreting different eras of Britain’s recent history through the lens of their respective horror archetypes. The first section, ‘Monster’, tracks the political turbulence of the 1970s and the social division of the 1980s with works by Chila Kumari Burman, Noel Fielding and Bauhaus among others. Following this, the exhibition’s second act ‘Ghost’ brings together works by Laura Grace Ford, David Shrigley and filmmaker Nicolas Roeg to investigate the path leading from the 1990s to the 2008 financial crash. The show concludes with ‘Witch’, celebrating the emerging younger generation and its interconnected communities - or covens - allowed by modern technology through works by such artists as Penny Slinger, Zadie Xa and Leonora Carrington. For anyone with even a passing interest in horror and/or cultural history, The Horror Show! stands as an absolute must-see.

The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is showing at Somerset House until 19th February 2023

Nharo Dzakanyarara (a quiet resistance) (2022) Virginia Chihota

I See You at Tiwani Contemporary

Opening on 4th November at Tiwani Contemporary, I See You is a group show featuring Virginia Chihota, Gideon Gomo, Masimba Hwati, Gareth Nyandoro and Portia Zvavahera, all alumni of the National Gallery School of Visual Arts and Design at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. The artists have remained close, maintaining their international careers from Harare, Addis Ababa and Vienna, with Chihota, Zvavahera, Hwati and Nyandoro receiving acclaim for representing Zimbabwe at the Venice Biennale in 2013 and 2015. I See You works as an expression of the two-decade-long friendship between these artists, utilising painting, sculpture, performance and drawing while also demonstrating the ways in which each of them respond to the concept of ‘environment’.

I See You is showing at Tiwani Contemporary from 4th November - 14th January 2023

‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
03/11/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this November
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing in the capital this month
Strange Clay: Ceramic in Contemporary Art installation view

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art at Hayward Gallery

The first ever large-scale UK exhibition dedicated to the use of clay in contemporary art, this exhibition at the Southbank’s Hayward Gallery features 23 artists from around the world, all working in ceramics. Addressing such subjects as politics, the human body, architecture and social justice, the pieces on display showcase the possibilities allowed by the medium, from the most ambitious large-scale installation to eccentric abstract sculptures. The fairytale-like fantastical creatures of Klara Kristalova’s botanical installation are presented alongside David Zink Yi’s colossal squid of Untitled (Architeuthis) (2010), spanning over five metres of the gallery space’s floor. Elsewhere, Takuro Kuwata reimagines the functional object of a Japanese tea bowl - or chawan - in bright colours, oversized dimensions and organic textures. Woody De Othello’s work similarly plays with everyday items , with his pieces depicting traditional household objects twisted and anthropomorphised to create humorous works which simultaneously offer the artist’s reflections on society and race.

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art is showing at Hayward Gallery until 8th January 2023

Portrait of a Young Girl, Eaton Place, London (1955) Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror at Tate Britain

The title of Tate Britain’s new exhibition showcasing the work of British photographer Bill Brandt comes from the artist’s desire to ‘enter the mirror’ of his subjects with his work. First known for capturing observations of British life as a photojournalist in the 1930s, Brandt later became acclaimed for his landscapes, portraits and nudes, with his formal experimentation aiming to evoke the surreal beauty he saw in everyday life. Though they frequently appear to be candid, Brandt’s portraits were in fact highly composed creations; through lighting and directions of his subjects he aimed to evoke “the spell that charges the commonplace with beauty”. He developed his own film and printed his own photographs, allowing him to retroactively adjust light and dark, and alter the composition through cropping. The plumes of smoke in his piece Hail, Hell & Halifax were even added later with ink and pencil, further demonstrating the perfectionism and attention to detail inherent in Brandt’s work. Also explored  in this exhibition are the myriad inspirations behind Brandt’s work, such as Gustave Doré’s engravings of London, John Tenniel’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland, and the dramatic shadows of Expressionist cinema and, later, Orson Welles’ 1941 film Citizen Kane.

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror is showing at Tate Britain until 15th January 2023

The Horror Show promotional image

The Horror Show!: A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain at Somerset House

Halloween may be over, but Somerset House’s The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is only just getting started! This major new exhibition explores “how ideas rooted in horror have informed the last 50 years of creative rebellion”, from the socially disruptive aims of 1970s punk to modern reinterpretations and reclamations of witchcraft. Through various social transgressions and subversions, horror is able to indicate contemporary cultural anxieties, with this exhibition allowing viewers to trace evolving societal values over the last five decades. The Horror Show! splits its over 500 artworks into three acts, each interpreting different eras of Britain’s recent history through the lens of their respective horror archetypes. The first section, ‘Monster’, tracks the political turbulence of the 1970s and the social division of the 1980s with works by Chila Kumari Burman, Noel Fielding and Bauhaus among others. Following this, the exhibition’s second act ‘Ghost’ brings together works by Laura Grace Ford, David Shrigley and filmmaker Nicolas Roeg to investigate the path leading from the 1990s to the 2008 financial crash. The show concludes with ‘Witch’, celebrating the emerging younger generation and its interconnected communities - or covens - allowed by modern technology through works by such artists as Penny Slinger, Zadie Xa and Leonora Carrington. For anyone with even a passing interest in horror and/or cultural history, The Horror Show! stands as an absolute must-see.

The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is showing at Somerset House until 19th February 2023

Nharo Dzakanyarara (a quiet resistance) (2022) Virginia Chihota

I See You at Tiwani Contemporary

Opening on 4th November at Tiwani Contemporary, I See You is a group show featuring Virginia Chihota, Gideon Gomo, Masimba Hwati, Gareth Nyandoro and Portia Zvavahera, all alumni of the National Gallery School of Visual Arts and Design at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. The artists have remained close, maintaining their international careers from Harare, Addis Ababa and Vienna, with Chihota, Zvavahera, Hwati and Nyandoro receiving acclaim for representing Zimbabwe at the Venice Biennale in 2013 and 2015. I See You works as an expression of the two-decade-long friendship between these artists, utilising painting, sculpture, performance and drawing while also demonstrating the ways in which each of them respond to the concept of ‘environment’.

I See You is showing at Tiwani Contemporary from 4th November - 14th January 2023

‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
03/11/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this November
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing in the capital this month
Strange Clay: Ceramic in Contemporary Art installation view

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art at Hayward Gallery

The first ever large-scale UK exhibition dedicated to the use of clay in contemporary art, this exhibition at the Southbank’s Hayward Gallery features 23 artists from around the world, all working in ceramics. Addressing such subjects as politics, the human body, architecture and social justice, the pieces on display showcase the possibilities allowed by the medium, from the most ambitious large-scale installation to eccentric abstract sculptures. The fairytale-like fantastical creatures of Klara Kristalova’s botanical installation are presented alongside David Zink Yi’s colossal squid of Untitled (Architeuthis) (2010), spanning over five metres of the gallery space’s floor. Elsewhere, Takuro Kuwata reimagines the functional object of a Japanese tea bowl - or chawan - in bright colours, oversized dimensions and organic textures. Woody De Othello’s work similarly plays with everyday items , with his pieces depicting traditional household objects twisted and anthropomorphised to create humorous works which simultaneously offer the artist’s reflections on society and race.

Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art is showing at Hayward Gallery until 8th January 2023

Portrait of a Young Girl, Eaton Place, London (1955) Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror at Tate Britain

The title of Tate Britain’s new exhibition showcasing the work of British photographer Bill Brandt comes from the artist’s desire to ‘enter the mirror’ of his subjects with his work. First known for capturing observations of British life as a photojournalist in the 1930s, Brandt later became acclaimed for his landscapes, portraits and nudes, with his formal experimentation aiming to evoke the surreal beauty he saw in everyday life. Though they frequently appear to be candid, Brandt’s portraits were in fact highly composed creations; through lighting and directions of his subjects he aimed to evoke “the spell that charges the commonplace with beauty”. He developed his own film and printed his own photographs, allowing him to retroactively adjust light and dark, and alter the composition through cropping. The plumes of smoke in his piece Hail, Hell & Halifax were even added later with ink and pencil, further demonstrating the perfectionism and attention to detail inherent in Brandt’s work. Also explored  in this exhibition are the myriad inspirations behind Brandt’s work, such as Gustave Doré’s engravings of London, John Tenniel’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland, and the dramatic shadows of Expressionist cinema and, later, Orson Welles’ 1941 film Citizen Kane.

Bill Brandt: Inside the Mirror is showing at Tate Britain until 15th January 2023

The Horror Show promotional image

The Horror Show!: A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain at Somerset House

Halloween may be over, but Somerset House’s The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is only just getting started! This major new exhibition explores “how ideas rooted in horror have informed the last 50 years of creative rebellion”, from the socially disruptive aims of 1970s punk to modern reinterpretations and reclamations of witchcraft. Through various social transgressions and subversions, horror is able to indicate contemporary cultural anxieties, with this exhibition allowing viewers to trace evolving societal values over the last five decades. The Horror Show! splits its over 500 artworks into three acts, each interpreting different eras of Britain’s recent history through the lens of their respective horror archetypes. The first section, ‘Monster’, tracks the political turbulence of the 1970s and the social division of the 1980s with works by Chila Kumari Burman, Noel Fielding and Bauhaus among others. Following this, the exhibition’s second act ‘Ghost’ brings together works by Laura Grace Ford, David Shrigley and filmmaker Nicolas Roeg to investigate the path leading from the 1990s to the 2008 financial crash. The show concludes with ‘Witch’, celebrating the emerging younger generation and its interconnected communities - or covens - allowed by modern technology through works by such artists as Penny Slinger, Zadie Xa and Leonora Carrington. For anyone with even a passing interest in horror and/or cultural history, The Horror Show! stands as an absolute must-see.

The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain is showing at Somerset House until 19th February 2023

Nharo Dzakanyarara (a quiet resistance) (2022) Virginia Chihota

I See You at Tiwani Contemporary

Opening on 4th November at Tiwani Contemporary, I See You is a group show featuring Virginia Chihota, Gideon Gomo, Masimba Hwati, Gareth Nyandoro and Portia Zvavahera, all alumni of the National Gallery School of Visual Arts and Design at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. The artists have remained close, maintaining their international careers from Harare, Addis Ababa and Vienna, with Chihota, Zvavahera, Hwati and Nyandoro receiving acclaim for representing Zimbabwe at the Venice Biennale in 2013 and 2015. I See You works as an expression of the two-decade-long friendship between these artists, utilising painting, sculpture, performance and drawing while also demonstrating the ways in which each of them respond to the concept of ‘environment’.

I See You is showing at Tiwani Contemporary from 4th November - 14th January 2023

‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
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