20/12/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
Art to Support Your Mental Health
We take a look at the ways that art can support your mental wellbeing

It truly feels like COVID-19 may never end. A new variant has entered and planted itself in stage centre. Newspapers are quoting it as the most serious threat of the pandemic to date and mass hysteria is in the air. This Christmas, it is more important than ever to stay safe and act with caution. More importantly, it is vital we look after our mental health as we continue to battle and exist with this unprecedented time (can we still call it that… déjà vu more springs to mind!).

It has been well established, and scientific evidence continues to reveal, that art and creativity is an excellent method to supporting mental health and boosting our moods. A study demonstrated that creating art reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) and that it can induce positive mood states. If we don’t need that right now, I don't know when we ever will?! What can you do during this festive period that promotes our mood through creativity, I hear you ask? (Subject to restrictions).

Creating Art: Pottery Cafes

I remember as a child my favourite weekend activity or birthday bash was good old Art 4 Fun. However, activities such as creating ceramic mugs and plates is not reserved for children and is good fun for all ages! By getting your hands dirty in some pottery creations not only do you reap the benefits of cortisol reduction and mood boosting goodness, you also can create some personal Christmas gifts for whoever you choose! I promise your gift-receiver will appreciate the gesture more than a gift card or bath salts.

Immersing Yourself in Art: Go to an Exhibition

Whilst festive cheer is a welcome reprieve from the doom and gloom of the last year, Christmas can sometimes be overwhelming. The busyness, the plans, the numerous family and friend gatherings… A museum or art gallery is the perfect oasis at this bustling time of year. A quiet and calm sanctuary away from the city lights. Luckily, this winter London’s art scene is thriving. A personal favourite and recommendation is Lubaina Himid at the Tate Modern. Himid was a focal figure of the British Black arts movement in the 1980s and winner of the 2017 Turner Prize. This exhibition is the largest solo exhibition by Himid to date and encapsulates four decades of work. The Tate Modern is also currently home to Anicka Yi’s spectacular vision of new ecosystem. The work is a creative, technologically and biologically informed, installation. A trip to the Tate Modern promises to recharge your batteries before you head out to South Bank for a mulled wine and spot of Christmas market shopping.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
20/12/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
Art to Support Your Mental Health
We take a look at the ways that art can support your mental wellbeing

It truly feels like COVID-19 may never end. A new variant has entered and planted itself in stage centre. Newspapers are quoting it as the most serious threat of the pandemic to date and mass hysteria is in the air. This Christmas, it is more important than ever to stay safe and act with caution. More importantly, it is vital we look after our mental health as we continue to battle and exist with this unprecedented time (can we still call it that… déjà vu more springs to mind!).

It has been well established, and scientific evidence continues to reveal, that art and creativity is an excellent method to supporting mental health and boosting our moods. A study demonstrated that creating art reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) and that it can induce positive mood states. If we don’t need that right now, I don't know when we ever will?! What can you do during this festive period that promotes our mood through creativity, I hear you ask? (Subject to restrictions).

Creating Art: Pottery Cafes

I remember as a child my favourite weekend activity or birthday bash was good old Art 4 Fun. However, activities such as creating ceramic mugs and plates is not reserved for children and is good fun for all ages! By getting your hands dirty in some pottery creations not only do you reap the benefits of cortisol reduction and mood boosting goodness, you also can create some personal Christmas gifts for whoever you choose! I promise your gift-receiver will appreciate the gesture more than a gift card or bath salts.

Immersing Yourself in Art: Go to an Exhibition

Whilst festive cheer is a welcome reprieve from the doom and gloom of the last year, Christmas can sometimes be overwhelming. The busyness, the plans, the numerous family and friend gatherings… A museum or art gallery is the perfect oasis at this bustling time of year. A quiet and calm sanctuary away from the city lights. Luckily, this winter London’s art scene is thriving. A personal favourite and recommendation is Lubaina Himid at the Tate Modern. Himid was a focal figure of the British Black arts movement in the 1980s and winner of the 2017 Turner Prize. This exhibition is the largest solo exhibition by Himid to date and encapsulates four decades of work. The Tate Modern is also currently home to Anicka Yi’s spectacular vision of new ecosystem. The work is a creative, technologically and biologically informed, installation. A trip to the Tate Modern promises to recharge your batteries before you head out to South Bank for a mulled wine and spot of Christmas market shopping.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
20/12/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
Art to Support Your Mental Health
We take a look at the ways that art can support your mental wellbeing

It truly feels like COVID-19 may never end. A new variant has entered and planted itself in stage centre. Newspapers are quoting it as the most serious threat of the pandemic to date and mass hysteria is in the air. This Christmas, it is more important than ever to stay safe and act with caution. More importantly, it is vital we look after our mental health as we continue to battle and exist with this unprecedented time (can we still call it that… déjà vu more springs to mind!).

It has been well established, and scientific evidence continues to reveal, that art and creativity is an excellent method to supporting mental health and boosting our moods. A study demonstrated that creating art reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) and that it can induce positive mood states. If we don’t need that right now, I don't know when we ever will?! What can you do during this festive period that promotes our mood through creativity, I hear you ask? (Subject to restrictions).

Creating Art: Pottery Cafes

I remember as a child my favourite weekend activity or birthday bash was good old Art 4 Fun. However, activities such as creating ceramic mugs and plates is not reserved for children and is good fun for all ages! By getting your hands dirty in some pottery creations not only do you reap the benefits of cortisol reduction and mood boosting goodness, you also can create some personal Christmas gifts for whoever you choose! I promise your gift-receiver will appreciate the gesture more than a gift card or bath salts.

Immersing Yourself in Art: Go to an Exhibition

Whilst festive cheer is a welcome reprieve from the doom and gloom of the last year, Christmas can sometimes be overwhelming. The busyness, the plans, the numerous family and friend gatherings… A museum or art gallery is the perfect oasis at this bustling time of year. A quiet and calm sanctuary away from the city lights. Luckily, this winter London’s art scene is thriving. A personal favourite and recommendation is Lubaina Himid at the Tate Modern. Himid was a focal figure of the British Black arts movement in the 1980s and winner of the 2017 Turner Prize. This exhibition is the largest solo exhibition by Himid to date and encapsulates four decades of work. The Tate Modern is also currently home to Anicka Yi’s spectacular vision of new ecosystem. The work is a creative, technologically and biologically informed, installation. A trip to the Tate Modern promises to recharge your batteries before you head out to South Bank for a mulled wine and spot of Christmas market shopping.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
20/12/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
Art to Support Your Mental Health
We take a look at the ways that art can support your mental wellbeing

It truly feels like COVID-19 may never end. A new variant has entered and planted itself in stage centre. Newspapers are quoting it as the most serious threat of the pandemic to date and mass hysteria is in the air. This Christmas, it is more important than ever to stay safe and act with caution. More importantly, it is vital we look after our mental health as we continue to battle and exist with this unprecedented time (can we still call it that… déjà vu more springs to mind!).

It has been well established, and scientific evidence continues to reveal, that art and creativity is an excellent method to supporting mental health and boosting our moods. A study demonstrated that creating art reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) and that it can induce positive mood states. If we don’t need that right now, I don't know when we ever will?! What can you do during this festive period that promotes our mood through creativity, I hear you ask? (Subject to restrictions).

Creating Art: Pottery Cafes

I remember as a child my favourite weekend activity or birthday bash was good old Art 4 Fun. However, activities such as creating ceramic mugs and plates is not reserved for children and is good fun for all ages! By getting your hands dirty in some pottery creations not only do you reap the benefits of cortisol reduction and mood boosting goodness, you also can create some personal Christmas gifts for whoever you choose! I promise your gift-receiver will appreciate the gesture more than a gift card or bath salts.

Immersing Yourself in Art: Go to an Exhibition

Whilst festive cheer is a welcome reprieve from the doom and gloom of the last year, Christmas can sometimes be overwhelming. The busyness, the plans, the numerous family and friend gatherings… A museum or art gallery is the perfect oasis at this bustling time of year. A quiet and calm sanctuary away from the city lights. Luckily, this winter London’s art scene is thriving. A personal favourite and recommendation is Lubaina Himid at the Tate Modern. Himid was a focal figure of the British Black arts movement in the 1980s and winner of the 2017 Turner Prize. This exhibition is the largest solo exhibition by Himid to date and encapsulates four decades of work. The Tate Modern is also currently home to Anicka Yi’s spectacular vision of new ecosystem. The work is a creative, technologically and biologically informed, installation. A trip to the Tate Modern promises to recharge your batteries before you head out to South Bank for a mulled wine and spot of Christmas market shopping.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
20/12/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
Art to Support Your Mental Health
We take a look at the ways that art can support your mental wellbeing

It truly feels like COVID-19 may never end. A new variant has entered and planted itself in stage centre. Newspapers are quoting it as the most serious threat of the pandemic to date and mass hysteria is in the air. This Christmas, it is more important than ever to stay safe and act with caution. More importantly, it is vital we look after our mental health as we continue to battle and exist with this unprecedented time (can we still call it that… déjà vu more springs to mind!).

It has been well established, and scientific evidence continues to reveal, that art and creativity is an excellent method to supporting mental health and boosting our moods. A study demonstrated that creating art reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) and that it can induce positive mood states. If we don’t need that right now, I don't know when we ever will?! What can you do during this festive period that promotes our mood through creativity, I hear you ask? (Subject to restrictions).

Creating Art: Pottery Cafes

I remember as a child my favourite weekend activity or birthday bash was good old Art 4 Fun. However, activities such as creating ceramic mugs and plates is not reserved for children and is good fun for all ages! By getting your hands dirty in some pottery creations not only do you reap the benefits of cortisol reduction and mood boosting goodness, you also can create some personal Christmas gifts for whoever you choose! I promise your gift-receiver will appreciate the gesture more than a gift card or bath salts.

Immersing Yourself in Art: Go to an Exhibition

Whilst festive cheer is a welcome reprieve from the doom and gloom of the last year, Christmas can sometimes be overwhelming. The busyness, the plans, the numerous family and friend gatherings… A museum or art gallery is the perfect oasis at this bustling time of year. A quiet and calm sanctuary away from the city lights. Luckily, this winter London’s art scene is thriving. A personal favourite and recommendation is Lubaina Himid at the Tate Modern. Himid was a focal figure of the British Black arts movement in the 1980s and winner of the 2017 Turner Prize. This exhibition is the largest solo exhibition by Himid to date and encapsulates four decades of work. The Tate Modern is also currently home to Anicka Yi’s spectacular vision of new ecosystem. The work is a creative, technologically and biologically informed, installation. A trip to the Tate Modern promises to recharge your batteries before you head out to South Bank for a mulled wine and spot of Christmas market shopping.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
20/12/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
Art to Support Your Mental Health

It truly feels like COVID-19 may never end. A new variant has entered and planted itself in stage centre. Newspapers are quoting it as the most serious threat of the pandemic to date and mass hysteria is in the air. This Christmas, it is more important than ever to stay safe and act with caution. More importantly, it is vital we look after our mental health as we continue to battle and exist with this unprecedented time (can we still call it that… déjà vu more springs to mind!).

It has been well established, and scientific evidence continues to reveal, that art and creativity is an excellent method to supporting mental health and boosting our moods. A study demonstrated that creating art reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) and that it can induce positive mood states. If we don’t need that right now, I don't know when we ever will?! What can you do during this festive period that promotes our mood through creativity, I hear you ask? (Subject to restrictions).

Creating Art: Pottery Cafes

I remember as a child my favourite weekend activity or birthday bash was good old Art 4 Fun. However, activities such as creating ceramic mugs and plates is not reserved for children and is good fun for all ages! By getting your hands dirty in some pottery creations not only do you reap the benefits of cortisol reduction and mood boosting goodness, you also can create some personal Christmas gifts for whoever you choose! I promise your gift-receiver will appreciate the gesture more than a gift card or bath salts.

Immersing Yourself in Art: Go to an Exhibition

Whilst festive cheer is a welcome reprieve from the doom and gloom of the last year, Christmas can sometimes be overwhelming. The busyness, the plans, the numerous family and friend gatherings… A museum or art gallery is the perfect oasis at this bustling time of year. A quiet and calm sanctuary away from the city lights. Luckily, this winter London’s art scene is thriving. A personal favourite and recommendation is Lubaina Himid at the Tate Modern. Himid was a focal figure of the British Black arts movement in the 1980s and winner of the 2017 Turner Prize. This exhibition is the largest solo exhibition by Himid to date and encapsulates four decades of work. The Tate Modern is also currently home to Anicka Yi’s spectacular vision of new ecosystem. The work is a creative, technologically and biologically informed, installation. A trip to the Tate Modern promises to recharge your batteries before you head out to South Bank for a mulled wine and spot of Christmas market shopping.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
20/12/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
Art to Support Your Mental Health
We take a look at the ways that art can support your mental wellbeing

It truly feels like COVID-19 may never end. A new variant has entered and planted itself in stage centre. Newspapers are quoting it as the most serious threat of the pandemic to date and mass hysteria is in the air. This Christmas, it is more important than ever to stay safe and act with caution. More importantly, it is vital we look after our mental health as we continue to battle and exist with this unprecedented time (can we still call it that… déjà vu more springs to mind!).

It has been well established, and scientific evidence continues to reveal, that art and creativity is an excellent method to supporting mental health and boosting our moods. A study demonstrated that creating art reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) and that it can induce positive mood states. If we don’t need that right now, I don't know when we ever will?! What can you do during this festive period that promotes our mood through creativity, I hear you ask? (Subject to restrictions).

Creating Art: Pottery Cafes

I remember as a child my favourite weekend activity or birthday bash was good old Art 4 Fun. However, activities such as creating ceramic mugs and plates is not reserved for children and is good fun for all ages! By getting your hands dirty in some pottery creations not only do you reap the benefits of cortisol reduction and mood boosting goodness, you also can create some personal Christmas gifts for whoever you choose! I promise your gift-receiver will appreciate the gesture more than a gift card or bath salts.

Immersing Yourself in Art: Go to an Exhibition

Whilst festive cheer is a welcome reprieve from the doom and gloom of the last year, Christmas can sometimes be overwhelming. The busyness, the plans, the numerous family and friend gatherings… A museum or art gallery is the perfect oasis at this bustling time of year. A quiet and calm sanctuary away from the city lights. Luckily, this winter London’s art scene is thriving. A personal favourite and recommendation is Lubaina Himid at the Tate Modern. Himid was a focal figure of the British Black arts movement in the 1980s and winner of the 2017 Turner Prize. This exhibition is the largest solo exhibition by Himid to date and encapsulates four decades of work. The Tate Modern is also currently home to Anicka Yi’s spectacular vision of new ecosystem. The work is a creative, technologically and biologically informed, installation. A trip to the Tate Modern promises to recharge your batteries before you head out to South Bank for a mulled wine and spot of Christmas market shopping.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
20/12/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
Art to Support Your Mental Health
We take a look at the ways that art can support your mental wellbeing

It truly feels like COVID-19 may never end. A new variant has entered and planted itself in stage centre. Newspapers are quoting it as the most serious threat of the pandemic to date and mass hysteria is in the air. This Christmas, it is more important than ever to stay safe and act with caution. More importantly, it is vital we look after our mental health as we continue to battle and exist with this unprecedented time (can we still call it that… déjà vu more springs to mind!).

It has been well established, and scientific evidence continues to reveal, that art and creativity is an excellent method to supporting mental health and boosting our moods. A study demonstrated that creating art reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) and that it can induce positive mood states. If we don’t need that right now, I don't know when we ever will?! What can you do during this festive period that promotes our mood through creativity, I hear you ask? (Subject to restrictions).

Creating Art: Pottery Cafes

I remember as a child my favourite weekend activity or birthday bash was good old Art 4 Fun. However, activities such as creating ceramic mugs and plates is not reserved for children and is good fun for all ages! By getting your hands dirty in some pottery creations not only do you reap the benefits of cortisol reduction and mood boosting goodness, you also can create some personal Christmas gifts for whoever you choose! I promise your gift-receiver will appreciate the gesture more than a gift card or bath salts.

Immersing Yourself in Art: Go to an Exhibition

Whilst festive cheer is a welcome reprieve from the doom and gloom of the last year, Christmas can sometimes be overwhelming. The busyness, the plans, the numerous family and friend gatherings… A museum or art gallery is the perfect oasis at this bustling time of year. A quiet and calm sanctuary away from the city lights. Luckily, this winter London’s art scene is thriving. A personal favourite and recommendation is Lubaina Himid at the Tate Modern. Himid was a focal figure of the British Black arts movement in the 1980s and winner of the 2017 Turner Prize. This exhibition is the largest solo exhibition by Himid to date and encapsulates four decades of work. The Tate Modern is also currently home to Anicka Yi’s spectacular vision of new ecosystem. The work is a creative, technologically and biologically informed, installation. A trip to the Tate Modern promises to recharge your batteries before you head out to South Bank for a mulled wine and spot of Christmas market shopping.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
20/12/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
Art to Support Your Mental Health
We take a look at the ways that art can support your mental wellbeing

It truly feels like COVID-19 may never end. A new variant has entered and planted itself in stage centre. Newspapers are quoting it as the most serious threat of the pandemic to date and mass hysteria is in the air. This Christmas, it is more important than ever to stay safe and act with caution. More importantly, it is vital we look after our mental health as we continue to battle and exist with this unprecedented time (can we still call it that… déjà vu more springs to mind!).

It has been well established, and scientific evidence continues to reveal, that art and creativity is an excellent method to supporting mental health and boosting our moods. A study demonstrated that creating art reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) and that it can induce positive mood states. If we don’t need that right now, I don't know when we ever will?! What can you do during this festive period that promotes our mood through creativity, I hear you ask? (Subject to restrictions).

Creating Art: Pottery Cafes

I remember as a child my favourite weekend activity or birthday bash was good old Art 4 Fun. However, activities such as creating ceramic mugs and plates is not reserved for children and is good fun for all ages! By getting your hands dirty in some pottery creations not only do you reap the benefits of cortisol reduction and mood boosting goodness, you also can create some personal Christmas gifts for whoever you choose! I promise your gift-receiver will appreciate the gesture more than a gift card or bath salts.

Immersing Yourself in Art: Go to an Exhibition

Whilst festive cheer is a welcome reprieve from the doom and gloom of the last year, Christmas can sometimes be overwhelming. The busyness, the plans, the numerous family and friend gatherings… A museum or art gallery is the perfect oasis at this bustling time of year. A quiet and calm sanctuary away from the city lights. Luckily, this winter London’s art scene is thriving. A personal favourite and recommendation is Lubaina Himid at the Tate Modern. Himid was a focal figure of the British Black arts movement in the 1980s and winner of the 2017 Turner Prize. This exhibition is the largest solo exhibition by Himid to date and encapsulates four decades of work. The Tate Modern is also currently home to Anicka Yi’s spectacular vision of new ecosystem. The work is a creative, technologically and biologically informed, installation. A trip to the Tate Modern promises to recharge your batteries before you head out to South Bank for a mulled wine and spot of Christmas market shopping.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
20/12/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
Art to Support Your Mental Health
We take a look at the ways that art can support your mental wellbeing

It truly feels like COVID-19 may never end. A new variant has entered and planted itself in stage centre. Newspapers are quoting it as the most serious threat of the pandemic to date and mass hysteria is in the air. This Christmas, it is more important than ever to stay safe and act with caution. More importantly, it is vital we look after our mental health as we continue to battle and exist with this unprecedented time (can we still call it that… déjà vu more springs to mind!).

It has been well established, and scientific evidence continues to reveal, that art and creativity is an excellent method to supporting mental health and boosting our moods. A study demonstrated that creating art reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) and that it can induce positive mood states. If we don’t need that right now, I don't know when we ever will?! What can you do during this festive period that promotes our mood through creativity, I hear you ask? (Subject to restrictions).

Creating Art: Pottery Cafes

I remember as a child my favourite weekend activity or birthday bash was good old Art 4 Fun. However, activities such as creating ceramic mugs and plates is not reserved for children and is good fun for all ages! By getting your hands dirty in some pottery creations not only do you reap the benefits of cortisol reduction and mood boosting goodness, you also can create some personal Christmas gifts for whoever you choose! I promise your gift-receiver will appreciate the gesture more than a gift card or bath salts.

Immersing Yourself in Art: Go to an Exhibition

Whilst festive cheer is a welcome reprieve from the doom and gloom of the last year, Christmas can sometimes be overwhelming. The busyness, the plans, the numerous family and friend gatherings… A museum or art gallery is the perfect oasis at this bustling time of year. A quiet and calm sanctuary away from the city lights. Luckily, this winter London’s art scene is thriving. A personal favourite and recommendation is Lubaina Himid at the Tate Modern. Himid was a focal figure of the British Black arts movement in the 1980s and winner of the 2017 Turner Prize. This exhibition is the largest solo exhibition by Himid to date and encapsulates four decades of work. The Tate Modern is also currently home to Anicka Yi’s spectacular vision of new ecosystem. The work is a creative, technologically and biologically informed, installation. A trip to the Tate Modern promises to recharge your batteries before you head out to South Bank for a mulled wine and spot of Christmas market shopping.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
Thanks For Reading
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