07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this June
We give our guide to the best exhibitions showing in London over the coming month...

Melancholy, Edvard Munch, 1894-96

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen at The Courtauld

Showing at the Courtauld’s Denise Coates Exhibition Galleries, Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen marks the first ever UK exhibition of the KODE art museum’s collection of Munch paintings. Originally curated by Norwegian industrialist Rasmus Meyer in the early twentieth century, this exhibition serves not only as the first display of these 18 works in the UK, but anywhere outside of Norway. With its permanent collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings which inspired Munch, The Courtauld provides the perfect space to give historical and artistic context to the artist’s work in display; beginning with his ‘realist’ work from the 1880s - such as Morning (1884) and Summer Night (1889) - and moving on to the expressive, visceral portraits of the human psyche later on in his career such as Evening on Karl Johan (1892), Melancholy (1894-96) and At the Death Bed (1895), this exhibition provides a rare display of one of the most important collections of Munch’s work.

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen is showing at The Courtauld until 4th September

Our Time on Earth installation view

Our Time on Earth at Barbican

Guest curators Caroline Till and Kate Franklin have transformed The Curve at Barbican in an organic, thought-provoking series of rooms, each one providing a window into an imagined future. Each room considers the future through a different lens, though most take the profound and impending effects humans have made on our ecosystem into account. Other themes investigated include the fluidity of identity, the rewilding of urban spaces and the relationship between humans and other species who inhabit the planet. Many of the pieces encourage active interaction with dynamic displays; a short digital game sees visitors control various natural organisms across millennia, while another tracks the bodies of passers-by and recreates their movements with organic matter, barely recognisable as human. Utilising modern technology to issue a stark warning about the near future, Our Time on Earth is a sobering but hopeful exhibition encouraging active change in the face of the climate crisis.

Our Time on Earth is showing at Barbican until 29th August

The Birth of Melpomene, Jim Shaw, 2022

Haunted Realism at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill

This exhibition at Gagosian’s Grosvenor Hill location takes its name from Jacques Derrida’s concept of ‘hauntology’, as coined in his 1993 book Specters of Marx as an investigation of Marxism’s frequent “haunt[ing of] Western society from beyond the grave”. The concept is investigated here by the bringing together of various depictions of modernity throughout the ages, prompting viewers to consider what these pieces can tell us about those ages’ aspirations, or ‘lost futures’, perhaps complimenting the previously-mentioned exhibition at Barbican. Featuring work by over thirty artists including Meleko Mokgosi, Ed Ruscha, Jenny Saville, and Tatiana Trouvé, this group exhibition encourages an investigation into historical overlap and disjunction in such varied fields as anthropology, philosophy, film, electronic music, and visual art. In defining the subject of their exhibition, the curators of Haunted Realism quote Mark Fisher, from whom the exhibition draws significant inspiration, who notes that “What haunts the digital cul-de-sacs of the twenty-first century is not so much the past as all the lost futures that the twentieth century taught us to anticipate”.

Haunted Realism is showing at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill until 26th August

Enclosures, Jesse Darling, installation view

Jesse Darling: Enclosures at Camden Art Centre

The fourth recipient of the Camden Art Centre Freelands Lomax Fellowship is Jesse Darling, whose multimedia art spans installation, sound, text, film and performance. This new commission serves as the result of two years of research into the inherently varied nature of humanity, society and technologies, and their potential - and shortcomings - in adapting to accommodate vulnerability. Their work also investigates the limitations of binary thinking in regard to the human body, facilitating a wider consideration of the human condition as a whole. In their use of clay throughout this exhibition, Darling considers the material to be similarly multifaceted for its use in architecture, artistic practice, and various forms of cultural and historical relevance in its relation to the human body. Throughout their 10 year career so far, Darling has considered the ephemerality of being and the inevitability of decay, and this exhibition serves as something of a treatise on the subject.

Jesse Darling: Enclosures is showing at Camden Art Centre until 26th June

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this June
We give our guide to the best exhibitions showing in London over the coming month...

Melancholy, Edvard Munch, 1894-96

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen at The Courtauld

Showing at the Courtauld’s Denise Coates Exhibition Galleries, Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen marks the first ever UK exhibition of the KODE art museum’s collection of Munch paintings. Originally curated by Norwegian industrialist Rasmus Meyer in the early twentieth century, this exhibition serves not only as the first display of these 18 works in the UK, but anywhere outside of Norway. With its permanent collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings which inspired Munch, The Courtauld provides the perfect space to give historical and artistic context to the artist’s work in display; beginning with his ‘realist’ work from the 1880s - such as Morning (1884) and Summer Night (1889) - and moving on to the expressive, visceral portraits of the human psyche later on in his career such as Evening on Karl Johan (1892), Melancholy (1894-96) and At the Death Bed (1895), this exhibition provides a rare display of one of the most important collections of Munch’s work.

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen is showing at The Courtauld until 4th September

Our Time on Earth installation view

Our Time on Earth at Barbican

Guest curators Caroline Till and Kate Franklin have transformed The Curve at Barbican in an organic, thought-provoking series of rooms, each one providing a window into an imagined future. Each room considers the future through a different lens, though most take the profound and impending effects humans have made on our ecosystem into account. Other themes investigated include the fluidity of identity, the rewilding of urban spaces and the relationship between humans and other species who inhabit the planet. Many of the pieces encourage active interaction with dynamic displays; a short digital game sees visitors control various natural organisms across millennia, while another tracks the bodies of passers-by and recreates their movements with organic matter, barely recognisable as human. Utilising modern technology to issue a stark warning about the near future, Our Time on Earth is a sobering but hopeful exhibition encouraging active change in the face of the climate crisis.

Our Time on Earth is showing at Barbican until 29th August

The Birth of Melpomene, Jim Shaw, 2022

Haunted Realism at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill

This exhibition at Gagosian’s Grosvenor Hill location takes its name from Jacques Derrida’s concept of ‘hauntology’, as coined in his 1993 book Specters of Marx as an investigation of Marxism’s frequent “haunt[ing of] Western society from beyond the grave”. The concept is investigated here by the bringing together of various depictions of modernity throughout the ages, prompting viewers to consider what these pieces can tell us about those ages’ aspirations, or ‘lost futures’, perhaps complimenting the previously-mentioned exhibition at Barbican. Featuring work by over thirty artists including Meleko Mokgosi, Ed Ruscha, Jenny Saville, and Tatiana Trouvé, this group exhibition encourages an investigation into historical overlap and disjunction in such varied fields as anthropology, philosophy, film, electronic music, and visual art. In defining the subject of their exhibition, the curators of Haunted Realism quote Mark Fisher, from whom the exhibition draws significant inspiration, who notes that “What haunts the digital cul-de-sacs of the twenty-first century is not so much the past as all the lost futures that the twentieth century taught us to anticipate”.

Haunted Realism is showing at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill until 26th August

Enclosures, Jesse Darling, installation view

Jesse Darling: Enclosures at Camden Art Centre

The fourth recipient of the Camden Art Centre Freelands Lomax Fellowship is Jesse Darling, whose multimedia art spans installation, sound, text, film and performance. This new commission serves as the result of two years of research into the inherently varied nature of humanity, society and technologies, and their potential - and shortcomings - in adapting to accommodate vulnerability. Their work also investigates the limitations of binary thinking in regard to the human body, facilitating a wider consideration of the human condition as a whole. In their use of clay throughout this exhibition, Darling considers the material to be similarly multifaceted for its use in architecture, artistic practice, and various forms of cultural and historical relevance in its relation to the human body. Throughout their 10 year career so far, Darling has considered the ephemerality of being and the inevitability of decay, and this exhibition serves as something of a treatise on the subject.

Jesse Darling: Enclosures is showing at Camden Art Centre until 26th June

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this June
We give our guide to the best exhibitions showing in London over the coming month...

Melancholy, Edvard Munch, 1894-96

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen at The Courtauld

Showing at the Courtauld’s Denise Coates Exhibition Galleries, Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen marks the first ever UK exhibition of the KODE art museum’s collection of Munch paintings. Originally curated by Norwegian industrialist Rasmus Meyer in the early twentieth century, this exhibition serves not only as the first display of these 18 works in the UK, but anywhere outside of Norway. With its permanent collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings which inspired Munch, The Courtauld provides the perfect space to give historical and artistic context to the artist’s work in display; beginning with his ‘realist’ work from the 1880s - such as Morning (1884) and Summer Night (1889) - and moving on to the expressive, visceral portraits of the human psyche later on in his career such as Evening on Karl Johan (1892), Melancholy (1894-96) and At the Death Bed (1895), this exhibition provides a rare display of one of the most important collections of Munch’s work.

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen is showing at The Courtauld until 4th September

Our Time on Earth installation view

Our Time on Earth at Barbican

Guest curators Caroline Till and Kate Franklin have transformed The Curve at Barbican in an organic, thought-provoking series of rooms, each one providing a window into an imagined future. Each room considers the future through a different lens, though most take the profound and impending effects humans have made on our ecosystem into account. Other themes investigated include the fluidity of identity, the rewilding of urban spaces and the relationship between humans and other species who inhabit the planet. Many of the pieces encourage active interaction with dynamic displays; a short digital game sees visitors control various natural organisms across millennia, while another tracks the bodies of passers-by and recreates their movements with organic matter, barely recognisable as human. Utilising modern technology to issue a stark warning about the near future, Our Time on Earth is a sobering but hopeful exhibition encouraging active change in the face of the climate crisis.

Our Time on Earth is showing at Barbican until 29th August

The Birth of Melpomene, Jim Shaw, 2022

Haunted Realism at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill

This exhibition at Gagosian’s Grosvenor Hill location takes its name from Jacques Derrida’s concept of ‘hauntology’, as coined in his 1993 book Specters of Marx as an investigation of Marxism’s frequent “haunt[ing of] Western society from beyond the grave”. The concept is investigated here by the bringing together of various depictions of modernity throughout the ages, prompting viewers to consider what these pieces can tell us about those ages’ aspirations, or ‘lost futures’, perhaps complimenting the previously-mentioned exhibition at Barbican. Featuring work by over thirty artists including Meleko Mokgosi, Ed Ruscha, Jenny Saville, and Tatiana Trouvé, this group exhibition encourages an investigation into historical overlap and disjunction in such varied fields as anthropology, philosophy, film, electronic music, and visual art. In defining the subject of their exhibition, the curators of Haunted Realism quote Mark Fisher, from whom the exhibition draws significant inspiration, who notes that “What haunts the digital cul-de-sacs of the twenty-first century is not so much the past as all the lost futures that the twentieth century taught us to anticipate”.

Haunted Realism is showing at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill until 26th August

Enclosures, Jesse Darling, installation view

Jesse Darling: Enclosures at Camden Art Centre

The fourth recipient of the Camden Art Centre Freelands Lomax Fellowship is Jesse Darling, whose multimedia art spans installation, sound, text, film and performance. This new commission serves as the result of two years of research into the inherently varied nature of humanity, society and technologies, and their potential - and shortcomings - in adapting to accommodate vulnerability. Their work also investigates the limitations of binary thinking in regard to the human body, facilitating a wider consideration of the human condition as a whole. In their use of clay throughout this exhibition, Darling considers the material to be similarly multifaceted for its use in architecture, artistic practice, and various forms of cultural and historical relevance in its relation to the human body. Throughout their 10 year career so far, Darling has considered the ephemerality of being and the inevitability of decay, and this exhibition serves as something of a treatise on the subject.

Jesse Darling: Enclosures is showing at Camden Art Centre until 26th June

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this June
We give our guide to the best exhibitions showing in London over the coming month...

Melancholy, Edvard Munch, 1894-96

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen at The Courtauld

Showing at the Courtauld’s Denise Coates Exhibition Galleries, Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen marks the first ever UK exhibition of the KODE art museum’s collection of Munch paintings. Originally curated by Norwegian industrialist Rasmus Meyer in the early twentieth century, this exhibition serves not only as the first display of these 18 works in the UK, but anywhere outside of Norway. With its permanent collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings which inspired Munch, The Courtauld provides the perfect space to give historical and artistic context to the artist’s work in display; beginning with his ‘realist’ work from the 1880s - such as Morning (1884) and Summer Night (1889) - and moving on to the expressive, visceral portraits of the human psyche later on in his career such as Evening on Karl Johan (1892), Melancholy (1894-96) and At the Death Bed (1895), this exhibition provides a rare display of one of the most important collections of Munch’s work.

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen is showing at The Courtauld until 4th September

Our Time on Earth installation view

Our Time on Earth at Barbican

Guest curators Caroline Till and Kate Franklin have transformed The Curve at Barbican in an organic, thought-provoking series of rooms, each one providing a window into an imagined future. Each room considers the future through a different lens, though most take the profound and impending effects humans have made on our ecosystem into account. Other themes investigated include the fluidity of identity, the rewilding of urban spaces and the relationship between humans and other species who inhabit the planet. Many of the pieces encourage active interaction with dynamic displays; a short digital game sees visitors control various natural organisms across millennia, while another tracks the bodies of passers-by and recreates their movements with organic matter, barely recognisable as human. Utilising modern technology to issue a stark warning about the near future, Our Time on Earth is a sobering but hopeful exhibition encouraging active change in the face of the climate crisis.

Our Time on Earth is showing at Barbican until 29th August

The Birth of Melpomene, Jim Shaw, 2022

Haunted Realism at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill

This exhibition at Gagosian’s Grosvenor Hill location takes its name from Jacques Derrida’s concept of ‘hauntology’, as coined in his 1993 book Specters of Marx as an investigation of Marxism’s frequent “haunt[ing of] Western society from beyond the grave”. The concept is investigated here by the bringing together of various depictions of modernity throughout the ages, prompting viewers to consider what these pieces can tell us about those ages’ aspirations, or ‘lost futures’, perhaps complimenting the previously-mentioned exhibition at Barbican. Featuring work by over thirty artists including Meleko Mokgosi, Ed Ruscha, Jenny Saville, and Tatiana Trouvé, this group exhibition encourages an investigation into historical overlap and disjunction in such varied fields as anthropology, philosophy, film, electronic music, and visual art. In defining the subject of their exhibition, the curators of Haunted Realism quote Mark Fisher, from whom the exhibition draws significant inspiration, who notes that “What haunts the digital cul-de-sacs of the twenty-first century is not so much the past as all the lost futures that the twentieth century taught us to anticipate”.

Haunted Realism is showing at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill until 26th August

Enclosures, Jesse Darling, installation view

Jesse Darling: Enclosures at Camden Art Centre

The fourth recipient of the Camden Art Centre Freelands Lomax Fellowship is Jesse Darling, whose multimedia art spans installation, sound, text, film and performance. This new commission serves as the result of two years of research into the inherently varied nature of humanity, society and technologies, and their potential - and shortcomings - in adapting to accommodate vulnerability. Their work also investigates the limitations of binary thinking in regard to the human body, facilitating a wider consideration of the human condition as a whole. In their use of clay throughout this exhibition, Darling considers the material to be similarly multifaceted for its use in architecture, artistic practice, and various forms of cultural and historical relevance in its relation to the human body. Throughout their 10 year career so far, Darling has considered the ephemerality of being and the inevitability of decay, and this exhibition serves as something of a treatise on the subject.

Jesse Darling: Enclosures is showing at Camden Art Centre until 26th June

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this June
We give our guide to the best exhibitions showing in London over the coming month...

Melancholy, Edvard Munch, 1894-96

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen at The Courtauld

Showing at the Courtauld’s Denise Coates Exhibition Galleries, Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen marks the first ever UK exhibition of the KODE art museum’s collection of Munch paintings. Originally curated by Norwegian industrialist Rasmus Meyer in the early twentieth century, this exhibition serves not only as the first display of these 18 works in the UK, but anywhere outside of Norway. With its permanent collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings which inspired Munch, The Courtauld provides the perfect space to give historical and artistic context to the artist’s work in display; beginning with his ‘realist’ work from the 1880s - such as Morning (1884) and Summer Night (1889) - and moving on to the expressive, visceral portraits of the human psyche later on in his career such as Evening on Karl Johan (1892), Melancholy (1894-96) and At the Death Bed (1895), this exhibition provides a rare display of one of the most important collections of Munch’s work.

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen is showing at The Courtauld until 4th September

Our Time on Earth installation view

Our Time on Earth at Barbican

Guest curators Caroline Till and Kate Franklin have transformed The Curve at Barbican in an organic, thought-provoking series of rooms, each one providing a window into an imagined future. Each room considers the future through a different lens, though most take the profound and impending effects humans have made on our ecosystem into account. Other themes investigated include the fluidity of identity, the rewilding of urban spaces and the relationship between humans and other species who inhabit the planet. Many of the pieces encourage active interaction with dynamic displays; a short digital game sees visitors control various natural organisms across millennia, while another tracks the bodies of passers-by and recreates their movements with organic matter, barely recognisable as human. Utilising modern technology to issue a stark warning about the near future, Our Time on Earth is a sobering but hopeful exhibition encouraging active change in the face of the climate crisis.

Our Time on Earth is showing at Barbican until 29th August

The Birth of Melpomene, Jim Shaw, 2022

Haunted Realism at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill

This exhibition at Gagosian’s Grosvenor Hill location takes its name from Jacques Derrida’s concept of ‘hauntology’, as coined in his 1993 book Specters of Marx as an investigation of Marxism’s frequent “haunt[ing of] Western society from beyond the grave”. The concept is investigated here by the bringing together of various depictions of modernity throughout the ages, prompting viewers to consider what these pieces can tell us about those ages’ aspirations, or ‘lost futures’, perhaps complimenting the previously-mentioned exhibition at Barbican. Featuring work by over thirty artists including Meleko Mokgosi, Ed Ruscha, Jenny Saville, and Tatiana Trouvé, this group exhibition encourages an investigation into historical overlap and disjunction in such varied fields as anthropology, philosophy, film, electronic music, and visual art. In defining the subject of their exhibition, the curators of Haunted Realism quote Mark Fisher, from whom the exhibition draws significant inspiration, who notes that “What haunts the digital cul-de-sacs of the twenty-first century is not so much the past as all the lost futures that the twentieth century taught us to anticipate”.

Haunted Realism is showing at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill until 26th August

Enclosures, Jesse Darling, installation view

Jesse Darling: Enclosures at Camden Art Centre

The fourth recipient of the Camden Art Centre Freelands Lomax Fellowship is Jesse Darling, whose multimedia art spans installation, sound, text, film and performance. This new commission serves as the result of two years of research into the inherently varied nature of humanity, society and technologies, and their potential - and shortcomings - in adapting to accommodate vulnerability. Their work also investigates the limitations of binary thinking in regard to the human body, facilitating a wider consideration of the human condition as a whole. In their use of clay throughout this exhibition, Darling considers the material to be similarly multifaceted for its use in architecture, artistic practice, and various forms of cultural and historical relevance in its relation to the human body. Throughout their 10 year career so far, Darling has considered the ephemerality of being and the inevitability of decay, and this exhibition serves as something of a treatise on the subject.

Jesse Darling: Enclosures is showing at Camden Art Centre until 26th June

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this June

Melancholy, Edvard Munch, 1894-96

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen at The Courtauld

Showing at the Courtauld’s Denise Coates Exhibition Galleries, Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen marks the first ever UK exhibition of the KODE art museum’s collection of Munch paintings. Originally curated by Norwegian industrialist Rasmus Meyer in the early twentieth century, this exhibition serves not only as the first display of these 18 works in the UK, but anywhere outside of Norway. With its permanent collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings which inspired Munch, The Courtauld provides the perfect space to give historical and artistic context to the artist’s work in display; beginning with his ‘realist’ work from the 1880s - such as Morning (1884) and Summer Night (1889) - and moving on to the expressive, visceral portraits of the human psyche later on in his career such as Evening on Karl Johan (1892), Melancholy (1894-96) and At the Death Bed (1895), this exhibition provides a rare display of one of the most important collections of Munch’s work.

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen is showing at The Courtauld until 4th September

Our Time on Earth installation view

Our Time on Earth at Barbican

Guest curators Caroline Till and Kate Franklin have transformed The Curve at Barbican in an organic, thought-provoking series of rooms, each one providing a window into an imagined future. Each room considers the future through a different lens, though most take the profound and impending effects humans have made on our ecosystem into account. Other themes investigated include the fluidity of identity, the rewilding of urban spaces and the relationship between humans and other species who inhabit the planet. Many of the pieces encourage active interaction with dynamic displays; a short digital game sees visitors control various natural organisms across millennia, while another tracks the bodies of passers-by and recreates their movements with organic matter, barely recognisable as human. Utilising modern technology to issue a stark warning about the near future, Our Time on Earth is a sobering but hopeful exhibition encouraging active change in the face of the climate crisis.

Our Time on Earth is showing at Barbican until 29th August

The Birth of Melpomene, Jim Shaw, 2022

Haunted Realism at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill

This exhibition at Gagosian’s Grosvenor Hill location takes its name from Jacques Derrida’s concept of ‘hauntology’, as coined in his 1993 book Specters of Marx as an investigation of Marxism’s frequent “haunt[ing of] Western society from beyond the grave”. The concept is investigated here by the bringing together of various depictions of modernity throughout the ages, prompting viewers to consider what these pieces can tell us about those ages’ aspirations, or ‘lost futures’, perhaps complimenting the previously-mentioned exhibition at Barbican. Featuring work by over thirty artists including Meleko Mokgosi, Ed Ruscha, Jenny Saville, and Tatiana Trouvé, this group exhibition encourages an investigation into historical overlap and disjunction in such varied fields as anthropology, philosophy, film, electronic music, and visual art. In defining the subject of their exhibition, the curators of Haunted Realism quote Mark Fisher, from whom the exhibition draws significant inspiration, who notes that “What haunts the digital cul-de-sacs of the twenty-first century is not so much the past as all the lost futures that the twentieth century taught us to anticipate”.

Haunted Realism is showing at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill until 26th August

Enclosures, Jesse Darling, installation view

Jesse Darling: Enclosures at Camden Art Centre

The fourth recipient of the Camden Art Centre Freelands Lomax Fellowship is Jesse Darling, whose multimedia art spans installation, sound, text, film and performance. This new commission serves as the result of two years of research into the inherently varied nature of humanity, society and technologies, and their potential - and shortcomings - in adapting to accommodate vulnerability. Their work also investigates the limitations of binary thinking in regard to the human body, facilitating a wider consideration of the human condition as a whole. In their use of clay throughout this exhibition, Darling considers the material to be similarly multifaceted for its use in architecture, artistic practice, and various forms of cultural and historical relevance in its relation to the human body. Throughout their 10 year career so far, Darling has considered the ephemerality of being and the inevitability of decay, and this exhibition serves as something of a treatise on the subject.

Jesse Darling: Enclosures is showing at Camden Art Centre until 26th June

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this June
We give our guide to the best exhibitions showing in London over the coming month...

Melancholy, Edvard Munch, 1894-96

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen at The Courtauld

Showing at the Courtauld’s Denise Coates Exhibition Galleries, Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen marks the first ever UK exhibition of the KODE art museum’s collection of Munch paintings. Originally curated by Norwegian industrialist Rasmus Meyer in the early twentieth century, this exhibition serves not only as the first display of these 18 works in the UK, but anywhere outside of Norway. With its permanent collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings which inspired Munch, The Courtauld provides the perfect space to give historical and artistic context to the artist’s work in display; beginning with his ‘realist’ work from the 1880s - such as Morning (1884) and Summer Night (1889) - and moving on to the expressive, visceral portraits of the human psyche later on in his career such as Evening on Karl Johan (1892), Melancholy (1894-96) and At the Death Bed (1895), this exhibition provides a rare display of one of the most important collections of Munch’s work.

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen is showing at The Courtauld until 4th September

Our Time on Earth installation view

Our Time on Earth at Barbican

Guest curators Caroline Till and Kate Franklin have transformed The Curve at Barbican in an organic, thought-provoking series of rooms, each one providing a window into an imagined future. Each room considers the future through a different lens, though most take the profound and impending effects humans have made on our ecosystem into account. Other themes investigated include the fluidity of identity, the rewilding of urban spaces and the relationship between humans and other species who inhabit the planet. Many of the pieces encourage active interaction with dynamic displays; a short digital game sees visitors control various natural organisms across millennia, while another tracks the bodies of passers-by and recreates their movements with organic matter, barely recognisable as human. Utilising modern technology to issue a stark warning about the near future, Our Time on Earth is a sobering but hopeful exhibition encouraging active change in the face of the climate crisis.

Our Time on Earth is showing at Barbican until 29th August

The Birth of Melpomene, Jim Shaw, 2022

Haunted Realism at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill

This exhibition at Gagosian’s Grosvenor Hill location takes its name from Jacques Derrida’s concept of ‘hauntology’, as coined in his 1993 book Specters of Marx as an investigation of Marxism’s frequent “haunt[ing of] Western society from beyond the grave”. The concept is investigated here by the bringing together of various depictions of modernity throughout the ages, prompting viewers to consider what these pieces can tell us about those ages’ aspirations, or ‘lost futures’, perhaps complimenting the previously-mentioned exhibition at Barbican. Featuring work by over thirty artists including Meleko Mokgosi, Ed Ruscha, Jenny Saville, and Tatiana Trouvé, this group exhibition encourages an investigation into historical overlap and disjunction in such varied fields as anthropology, philosophy, film, electronic music, and visual art. In defining the subject of their exhibition, the curators of Haunted Realism quote Mark Fisher, from whom the exhibition draws significant inspiration, who notes that “What haunts the digital cul-de-sacs of the twenty-first century is not so much the past as all the lost futures that the twentieth century taught us to anticipate”.

Haunted Realism is showing at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill until 26th August

Enclosures, Jesse Darling, installation view

Jesse Darling: Enclosures at Camden Art Centre

The fourth recipient of the Camden Art Centre Freelands Lomax Fellowship is Jesse Darling, whose multimedia art spans installation, sound, text, film and performance. This new commission serves as the result of two years of research into the inherently varied nature of humanity, society and technologies, and their potential - and shortcomings - in adapting to accommodate vulnerability. Their work also investigates the limitations of binary thinking in regard to the human body, facilitating a wider consideration of the human condition as a whole. In their use of clay throughout this exhibition, Darling considers the material to be similarly multifaceted for its use in architecture, artistic practice, and various forms of cultural and historical relevance in its relation to the human body. Throughout their 10 year career so far, Darling has considered the ephemerality of being and the inevitability of decay, and this exhibition serves as something of a treatise on the subject.

Jesse Darling: Enclosures is showing at Camden Art Centre until 26th June

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this June
We give our guide to the best exhibitions showing in London over the coming month...

Melancholy, Edvard Munch, 1894-96

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen at The Courtauld

Showing at the Courtauld’s Denise Coates Exhibition Galleries, Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen marks the first ever UK exhibition of the KODE art museum’s collection of Munch paintings. Originally curated by Norwegian industrialist Rasmus Meyer in the early twentieth century, this exhibition serves not only as the first display of these 18 works in the UK, but anywhere outside of Norway. With its permanent collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings which inspired Munch, The Courtauld provides the perfect space to give historical and artistic context to the artist’s work in display; beginning with his ‘realist’ work from the 1880s - such as Morning (1884) and Summer Night (1889) - and moving on to the expressive, visceral portraits of the human psyche later on in his career such as Evening on Karl Johan (1892), Melancholy (1894-96) and At the Death Bed (1895), this exhibition provides a rare display of one of the most important collections of Munch’s work.

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen is showing at The Courtauld until 4th September

Our Time on Earth installation view

Our Time on Earth at Barbican

Guest curators Caroline Till and Kate Franklin have transformed The Curve at Barbican in an organic, thought-provoking series of rooms, each one providing a window into an imagined future. Each room considers the future through a different lens, though most take the profound and impending effects humans have made on our ecosystem into account. Other themes investigated include the fluidity of identity, the rewilding of urban spaces and the relationship between humans and other species who inhabit the planet. Many of the pieces encourage active interaction with dynamic displays; a short digital game sees visitors control various natural organisms across millennia, while another tracks the bodies of passers-by and recreates their movements with organic matter, barely recognisable as human. Utilising modern technology to issue a stark warning about the near future, Our Time on Earth is a sobering but hopeful exhibition encouraging active change in the face of the climate crisis.

Our Time on Earth is showing at Barbican until 29th August

The Birth of Melpomene, Jim Shaw, 2022

Haunted Realism at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill

This exhibition at Gagosian’s Grosvenor Hill location takes its name from Jacques Derrida’s concept of ‘hauntology’, as coined in his 1993 book Specters of Marx as an investigation of Marxism’s frequent “haunt[ing of] Western society from beyond the grave”. The concept is investigated here by the bringing together of various depictions of modernity throughout the ages, prompting viewers to consider what these pieces can tell us about those ages’ aspirations, or ‘lost futures’, perhaps complimenting the previously-mentioned exhibition at Barbican. Featuring work by over thirty artists including Meleko Mokgosi, Ed Ruscha, Jenny Saville, and Tatiana Trouvé, this group exhibition encourages an investigation into historical overlap and disjunction in such varied fields as anthropology, philosophy, film, electronic music, and visual art. In defining the subject of their exhibition, the curators of Haunted Realism quote Mark Fisher, from whom the exhibition draws significant inspiration, who notes that “What haunts the digital cul-de-sacs of the twenty-first century is not so much the past as all the lost futures that the twentieth century taught us to anticipate”.

Haunted Realism is showing at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill until 26th August

Enclosures, Jesse Darling, installation view

Jesse Darling: Enclosures at Camden Art Centre

The fourth recipient of the Camden Art Centre Freelands Lomax Fellowship is Jesse Darling, whose multimedia art spans installation, sound, text, film and performance. This new commission serves as the result of two years of research into the inherently varied nature of humanity, society and technologies, and their potential - and shortcomings - in adapting to accommodate vulnerability. Their work also investigates the limitations of binary thinking in regard to the human body, facilitating a wider consideration of the human condition as a whole. In their use of clay throughout this exhibition, Darling considers the material to be similarly multifaceted for its use in architecture, artistic practice, and various forms of cultural and historical relevance in its relation to the human body. Throughout their 10 year career so far, Darling has considered the ephemerality of being and the inevitability of decay, and this exhibition serves as something of a treatise on the subject.

Jesse Darling: Enclosures is showing at Camden Art Centre until 26th June

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07/06/2022
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Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this June
We give our guide to the best exhibitions showing in London over the coming month...

Melancholy, Edvard Munch, 1894-96

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen at The Courtauld

Showing at the Courtauld’s Denise Coates Exhibition Galleries, Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen marks the first ever UK exhibition of the KODE art museum’s collection of Munch paintings. Originally curated by Norwegian industrialist Rasmus Meyer in the early twentieth century, this exhibition serves not only as the first display of these 18 works in the UK, but anywhere outside of Norway. With its permanent collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings which inspired Munch, The Courtauld provides the perfect space to give historical and artistic context to the artist’s work in display; beginning with his ‘realist’ work from the 1880s - such as Morning (1884) and Summer Night (1889) - and moving on to the expressive, visceral portraits of the human psyche later on in his career such as Evening on Karl Johan (1892), Melancholy (1894-96) and At the Death Bed (1895), this exhibition provides a rare display of one of the most important collections of Munch’s work.

Edvard Munch: Masterpieces from Bergen is showing at The Courtauld until 4th September

Our Time on Earth installation view

Our Time on Earth at Barbican

Guest curators Caroline Till and Kate Franklin have transformed The Curve at Barbican in an organic, thought-provoking series of rooms, each one providing a window into an imagined future. Each room considers the future through a different lens, though most take the profound and impending effects humans have made on our ecosystem into account. Other themes investigated include the fluidity of identity, the rewilding of urban spaces and the relationship between humans and other species who inhabit the planet. Many of the pieces encourage active interaction with dynamic displays; a short digital game sees visitors control various natural organisms across millennia, while another tracks the bodies of passers-by and recreates their movements with organic matter, barely recognisable as human. Utilising modern technology to issue a stark warning about the near future, Our Time on Earth is a sobering but hopeful exhibition encouraging active change in the face of the climate crisis.

Our Time on Earth is showing at Barbican until 29th August

The Birth of Melpomene, Jim Shaw, 2022

Haunted Realism at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill

This exhibition at Gagosian’s Grosvenor Hill location takes its name from Jacques Derrida’s concept of ‘hauntology’, as coined in his 1993 book Specters of Marx as an investigation of Marxism’s frequent “haunt[ing of] Western society from beyond the grave”. The concept is investigated here by the bringing together of various depictions of modernity throughout the ages, prompting viewers to consider what these pieces can tell us about those ages’ aspirations, or ‘lost futures’, perhaps complimenting the previously-mentioned exhibition at Barbican. Featuring work by over thirty artists including Meleko Mokgosi, Ed Ruscha, Jenny Saville, and Tatiana Trouvé, this group exhibition encourages an investigation into historical overlap and disjunction in such varied fields as anthropology, philosophy, film, electronic music, and visual art. In defining the subject of their exhibition, the curators of Haunted Realism quote Mark Fisher, from whom the exhibition draws significant inspiration, who notes that “What haunts the digital cul-de-sacs of the twenty-first century is not so much the past as all the lost futures that the twentieth century taught us to anticipate”.

Haunted Realism is showing at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill until 26th August

Enclosures, Jesse Darling, installation view

Jesse Darling: Enclosures at Camden Art Centre

The fourth recipient of the Camden Art Centre Freelands Lomax Fellowship is Jesse Darling, whose multimedia art spans installation, sound, text, film and performance. This new commission serves as the result of two years of research into the inherently varied nature of humanity, society and technologies, and their potential - and shortcomings - in adapting to accommodate vulnerability. Their work also investigates the limitations of binary thinking in regard to the human body, facilitating a wider consideration of the human condition as a whole. In their use of clay throughout this exhibition, Darling considers the material to be similarly multifaceted for its use in architecture, artistic practice, and various forms of cultural and historical relevance in its relation to the human body. Throughout their 10 year career so far, Darling has considered the ephemerality of being and the inevitability of decay, and this exhibition serves as something of a treatise on the subject.

Jesse Darling: Enclosures is showing at Camden Art Centre until 26th June

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
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