21/07/2020
Artist Interview
Lucy Strange
Artist Interview: Rene Matić

Could you start by telling me a little about yourself and your background?

My name is Rene Matić, my pronouns are they/them and I just turned 23. I am originally from Peterborough but I live and work in London.

Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019
Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019

What first got you interested in the BA Fine Art course at Central Saint Martins?

I always wanted to go to CSM because I used to want to study fashion. When I knew that art was the path I wanted to take, I still felt a gravitation towards the energy/history so I chose to study there.

How is the course structured?

It is hard to say... you basically do whatever you want and then get marked on that. Briefs are given every term to push for structure and direction where it is lacking. It is three years of playing and trying to understand that playing. The difficulty isn't the work load, it's finding the discipline, navigating the politics of the institution AND growing up.

(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020
(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020

Could you tell me about your work and how it has progressed throughout the programme?

My work explores the immeasurable dimensions of Blackness through the lens of my own personal experiences as a queer, Black womxn living in the diaspora. In doing so, I aim to expose, combat and question the power relations that pervade the art world and society more widely.

My current work predominantly explores the Skinhead movement, its founding as a multicultural marriage between West Indian and white working class culture and its subsequent co-option by far right white supremacists. They use this as a metaphor to examine their own experience of living in the Black British diaspora and also to excavate white jealousy, the continued legacy of colonialism and the fear of a Black planet - all things which find convergence within and upon my mixed race identity.

I think the ~ programme ~  has given me time to become more familiar with a process. I get cross, I get lost, I read, I find, I breathe all that into something and then the cycle begins again. Cornelia Parker speaks about the metaphor of breathing within her work - to steal the breath from an object and to breath it back in again. In my case, I feel like I am the object. The world steals my breath and I have to steal it back, my work is a reflection of that. That is the difference between Black art and white art.

Crucified Skinhead, 2018
Crucified Skinhead, 2018

Tell us about the graduate show you are planning and the challenges you face under the current circumstances.

I was fortunate enough to have my graduate piece shown in an online solo show with Arcadia Missa. I produced a film called 'we give a lead to Britain' where I am captured retracing the “No Colour Bar” Dance, which occurred at Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton, in which Caribbean and British couples danced in 1955. I worked with an old friend and amazing musician, Harrison Bernard on the sound design.

If I am honest, I wasn't looking forward to the degree show anyway. I don't like to compromise when showing work and this piece felt too precious to cram into a space with other works that probably wouldn't hold it safely. Although I made a compromise by showing it online, it meant it could breath by itself. 'we give a lead to Britain' will be on show in another solo show early next year so I am exited to play with it in a physical space.

Fossilised Fred, 2019
Fossilised Fred, 2019

When and how will we be able to see the show?  

There is an online graduate show case where you can see a collection of works by final year students.

Do you have plans for the future once you finish the BA course?

I am currently working towards three solo shows and three group shows, one of which is New Contemporaries. It's a busy time, I couldn't be happier.

What is the best way for us to follow your work?

I announce everything on my instagram (@bad.gal.rene) where I also post research and other bits. I also have a 35mm account (@rude.gal.rene) where I post some photography bits.

Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
21/07/2020
Artist Interview
Lucy Strange
Artist Interview: Rene Matić

Could you start by telling me a little about yourself and your background?

My name is Rene Matić, my pronouns are they/them and I just turned 23. I am originally from Peterborough but I live and work in London.

Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019
Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019

What first got you interested in the BA Fine Art course at Central Saint Martins?

I always wanted to go to CSM because I used to want to study fashion. When I knew that art was the path I wanted to take, I still felt a gravitation towards the energy/history so I chose to study there.

How is the course structured?

It is hard to say... you basically do whatever you want and then get marked on that. Briefs are given every term to push for structure and direction where it is lacking. It is three years of playing and trying to understand that playing. The difficulty isn't the work load, it's finding the discipline, navigating the politics of the institution AND growing up.

(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020
(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020

Could you tell me about your work and how it has progressed throughout the programme?

My work explores the immeasurable dimensions of Blackness through the lens of my own personal experiences as a queer, Black womxn living in the diaspora. In doing so, I aim to expose, combat and question the power relations that pervade the art world and society more widely.

My current work predominantly explores the Skinhead movement, its founding as a multicultural marriage between West Indian and white working class culture and its subsequent co-option by far right white supremacists. They use this as a metaphor to examine their own experience of living in the Black British diaspora and also to excavate white jealousy, the continued legacy of colonialism and the fear of a Black planet - all things which find convergence within and upon my mixed race identity.

I think the ~ programme ~  has given me time to become more familiar with a process. I get cross, I get lost, I read, I find, I breathe all that into something and then the cycle begins again. Cornelia Parker speaks about the metaphor of breathing within her work - to steal the breath from an object and to breath it back in again. In my case, I feel like I am the object. The world steals my breath and I have to steal it back, my work is a reflection of that. That is the difference between Black art and white art.

Crucified Skinhead, 2018
Crucified Skinhead, 2018

Tell us about the graduate show you are planning and the challenges you face under the current circumstances.

I was fortunate enough to have my graduate piece shown in an online solo show with Arcadia Missa. I produced a film called 'we give a lead to Britain' where I am captured retracing the “No Colour Bar” Dance, which occurred at Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton, in which Caribbean and British couples danced in 1955. I worked with an old friend and amazing musician, Harrison Bernard on the sound design.

If I am honest, I wasn't looking forward to the degree show anyway. I don't like to compromise when showing work and this piece felt too precious to cram into a space with other works that probably wouldn't hold it safely. Although I made a compromise by showing it online, it meant it could breath by itself. 'we give a lead to Britain' will be on show in another solo show early next year so I am exited to play with it in a physical space.

Fossilised Fred, 2019
Fossilised Fred, 2019

When and how will we be able to see the show?  

There is an online graduate show case where you can see a collection of works by final year students.

Do you have plans for the future once you finish the BA course?

I am currently working towards three solo shows and three group shows, one of which is New Contemporaries. It's a busy time, I couldn't be happier.

What is the best way for us to follow your work?

I announce everything on my instagram (@bad.gal.rene) where I also post research and other bits. I also have a 35mm account (@rude.gal.rene) where I post some photography bits.

Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
21/07/2020
Artist Interview
Lucy Strange
Artist Interview: Rene Matić

Could you start by telling me a little about yourself and your background?

My name is Rene Matić, my pronouns are they/them and I just turned 23. I am originally from Peterborough but I live and work in London.

Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019
Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019

What first got you interested in the BA Fine Art course at Central Saint Martins?

I always wanted to go to CSM because I used to want to study fashion. When I knew that art was the path I wanted to take, I still felt a gravitation towards the energy/history so I chose to study there.

How is the course structured?

It is hard to say... you basically do whatever you want and then get marked on that. Briefs are given every term to push for structure and direction where it is lacking. It is three years of playing and trying to understand that playing. The difficulty isn't the work load, it's finding the discipline, navigating the politics of the institution AND growing up.

(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020
(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020

Could you tell me about your work and how it has progressed throughout the programme?

My work explores the immeasurable dimensions of Blackness through the lens of my own personal experiences as a queer, Black womxn living in the diaspora. In doing so, I aim to expose, combat and question the power relations that pervade the art world and society more widely.

My current work predominantly explores the Skinhead movement, its founding as a multicultural marriage between West Indian and white working class culture and its subsequent co-option by far right white supremacists. They use this as a metaphor to examine their own experience of living in the Black British diaspora and also to excavate white jealousy, the continued legacy of colonialism and the fear of a Black planet - all things which find convergence within and upon my mixed race identity.

I think the ~ programme ~  has given me time to become more familiar with a process. I get cross, I get lost, I read, I find, I breathe all that into something and then the cycle begins again. Cornelia Parker speaks about the metaphor of breathing within her work - to steal the breath from an object and to breath it back in again. In my case, I feel like I am the object. The world steals my breath and I have to steal it back, my work is a reflection of that. That is the difference between Black art and white art.

Crucified Skinhead, 2018
Crucified Skinhead, 2018

Tell us about the graduate show you are planning and the challenges you face under the current circumstances.

I was fortunate enough to have my graduate piece shown in an online solo show with Arcadia Missa. I produced a film called 'we give a lead to Britain' where I am captured retracing the “No Colour Bar” Dance, which occurred at Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton, in which Caribbean and British couples danced in 1955. I worked with an old friend and amazing musician, Harrison Bernard on the sound design.

If I am honest, I wasn't looking forward to the degree show anyway. I don't like to compromise when showing work and this piece felt too precious to cram into a space with other works that probably wouldn't hold it safely. Although I made a compromise by showing it online, it meant it could breath by itself. 'we give a lead to Britain' will be on show in another solo show early next year so I am exited to play with it in a physical space.

Fossilised Fred, 2019
Fossilised Fred, 2019

When and how will we be able to see the show?  

There is an online graduate show case where you can see a collection of works by final year students.

Do you have plans for the future once you finish the BA course?

I am currently working towards three solo shows and three group shows, one of which is New Contemporaries. It's a busy time, I couldn't be happier.

What is the best way for us to follow your work?

I announce everything on my instagram (@bad.gal.rene) where I also post research and other bits. I also have a 35mm account (@rude.gal.rene) where I post some photography bits.

Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
21/07/2020
Artist Interview
Lucy Strange
Artist Interview: Rene Matić

Could you start by telling me a little about yourself and your background?

My name is Rene Matić, my pronouns are they/them and I just turned 23. I am originally from Peterborough but I live and work in London.

Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019
Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019

What first got you interested in the BA Fine Art course at Central Saint Martins?

I always wanted to go to CSM because I used to want to study fashion. When I knew that art was the path I wanted to take, I still felt a gravitation towards the energy/history so I chose to study there.

How is the course structured?

It is hard to say... you basically do whatever you want and then get marked on that. Briefs are given every term to push for structure and direction where it is lacking. It is three years of playing and trying to understand that playing. The difficulty isn't the work load, it's finding the discipline, navigating the politics of the institution AND growing up.

(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020
(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020

Could you tell me about your work and how it has progressed throughout the programme?

My work explores the immeasurable dimensions of Blackness through the lens of my own personal experiences as a queer, Black womxn living in the diaspora. In doing so, I aim to expose, combat and question the power relations that pervade the art world and society more widely.

My current work predominantly explores the Skinhead movement, its founding as a multicultural marriage between West Indian and white working class culture and its subsequent co-option by far right white supremacists. They use this as a metaphor to examine their own experience of living in the Black British diaspora and also to excavate white jealousy, the continued legacy of colonialism and the fear of a Black planet - all things which find convergence within and upon my mixed race identity.

I think the ~ programme ~  has given me time to become more familiar with a process. I get cross, I get lost, I read, I find, I breathe all that into something and then the cycle begins again. Cornelia Parker speaks about the metaphor of breathing within her work - to steal the breath from an object and to breath it back in again. In my case, I feel like I am the object. The world steals my breath and I have to steal it back, my work is a reflection of that. That is the difference between Black art and white art.

Crucified Skinhead, 2018
Crucified Skinhead, 2018

Tell us about the graduate show you are planning and the challenges you face under the current circumstances.

I was fortunate enough to have my graduate piece shown in an online solo show with Arcadia Missa. I produced a film called 'we give a lead to Britain' where I am captured retracing the “No Colour Bar” Dance, which occurred at Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton, in which Caribbean and British couples danced in 1955. I worked with an old friend and amazing musician, Harrison Bernard on the sound design.

If I am honest, I wasn't looking forward to the degree show anyway. I don't like to compromise when showing work and this piece felt too precious to cram into a space with other works that probably wouldn't hold it safely. Although I made a compromise by showing it online, it meant it could breath by itself. 'we give a lead to Britain' will be on show in another solo show early next year so I am exited to play with it in a physical space.

Fossilised Fred, 2019
Fossilised Fred, 2019

When and how will we be able to see the show?  

There is an online graduate show case where you can see a collection of works by final year students.

Do you have plans for the future once you finish the BA course?

I am currently working towards three solo shows and three group shows, one of which is New Contemporaries. It's a busy time, I couldn't be happier.

What is the best way for us to follow your work?

I announce everything on my instagram (@bad.gal.rene) where I also post research and other bits. I also have a 35mm account (@rude.gal.rene) where I post some photography bits.

Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
21/07/2020
Artist Interview
Lucy Strange
Artist Interview: Rene Matić

Could you start by telling me a little about yourself and your background?

My name is Rene Matić, my pronouns are they/them and I just turned 23. I am originally from Peterborough but I live and work in London.

Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019
Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019

What first got you interested in the BA Fine Art course at Central Saint Martins?

I always wanted to go to CSM because I used to want to study fashion. When I knew that art was the path I wanted to take, I still felt a gravitation towards the energy/history so I chose to study there.

How is the course structured?

It is hard to say... you basically do whatever you want and then get marked on that. Briefs are given every term to push for structure and direction where it is lacking. It is three years of playing and trying to understand that playing. The difficulty isn't the work load, it's finding the discipline, navigating the politics of the institution AND growing up.

(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020
(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020

Could you tell me about your work and how it has progressed throughout the programme?

My work explores the immeasurable dimensions of Blackness through the lens of my own personal experiences as a queer, Black womxn living in the diaspora. In doing so, I aim to expose, combat and question the power relations that pervade the art world and society more widely.

My current work predominantly explores the Skinhead movement, its founding as a multicultural marriage between West Indian and white working class culture and its subsequent co-option by far right white supremacists. They use this as a metaphor to examine their own experience of living in the Black British diaspora and also to excavate white jealousy, the continued legacy of colonialism and the fear of a Black planet - all things which find convergence within and upon my mixed race identity.

I think the ~ programme ~  has given me time to become more familiar with a process. I get cross, I get lost, I read, I find, I breathe all that into something and then the cycle begins again. Cornelia Parker speaks about the metaphor of breathing within her work - to steal the breath from an object and to breath it back in again. In my case, I feel like I am the object. The world steals my breath and I have to steal it back, my work is a reflection of that. That is the difference between Black art and white art.

Crucified Skinhead, 2018
Crucified Skinhead, 2018

Tell us about the graduate show you are planning and the challenges you face under the current circumstances.

I was fortunate enough to have my graduate piece shown in an online solo show with Arcadia Missa. I produced a film called 'we give a lead to Britain' where I am captured retracing the “No Colour Bar” Dance, which occurred at Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton, in which Caribbean and British couples danced in 1955. I worked with an old friend and amazing musician, Harrison Bernard on the sound design.

If I am honest, I wasn't looking forward to the degree show anyway. I don't like to compromise when showing work and this piece felt too precious to cram into a space with other works that probably wouldn't hold it safely. Although I made a compromise by showing it online, it meant it could breath by itself. 'we give a lead to Britain' will be on show in another solo show early next year so I am exited to play with it in a physical space.

Fossilised Fred, 2019
Fossilised Fred, 2019

When and how will we be able to see the show?  

There is an online graduate show case where you can see a collection of works by final year students.

Do you have plans for the future once you finish the BA course?

I am currently working towards three solo shows and three group shows, one of which is New Contemporaries. It's a busy time, I couldn't be happier.

What is the best way for us to follow your work?

I announce everything on my instagram (@bad.gal.rene) where I also post research and other bits. I also have a 35mm account (@rude.gal.rene) where I post some photography bits.

Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
21/07/2020
Artist Interview
Lucy Strange
Artist Interview: Rene Matić

Could you start by telling me a little about yourself and your background?

My name is Rene Matić, my pronouns are they/them and I just turned 23. I am originally from Peterborough but I live and work in London.

Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019
Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019

What first got you interested in the BA Fine Art course at Central Saint Martins?

I always wanted to go to CSM because I used to want to study fashion. When I knew that art was the path I wanted to take, I still felt a gravitation towards the energy/history so I chose to study there.

How is the course structured?

It is hard to say... you basically do whatever you want and then get marked on that. Briefs are given every term to push for structure and direction where it is lacking. It is three years of playing and trying to understand that playing. The difficulty isn't the work load, it's finding the discipline, navigating the politics of the institution AND growing up.

(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020
(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020

Could you tell me about your work and how it has progressed throughout the programme?

My work explores the immeasurable dimensions of Blackness through the lens of my own personal experiences as a queer, Black womxn living in the diaspora. In doing so, I aim to expose, combat and question the power relations that pervade the art world and society more widely.

My current work predominantly explores the Skinhead movement, its founding as a multicultural marriage between West Indian and white working class culture and its subsequent co-option by far right white supremacists. They use this as a metaphor to examine their own experience of living in the Black British diaspora and also to excavate white jealousy, the continued legacy of colonialism and the fear of a Black planet - all things which find convergence within and upon my mixed race identity.

I think the ~ programme ~  has given me time to become more familiar with a process. I get cross, I get lost, I read, I find, I breathe all that into something and then the cycle begins again. Cornelia Parker speaks about the metaphor of breathing within her work - to steal the breath from an object and to breath it back in again. In my case, I feel like I am the object. The world steals my breath and I have to steal it back, my work is a reflection of that. That is the difference between Black art and white art.

Crucified Skinhead, 2018
Crucified Skinhead, 2018

Tell us about the graduate show you are planning and the challenges you face under the current circumstances.

I was fortunate enough to have my graduate piece shown in an online solo show with Arcadia Missa. I produced a film called 'we give a lead to Britain' where I am captured retracing the “No Colour Bar” Dance, which occurred at Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton, in which Caribbean and British couples danced in 1955. I worked with an old friend and amazing musician, Harrison Bernard on the sound design.

If I am honest, I wasn't looking forward to the degree show anyway. I don't like to compromise when showing work and this piece felt too precious to cram into a space with other works that probably wouldn't hold it safely. Although I made a compromise by showing it online, it meant it could breath by itself. 'we give a lead to Britain' will be on show in another solo show early next year so I am exited to play with it in a physical space.

Fossilised Fred, 2019
Fossilised Fred, 2019

When and how will we be able to see the show?  

There is an online graduate show case where you can see a collection of works by final year students.

Do you have plans for the future once you finish the BA course?

I am currently working towards three solo shows and three group shows, one of which is New Contemporaries. It's a busy time, I couldn't be happier.

What is the best way for us to follow your work?

I announce everything on my instagram (@bad.gal.rene) where I also post research and other bits. I also have a 35mm account (@rude.gal.rene) where I post some photography bits.

Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
21/07/2020
Artist Interview
Lucy Strange
Artist Interview: Rene Matić

Could you start by telling me a little about yourself and your background?

My name is Rene Matić, my pronouns are they/them and I just turned 23. I am originally from Peterborough but I live and work in London.

Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019
Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019

What first got you interested in the BA Fine Art course at Central Saint Martins?

I always wanted to go to CSM because I used to want to study fashion. When I knew that art was the path I wanted to take, I still felt a gravitation towards the energy/history so I chose to study there.

How is the course structured?

It is hard to say... you basically do whatever you want and then get marked on that. Briefs are given every term to push for structure and direction where it is lacking. It is three years of playing and trying to understand that playing. The difficulty isn't the work load, it's finding the discipline, navigating the politics of the institution AND growing up.

(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020
(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020

Could you tell me about your work and how it has progressed throughout the programme?

My work explores the immeasurable dimensions of Blackness through the lens of my own personal experiences as a queer, Black womxn living in the diaspora. In doing so, I aim to expose, combat and question the power relations that pervade the art world and society more widely.

My current work predominantly explores the Skinhead movement, its founding as a multicultural marriage between West Indian and white working class culture and its subsequent co-option by far right white supremacists. They use this as a metaphor to examine their own experience of living in the Black British diaspora and also to excavate white jealousy, the continued legacy of colonialism and the fear of a Black planet - all things which find convergence within and upon my mixed race identity.

I think the ~ programme ~  has given me time to become more familiar with a process. I get cross, I get lost, I read, I find, I breathe all that into something and then the cycle begins again. Cornelia Parker speaks about the metaphor of breathing within her work - to steal the breath from an object and to breath it back in again. In my case, I feel like I am the object. The world steals my breath and I have to steal it back, my work is a reflection of that. That is the difference between Black art and white art.

Crucified Skinhead, 2018
Crucified Skinhead, 2018

Tell us about the graduate show you are planning and the challenges you face under the current circumstances.

I was fortunate enough to have my graduate piece shown in an online solo show with Arcadia Missa. I produced a film called 'we give a lead to Britain' where I am captured retracing the “No Colour Bar” Dance, which occurred at Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton, in which Caribbean and British couples danced in 1955. I worked with an old friend and amazing musician, Harrison Bernard on the sound design.

If I am honest, I wasn't looking forward to the degree show anyway. I don't like to compromise when showing work and this piece felt too precious to cram into a space with other works that probably wouldn't hold it safely. Although I made a compromise by showing it online, it meant it could breath by itself. 'we give a lead to Britain' will be on show in another solo show early next year so I am exited to play with it in a physical space.

Fossilised Fred, 2019
Fossilised Fred, 2019

When and how will we be able to see the show?  

There is an online graduate show case where you can see a collection of works by final year students.

Do you have plans for the future once you finish the BA course?

I am currently working towards three solo shows and three group shows, one of which is New Contemporaries. It's a busy time, I couldn't be happier.

What is the best way for us to follow your work?

I announce everything on my instagram (@bad.gal.rene) where I also post research and other bits. I also have a 35mm account (@rude.gal.rene) where I post some photography bits.

Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
21/07/2020
Artist Interview
Lucy Strange
Artist Interview: Rene Matić

Could you start by telling me a little about yourself and your background?

My name is Rene Matić, my pronouns are they/them and I just turned 23. I am originally from Peterborough but I live and work in London.

Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019
Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019

What first got you interested in the BA Fine Art course at Central Saint Martins?

I always wanted to go to CSM because I used to want to study fashion. When I knew that art was the path I wanted to take, I still felt a gravitation towards the energy/history so I chose to study there.

How is the course structured?

It is hard to say... you basically do whatever you want and then get marked on that. Briefs are given every term to push for structure and direction where it is lacking. It is three years of playing and trying to understand that playing. The difficulty isn't the work load, it's finding the discipline, navigating the politics of the institution AND growing up.

(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020
(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020

Could you tell me about your work and how it has progressed throughout the programme?

My work explores the immeasurable dimensions of Blackness through the lens of my own personal experiences as a queer, Black womxn living in the diaspora. In doing so, I aim to expose, combat and question the power relations that pervade the art world and society more widely.

My current work predominantly explores the Skinhead movement, its founding as a multicultural marriage between West Indian and white working class culture and its subsequent co-option by far right white supremacists. They use this as a metaphor to examine their own experience of living in the Black British diaspora and also to excavate white jealousy, the continued legacy of colonialism and the fear of a Black planet - all things which find convergence within and upon my mixed race identity.

I think the ~ programme ~  has given me time to become more familiar with a process. I get cross, I get lost, I read, I find, I breathe all that into something and then the cycle begins again. Cornelia Parker speaks about the metaphor of breathing within her work - to steal the breath from an object and to breath it back in again. In my case, I feel like I am the object. The world steals my breath and I have to steal it back, my work is a reflection of that. That is the difference between Black art and white art.

Crucified Skinhead, 2018
Crucified Skinhead, 2018

Tell us about the graduate show you are planning and the challenges you face under the current circumstances.

I was fortunate enough to have my graduate piece shown in an online solo show with Arcadia Missa. I produced a film called 'we give a lead to Britain' where I am captured retracing the “No Colour Bar” Dance, which occurred at Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton, in which Caribbean and British couples danced in 1955. I worked with an old friend and amazing musician, Harrison Bernard on the sound design.

If I am honest, I wasn't looking forward to the degree show anyway. I don't like to compromise when showing work and this piece felt too precious to cram into a space with other works that probably wouldn't hold it safely. Although I made a compromise by showing it online, it meant it could breath by itself. 'we give a lead to Britain' will be on show in another solo show early next year so I am exited to play with it in a physical space.

Fossilised Fred, 2019
Fossilised Fred, 2019

When and how will we be able to see the show?  

There is an online graduate show case where you can see a collection of works by final year students.

Do you have plans for the future once you finish the BA course?

I am currently working towards three solo shows and three group shows, one of which is New Contemporaries. It's a busy time, I couldn't be happier.

What is the best way for us to follow your work?

I announce everything on my instagram (@bad.gal.rene) where I also post research and other bits. I also have a 35mm account (@rude.gal.rene) where I post some photography bits.

Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
21/07/2020
Artist Interview
Lucy Strange
Artist Interview: Rene Matić

Could you start by telling me a little about yourself and your background?

My name is Rene Matić, my pronouns are they/them and I just turned 23. I am originally from Peterborough but I live and work in London.

Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019
Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019

What first got you interested in the BA Fine Art course at Central Saint Martins?

I always wanted to go to CSM because I used to want to study fashion. When I knew that art was the path I wanted to take, I still felt a gravitation towards the energy/history so I chose to study there.

How is the course structured?

It is hard to say... you basically do whatever you want and then get marked on that. Briefs are given every term to push for structure and direction where it is lacking. It is three years of playing and trying to understand that playing. The difficulty isn't the work load, it's finding the discipline, navigating the politics of the institution AND growing up.

(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020
(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020

Could you tell me about your work and how it has progressed throughout the programme?

My work explores the immeasurable dimensions of Blackness through the lens of my own personal experiences as a queer, Black womxn living in the diaspora. In doing so, I aim to expose, combat and question the power relations that pervade the art world and society more widely.

My current work predominantly explores the Skinhead movement, its founding as a multicultural marriage between West Indian and white working class culture and its subsequent co-option by far right white supremacists. They use this as a metaphor to examine their own experience of living in the Black British diaspora and also to excavate white jealousy, the continued legacy of colonialism and the fear of a Black planet - all things which find convergence within and upon my mixed race identity.

I think the ~ programme ~  has given me time to become more familiar with a process. I get cross, I get lost, I read, I find, I breathe all that into something and then the cycle begins again. Cornelia Parker speaks about the metaphor of breathing within her work - to steal the breath from an object and to breath it back in again. In my case, I feel like I am the object. The world steals my breath and I have to steal it back, my work is a reflection of that. That is the difference between Black art and white art.

Crucified Skinhead, 2018
Crucified Skinhead, 2018

Tell us about the graduate show you are planning and the challenges you face under the current circumstances.

I was fortunate enough to have my graduate piece shown in an online solo show with Arcadia Missa. I produced a film called 'we give a lead to Britain' where I am captured retracing the “No Colour Bar” Dance, which occurred at Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton, in which Caribbean and British couples danced in 1955. I worked with an old friend and amazing musician, Harrison Bernard on the sound design.

If I am honest, I wasn't looking forward to the degree show anyway. I don't like to compromise when showing work and this piece felt too precious to cram into a space with other works that probably wouldn't hold it safely. Although I made a compromise by showing it online, it meant it could breath by itself. 'we give a lead to Britain' will be on show in another solo show early next year so I am exited to play with it in a physical space.

Fossilised Fred, 2019
Fossilised Fred, 2019

When and how will we be able to see the show?  

There is an online graduate show case where you can see a collection of works by final year students.

Do you have plans for the future once you finish the BA course?

I am currently working towards three solo shows and three group shows, one of which is New Contemporaries. It's a busy time, I couldn't be happier.

What is the best way for us to follow your work?

I announce everything on my instagram (@bad.gal.rene) where I also post research and other bits. I also have a 35mm account (@rude.gal.rene) where I post some photography bits.

Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
21/07/2020
Artist Interview
Lucy Strange
Artist Interview: Rene Matić

Could you start by telling me a little about yourself and your background?

My name is Rene Matić, my pronouns are they/them and I just turned 23. I am originally from Peterborough but I live and work in London.

Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019
Brown Girl in The Art World III, 2019

What first got you interested in the BA Fine Art course at Central Saint Martins?

I always wanted to go to CSM because I used to want to study fashion. When I knew that art was the path I wanted to take, I still felt a gravitation towards the energy/history so I chose to study there.

How is the course structured?

It is hard to say... you basically do whatever you want and then get marked on that. Briefs are given every term to push for structure and direction where it is lacking. It is three years of playing and trying to understand that playing. The difficulty isn't the work load, it's finding the discipline, navigating the politics of the institution AND growing up.

(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020
(Please) Hold On to Your Brown Babies, 2020

Could you tell me about your work and how it has progressed throughout the programme?

My work explores the immeasurable dimensions of Blackness through the lens of my own personal experiences as a queer, Black womxn living in the diaspora. In doing so, I aim to expose, combat and question the power relations that pervade the art world and society more widely.

My current work predominantly explores the Skinhead movement, its founding as a multicultural marriage between West Indian and white working class culture and its subsequent co-option by far right white supremacists. They use this as a metaphor to examine their own experience of living in the Black British diaspora and also to excavate white jealousy, the continued legacy of colonialism and the fear of a Black planet - all things which find convergence within and upon my mixed race identity.

I think the ~ programme ~  has given me time to become more familiar with a process. I get cross, I get lost, I read, I find, I breathe all that into something and then the cycle begins again. Cornelia Parker speaks about the metaphor of breathing within her work - to steal the breath from an object and to breath it back in again. In my case, I feel like I am the object. The world steals my breath and I have to steal it back, my work is a reflection of that. That is the difference between Black art and white art.

Crucified Skinhead, 2018
Crucified Skinhead, 2018

Tell us about the graduate show you are planning and the challenges you face under the current circumstances.

I was fortunate enough to have my graduate piece shown in an online solo show with Arcadia Missa. I produced a film called 'we give a lead to Britain' where I am captured retracing the “No Colour Bar” Dance, which occurred at Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton, in which Caribbean and British couples danced in 1955. I worked with an old friend and amazing musician, Harrison Bernard on the sound design.

If I am honest, I wasn't looking forward to the degree show anyway. I don't like to compromise when showing work and this piece felt too precious to cram into a space with other works that probably wouldn't hold it safely. Although I made a compromise by showing it online, it meant it could breath by itself. 'we give a lead to Britain' will be on show in another solo show early next year so I am exited to play with it in a physical space.

Fossilised Fred, 2019
Fossilised Fred, 2019

When and how will we be able to see the show?  

There is an online graduate show case where you can see a collection of works by final year students.

Do you have plans for the future once you finish the BA course?

I am currently working towards three solo shows and three group shows, one of which is New Contemporaries. It's a busy time, I couldn't be happier.

What is the best way for us to follow your work?

I announce everything on my instagram (@bad.gal.rene) where I also post research and other bits. I also have a 35mm account (@rude.gal.rene) where I post some photography bits.

Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Self Portrait at Grannys, 2019
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
Thanks For Reading
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.