01/07/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We bring you the art world's biggest stories from June 2022...

Francis Bacon in his 7 Reece Mews Studio (c.1970s), © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Tate returns 1,000-piece Francis Bacon archive over questions of authenticity

An archive of over 1,000 documents and sketches purported to be from the studio of Francis Bacon, once valued at £20m, is to be returned to its doner after questions have been raised regarding its authenticity. A statement from Tate states that research by art historians “has raised credible doubts about the nature and quality of the material”, and that in any case, “any potential it held to improve the public’s understanding of Bacon’s art has been exhausted”. Barry Joule - donor of the archive and close friend of the artist - has maintained the collection’s authenticity since questions were first raised, telling The Observer in April that he has ‘turn[ed] his back on the Tate forever’, and plans to offer hundreds of additional items from Bacon’s studio to the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Such deaccessioning is rare from the Tate, and is even prohibited in most cases by a Parliamentary act, though this does not apply to archival material such as the Joule collection. The archive itself, as reported by the Tate, “has been offered back to the donor, in line with the donor’s wishes”.

Lost #6, Ryota Kuwakabo (2012). Photo: Osamu Nakamura

Students trample artwork at Japanese art fair

The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale, held in Japan’s Niigata Prefecture, was shocked at the destruction of two pieces of art at the hands of rampaging students. The junior high students reportedly irreparably trampled Japanese artist Ryota Kuwakubo’s installation Lost #6, depicting a miniature train and light display, and damaged the multimedia piece Wellenwanne LFO by German artist Carsten Nicolai. The Triennale’ eighth edition opened on 29th April, having been delayed from 2021, and features 230 works from artists around the world. Following the incident, and the report from Japanese national newspaper The Mainichi confirming the Lost #6 to be damaged beyond repair, Kuwakubo released a statement on Twitter, in which he wrote that, while “the result alone may have crossed the line, [...] no one was hurt. Indeed, the work was destroyed, but a thing is a thing”. He went on to reaffirm that “from a physical point of view, the situation is not so serious”, and took the opportunity to sympathise with the students, and implore that communities provide spaces “to let them express their inner frustrations, anger, and desires in different ways”.

Thomas J. Price, pictured with his sculpture Warm Shores (2022) outside Hackney Town Hall. Photo: Damian Griffiths.

National Monuments to Windrush erected

Honouring the thousands of West Indian migrants of the Windrush Generation who moved to the UK following the Second World War, two major public sculptures have been installed in London. To commemorate the fourth anniversary of Windrush Day, a bronze monument by Jamaican artist Basil Watson depicting new arrivals from the Caribbean standing on suitcases was unveiled in Waterloo Station, and serves as the official National Windrush Monument, with Watson describing it as tribute to the migrants’ “ambition, courage and contribution to Britain”. In the same week, a statue by Thomas J. Price was unveiled in Hackney, funded by his winning of the Hackney Windrush Art Commission in 2020. For his sculpture, titled Warm Shores, Price used a 3D-scanning device to digitally photograph Hackney residents with a personal connection to Windrush, with the clothing of the finished bronze statues by historical research. Speaking about his piece, Price emphasised the importance that the “figures are not placed on plinths, to disrupt a sense of hierarchy that surrounds many public monuments [...] They exist amongst the public and daily life and are an extension of the people who inhabit these spaces”.

New study shows visiting a museum can reduce anxiety and chronic pain

New research from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that visiting museums and art galleries can reduce the effects of anxiety, depression and chronic pain, as well as leading to an increase in empathy and cognitive function. The study by researchers Katherine Cotter and James O. Pawelski, titled ‘Art Museums As Institutions for Human Flourishing’ was published in the the Journal of Positive Psychology, and was composed from the results of over 100 research articles and reports. Their findings concluded that visiting museums reduced stress levels and anxiety, and that viewing figurative art led to a lowering in blood pressure. On a wider societal level, the research suggested that visits to art galleries encouraged positive social interaction, with visitors reporting a decrease in feelings of a social isolation, an increased ability to form new personal connections, and “higher levels of reflection on societal topics (e.g. participating in community affairs, concerns for societal issues, contributing to the well-being of others), suggesting that the experience of the visit encourages different forms of reflection and thought processes”.

Looking to spend more time in galleries in light of this news? Download the gowithYamo app now to see the latest exhibitions showing near you!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/07/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We bring you the art world's biggest stories from June 2022...

Francis Bacon in his 7 Reece Mews Studio (c.1970s), © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Tate returns 1,000-piece Francis Bacon archive over questions of authenticity

An archive of over 1,000 documents and sketches purported to be from the studio of Francis Bacon, once valued at £20m, is to be returned to its doner after questions have been raised regarding its authenticity. A statement from Tate states that research by art historians “has raised credible doubts about the nature and quality of the material”, and that in any case, “any potential it held to improve the public’s understanding of Bacon’s art has been exhausted”. Barry Joule - donor of the archive and close friend of the artist - has maintained the collection’s authenticity since questions were first raised, telling The Observer in April that he has ‘turn[ed] his back on the Tate forever’, and plans to offer hundreds of additional items from Bacon’s studio to the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Such deaccessioning is rare from the Tate, and is even prohibited in most cases by a Parliamentary act, though this does not apply to archival material such as the Joule collection. The archive itself, as reported by the Tate, “has been offered back to the donor, in line with the donor’s wishes”.

Lost #6, Ryota Kuwakabo (2012). Photo: Osamu Nakamura

Students trample artwork at Japanese art fair

The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale, held in Japan’s Niigata Prefecture, was shocked at the destruction of two pieces of art at the hands of rampaging students. The junior high students reportedly irreparably trampled Japanese artist Ryota Kuwakubo’s installation Lost #6, depicting a miniature train and light display, and damaged the multimedia piece Wellenwanne LFO by German artist Carsten Nicolai. The Triennale’ eighth edition opened on 29th April, having been delayed from 2021, and features 230 works from artists around the world. Following the incident, and the report from Japanese national newspaper The Mainichi confirming the Lost #6 to be damaged beyond repair, Kuwakubo released a statement on Twitter, in which he wrote that, while “the result alone may have crossed the line, [...] no one was hurt. Indeed, the work was destroyed, but a thing is a thing”. He went on to reaffirm that “from a physical point of view, the situation is not so serious”, and took the opportunity to sympathise with the students, and implore that communities provide spaces “to let them express their inner frustrations, anger, and desires in different ways”.

Thomas J. Price, pictured with his sculpture Warm Shores (2022) outside Hackney Town Hall. Photo: Damian Griffiths.

National Monuments to Windrush erected

Honouring the thousands of West Indian migrants of the Windrush Generation who moved to the UK following the Second World War, two major public sculptures have been installed in London. To commemorate the fourth anniversary of Windrush Day, a bronze monument by Jamaican artist Basil Watson depicting new arrivals from the Caribbean standing on suitcases was unveiled in Waterloo Station, and serves as the official National Windrush Monument, with Watson describing it as tribute to the migrants’ “ambition, courage and contribution to Britain”. In the same week, a statue by Thomas J. Price was unveiled in Hackney, funded by his winning of the Hackney Windrush Art Commission in 2020. For his sculpture, titled Warm Shores, Price used a 3D-scanning device to digitally photograph Hackney residents with a personal connection to Windrush, with the clothing of the finished bronze statues by historical research. Speaking about his piece, Price emphasised the importance that the “figures are not placed on plinths, to disrupt a sense of hierarchy that surrounds many public monuments [...] They exist amongst the public and daily life and are an extension of the people who inhabit these spaces”.

New study shows visiting a museum can reduce anxiety and chronic pain

New research from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that visiting museums and art galleries can reduce the effects of anxiety, depression and chronic pain, as well as leading to an increase in empathy and cognitive function. The study by researchers Katherine Cotter and James O. Pawelski, titled ‘Art Museums As Institutions for Human Flourishing’ was published in the the Journal of Positive Psychology, and was composed from the results of over 100 research articles and reports. Their findings concluded that visiting museums reduced stress levels and anxiety, and that viewing figurative art led to a lowering in blood pressure. On a wider societal level, the research suggested that visits to art galleries encouraged positive social interaction, with visitors reporting a decrease in feelings of a social isolation, an increased ability to form new personal connections, and “higher levels of reflection on societal topics (e.g. participating in community affairs, concerns for societal issues, contributing to the well-being of others), suggesting that the experience of the visit encourages different forms of reflection and thought processes”.

Looking to spend more time in galleries in light of this news? Download the gowithYamo app now to see the latest exhibitions showing near you!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/07/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We bring you the art world's biggest stories from June 2022...

Francis Bacon in his 7 Reece Mews Studio (c.1970s), © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Tate returns 1,000-piece Francis Bacon archive over questions of authenticity

An archive of over 1,000 documents and sketches purported to be from the studio of Francis Bacon, once valued at £20m, is to be returned to its doner after questions have been raised regarding its authenticity. A statement from Tate states that research by art historians “has raised credible doubts about the nature and quality of the material”, and that in any case, “any potential it held to improve the public’s understanding of Bacon’s art has been exhausted”. Barry Joule - donor of the archive and close friend of the artist - has maintained the collection’s authenticity since questions were first raised, telling The Observer in April that he has ‘turn[ed] his back on the Tate forever’, and plans to offer hundreds of additional items from Bacon’s studio to the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Such deaccessioning is rare from the Tate, and is even prohibited in most cases by a Parliamentary act, though this does not apply to archival material such as the Joule collection. The archive itself, as reported by the Tate, “has been offered back to the donor, in line with the donor’s wishes”.

Lost #6, Ryota Kuwakabo (2012). Photo: Osamu Nakamura

Students trample artwork at Japanese art fair

The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale, held in Japan’s Niigata Prefecture, was shocked at the destruction of two pieces of art at the hands of rampaging students. The junior high students reportedly irreparably trampled Japanese artist Ryota Kuwakubo’s installation Lost #6, depicting a miniature train and light display, and damaged the multimedia piece Wellenwanne LFO by German artist Carsten Nicolai. The Triennale’ eighth edition opened on 29th April, having been delayed from 2021, and features 230 works from artists around the world. Following the incident, and the report from Japanese national newspaper The Mainichi confirming the Lost #6 to be damaged beyond repair, Kuwakubo released a statement on Twitter, in which he wrote that, while “the result alone may have crossed the line, [...] no one was hurt. Indeed, the work was destroyed, but a thing is a thing”. He went on to reaffirm that “from a physical point of view, the situation is not so serious”, and took the opportunity to sympathise with the students, and implore that communities provide spaces “to let them express their inner frustrations, anger, and desires in different ways”.

Thomas J. Price, pictured with his sculpture Warm Shores (2022) outside Hackney Town Hall. Photo: Damian Griffiths.

National Monuments to Windrush erected

Honouring the thousands of West Indian migrants of the Windrush Generation who moved to the UK following the Second World War, two major public sculptures have been installed in London. To commemorate the fourth anniversary of Windrush Day, a bronze monument by Jamaican artist Basil Watson depicting new arrivals from the Caribbean standing on suitcases was unveiled in Waterloo Station, and serves as the official National Windrush Monument, with Watson describing it as tribute to the migrants’ “ambition, courage and contribution to Britain”. In the same week, a statue by Thomas J. Price was unveiled in Hackney, funded by his winning of the Hackney Windrush Art Commission in 2020. For his sculpture, titled Warm Shores, Price used a 3D-scanning device to digitally photograph Hackney residents with a personal connection to Windrush, with the clothing of the finished bronze statues by historical research. Speaking about his piece, Price emphasised the importance that the “figures are not placed on plinths, to disrupt a sense of hierarchy that surrounds many public monuments [...] They exist amongst the public and daily life and are an extension of the people who inhabit these spaces”.

New study shows visiting a museum can reduce anxiety and chronic pain

New research from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that visiting museums and art galleries can reduce the effects of anxiety, depression and chronic pain, as well as leading to an increase in empathy and cognitive function. The study by researchers Katherine Cotter and James O. Pawelski, titled ‘Art Museums As Institutions for Human Flourishing’ was published in the the Journal of Positive Psychology, and was composed from the results of over 100 research articles and reports. Their findings concluded that visiting museums reduced stress levels and anxiety, and that viewing figurative art led to a lowering in blood pressure. On a wider societal level, the research suggested that visits to art galleries encouraged positive social interaction, with visitors reporting a decrease in feelings of a social isolation, an increased ability to form new personal connections, and “higher levels of reflection on societal topics (e.g. participating in community affairs, concerns for societal issues, contributing to the well-being of others), suggesting that the experience of the visit encourages different forms of reflection and thought processes”.

Looking to spend more time in galleries in light of this news? Download the gowithYamo app now to see the latest exhibitions showing near you!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/07/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We bring you the art world's biggest stories from June 2022...

Francis Bacon in his 7 Reece Mews Studio (c.1970s), © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Tate returns 1,000-piece Francis Bacon archive over questions of authenticity

An archive of over 1,000 documents and sketches purported to be from the studio of Francis Bacon, once valued at £20m, is to be returned to its doner after questions have been raised regarding its authenticity. A statement from Tate states that research by art historians “has raised credible doubts about the nature and quality of the material”, and that in any case, “any potential it held to improve the public’s understanding of Bacon’s art has been exhausted”. Barry Joule - donor of the archive and close friend of the artist - has maintained the collection’s authenticity since questions were first raised, telling The Observer in April that he has ‘turn[ed] his back on the Tate forever’, and plans to offer hundreds of additional items from Bacon’s studio to the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Such deaccessioning is rare from the Tate, and is even prohibited in most cases by a Parliamentary act, though this does not apply to archival material such as the Joule collection. The archive itself, as reported by the Tate, “has been offered back to the donor, in line with the donor’s wishes”.

Lost #6, Ryota Kuwakabo (2012). Photo: Osamu Nakamura

Students trample artwork at Japanese art fair

The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale, held in Japan’s Niigata Prefecture, was shocked at the destruction of two pieces of art at the hands of rampaging students. The junior high students reportedly irreparably trampled Japanese artist Ryota Kuwakubo’s installation Lost #6, depicting a miniature train and light display, and damaged the multimedia piece Wellenwanne LFO by German artist Carsten Nicolai. The Triennale’ eighth edition opened on 29th April, having been delayed from 2021, and features 230 works from artists around the world. Following the incident, and the report from Japanese national newspaper The Mainichi confirming the Lost #6 to be damaged beyond repair, Kuwakubo released a statement on Twitter, in which he wrote that, while “the result alone may have crossed the line, [...] no one was hurt. Indeed, the work was destroyed, but a thing is a thing”. He went on to reaffirm that “from a physical point of view, the situation is not so serious”, and took the opportunity to sympathise with the students, and implore that communities provide spaces “to let them express their inner frustrations, anger, and desires in different ways”.

Thomas J. Price, pictured with his sculpture Warm Shores (2022) outside Hackney Town Hall. Photo: Damian Griffiths.

National Monuments to Windrush erected

Honouring the thousands of West Indian migrants of the Windrush Generation who moved to the UK following the Second World War, two major public sculptures have been installed in London. To commemorate the fourth anniversary of Windrush Day, a bronze monument by Jamaican artist Basil Watson depicting new arrivals from the Caribbean standing on suitcases was unveiled in Waterloo Station, and serves as the official National Windrush Monument, with Watson describing it as tribute to the migrants’ “ambition, courage and contribution to Britain”. In the same week, a statue by Thomas J. Price was unveiled in Hackney, funded by his winning of the Hackney Windrush Art Commission in 2020. For his sculpture, titled Warm Shores, Price used a 3D-scanning device to digitally photograph Hackney residents with a personal connection to Windrush, with the clothing of the finished bronze statues by historical research. Speaking about his piece, Price emphasised the importance that the “figures are not placed on plinths, to disrupt a sense of hierarchy that surrounds many public monuments [...] They exist amongst the public and daily life and are an extension of the people who inhabit these spaces”.

New study shows visiting a museum can reduce anxiety and chronic pain

New research from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that visiting museums and art galleries can reduce the effects of anxiety, depression and chronic pain, as well as leading to an increase in empathy and cognitive function. The study by researchers Katherine Cotter and James O. Pawelski, titled ‘Art Museums As Institutions for Human Flourishing’ was published in the the Journal of Positive Psychology, and was composed from the results of over 100 research articles and reports. Their findings concluded that visiting museums reduced stress levels and anxiety, and that viewing figurative art led to a lowering in blood pressure. On a wider societal level, the research suggested that visits to art galleries encouraged positive social interaction, with visitors reporting a decrease in feelings of a social isolation, an increased ability to form new personal connections, and “higher levels of reflection on societal topics (e.g. participating in community affairs, concerns for societal issues, contributing to the well-being of others), suggesting that the experience of the visit encourages different forms of reflection and thought processes”.

Looking to spend more time in galleries in light of this news? Download the gowithYamo app now to see the latest exhibitions showing near you!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/07/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We bring you the art world's biggest stories from June 2022...

Francis Bacon in his 7 Reece Mews Studio (c.1970s), © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Tate returns 1,000-piece Francis Bacon archive over questions of authenticity

An archive of over 1,000 documents and sketches purported to be from the studio of Francis Bacon, once valued at £20m, is to be returned to its doner after questions have been raised regarding its authenticity. A statement from Tate states that research by art historians “has raised credible doubts about the nature and quality of the material”, and that in any case, “any potential it held to improve the public’s understanding of Bacon’s art has been exhausted”. Barry Joule - donor of the archive and close friend of the artist - has maintained the collection’s authenticity since questions were first raised, telling The Observer in April that he has ‘turn[ed] his back on the Tate forever’, and plans to offer hundreds of additional items from Bacon’s studio to the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Such deaccessioning is rare from the Tate, and is even prohibited in most cases by a Parliamentary act, though this does not apply to archival material such as the Joule collection. The archive itself, as reported by the Tate, “has been offered back to the donor, in line with the donor’s wishes”.

Lost #6, Ryota Kuwakabo (2012). Photo: Osamu Nakamura

Students trample artwork at Japanese art fair

The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale, held in Japan’s Niigata Prefecture, was shocked at the destruction of two pieces of art at the hands of rampaging students. The junior high students reportedly irreparably trampled Japanese artist Ryota Kuwakubo’s installation Lost #6, depicting a miniature train and light display, and damaged the multimedia piece Wellenwanne LFO by German artist Carsten Nicolai. The Triennale’ eighth edition opened on 29th April, having been delayed from 2021, and features 230 works from artists around the world. Following the incident, and the report from Japanese national newspaper The Mainichi confirming the Lost #6 to be damaged beyond repair, Kuwakubo released a statement on Twitter, in which he wrote that, while “the result alone may have crossed the line, [...] no one was hurt. Indeed, the work was destroyed, but a thing is a thing”. He went on to reaffirm that “from a physical point of view, the situation is not so serious”, and took the opportunity to sympathise with the students, and implore that communities provide spaces “to let them express their inner frustrations, anger, and desires in different ways”.

Thomas J. Price, pictured with his sculpture Warm Shores (2022) outside Hackney Town Hall. Photo: Damian Griffiths.

National Monuments to Windrush erected

Honouring the thousands of West Indian migrants of the Windrush Generation who moved to the UK following the Second World War, two major public sculptures have been installed in London. To commemorate the fourth anniversary of Windrush Day, a bronze monument by Jamaican artist Basil Watson depicting new arrivals from the Caribbean standing on suitcases was unveiled in Waterloo Station, and serves as the official National Windrush Monument, with Watson describing it as tribute to the migrants’ “ambition, courage and contribution to Britain”. In the same week, a statue by Thomas J. Price was unveiled in Hackney, funded by his winning of the Hackney Windrush Art Commission in 2020. For his sculpture, titled Warm Shores, Price used a 3D-scanning device to digitally photograph Hackney residents with a personal connection to Windrush, with the clothing of the finished bronze statues by historical research. Speaking about his piece, Price emphasised the importance that the “figures are not placed on plinths, to disrupt a sense of hierarchy that surrounds many public monuments [...] They exist amongst the public and daily life and are an extension of the people who inhabit these spaces”.

New study shows visiting a museum can reduce anxiety and chronic pain

New research from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that visiting museums and art galleries can reduce the effects of anxiety, depression and chronic pain, as well as leading to an increase in empathy and cognitive function. The study by researchers Katherine Cotter and James O. Pawelski, titled ‘Art Museums As Institutions for Human Flourishing’ was published in the the Journal of Positive Psychology, and was composed from the results of over 100 research articles and reports. Their findings concluded that visiting museums reduced stress levels and anxiety, and that viewing figurative art led to a lowering in blood pressure. On a wider societal level, the research suggested that visits to art galleries encouraged positive social interaction, with visitors reporting a decrease in feelings of a social isolation, an increased ability to form new personal connections, and “higher levels of reflection on societal topics (e.g. participating in community affairs, concerns for societal issues, contributing to the well-being of others), suggesting that the experience of the visit encourages different forms of reflection and thought processes”.

Looking to spend more time in galleries in light of this news? Download the gowithYamo app now to see the latest exhibitions showing near you!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/07/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up

Francis Bacon in his 7 Reece Mews Studio (c.1970s), © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Tate returns 1,000-piece Francis Bacon archive over questions of authenticity

An archive of over 1,000 documents and sketches purported to be from the studio of Francis Bacon, once valued at £20m, is to be returned to its doner after questions have been raised regarding its authenticity. A statement from Tate states that research by art historians “has raised credible doubts about the nature and quality of the material”, and that in any case, “any potential it held to improve the public’s understanding of Bacon’s art has been exhausted”. Barry Joule - donor of the archive and close friend of the artist - has maintained the collection’s authenticity since questions were first raised, telling The Observer in April that he has ‘turn[ed] his back on the Tate forever’, and plans to offer hundreds of additional items from Bacon’s studio to the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Such deaccessioning is rare from the Tate, and is even prohibited in most cases by a Parliamentary act, though this does not apply to archival material such as the Joule collection. The archive itself, as reported by the Tate, “has been offered back to the donor, in line with the donor’s wishes”.

Lost #6, Ryota Kuwakabo (2012). Photo: Osamu Nakamura

Students trample artwork at Japanese art fair

The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale, held in Japan’s Niigata Prefecture, was shocked at the destruction of two pieces of art at the hands of rampaging students. The junior high students reportedly irreparably trampled Japanese artist Ryota Kuwakubo’s installation Lost #6, depicting a miniature train and light display, and damaged the multimedia piece Wellenwanne LFO by German artist Carsten Nicolai. The Triennale’ eighth edition opened on 29th April, having been delayed from 2021, and features 230 works from artists around the world. Following the incident, and the report from Japanese national newspaper The Mainichi confirming the Lost #6 to be damaged beyond repair, Kuwakubo released a statement on Twitter, in which he wrote that, while “the result alone may have crossed the line, [...] no one was hurt. Indeed, the work was destroyed, but a thing is a thing”. He went on to reaffirm that “from a physical point of view, the situation is not so serious”, and took the opportunity to sympathise with the students, and implore that communities provide spaces “to let them express their inner frustrations, anger, and desires in different ways”.

Thomas J. Price, pictured with his sculpture Warm Shores (2022) outside Hackney Town Hall. Photo: Damian Griffiths.

National Monuments to Windrush erected

Honouring the thousands of West Indian migrants of the Windrush Generation who moved to the UK following the Second World War, two major public sculptures have been installed in London. To commemorate the fourth anniversary of Windrush Day, a bronze monument by Jamaican artist Basil Watson depicting new arrivals from the Caribbean standing on suitcases was unveiled in Waterloo Station, and serves as the official National Windrush Monument, with Watson describing it as tribute to the migrants’ “ambition, courage and contribution to Britain”. In the same week, a statue by Thomas J. Price was unveiled in Hackney, funded by his winning of the Hackney Windrush Art Commission in 2020. For his sculpture, titled Warm Shores, Price used a 3D-scanning device to digitally photograph Hackney residents with a personal connection to Windrush, with the clothing of the finished bronze statues by historical research. Speaking about his piece, Price emphasised the importance that the “figures are not placed on plinths, to disrupt a sense of hierarchy that surrounds many public monuments [...] They exist amongst the public and daily life and are an extension of the people who inhabit these spaces”.

New study shows visiting a museum can reduce anxiety and chronic pain

New research from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that visiting museums and art galleries can reduce the effects of anxiety, depression and chronic pain, as well as leading to an increase in empathy and cognitive function. The study by researchers Katherine Cotter and James O. Pawelski, titled ‘Art Museums As Institutions for Human Flourishing’ was published in the the Journal of Positive Psychology, and was composed from the results of over 100 research articles and reports. Their findings concluded that visiting museums reduced stress levels and anxiety, and that viewing figurative art led to a lowering in blood pressure. On a wider societal level, the research suggested that visits to art galleries encouraged positive social interaction, with visitors reporting a decrease in feelings of a social isolation, an increased ability to form new personal connections, and “higher levels of reflection on societal topics (e.g. participating in community affairs, concerns for societal issues, contributing to the well-being of others), suggesting that the experience of the visit encourages different forms of reflection and thought processes”.

Looking to spend more time in galleries in light of this news? Download the gowithYamo app now to see the latest exhibitions showing near you!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/07/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We bring you the art world's biggest stories from June 2022...

Francis Bacon in his 7 Reece Mews Studio (c.1970s), © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Tate returns 1,000-piece Francis Bacon archive over questions of authenticity

An archive of over 1,000 documents and sketches purported to be from the studio of Francis Bacon, once valued at £20m, is to be returned to its doner after questions have been raised regarding its authenticity. A statement from Tate states that research by art historians “has raised credible doubts about the nature and quality of the material”, and that in any case, “any potential it held to improve the public’s understanding of Bacon’s art has been exhausted”. Barry Joule - donor of the archive and close friend of the artist - has maintained the collection’s authenticity since questions were first raised, telling The Observer in April that he has ‘turn[ed] his back on the Tate forever’, and plans to offer hundreds of additional items from Bacon’s studio to the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Such deaccessioning is rare from the Tate, and is even prohibited in most cases by a Parliamentary act, though this does not apply to archival material such as the Joule collection. The archive itself, as reported by the Tate, “has been offered back to the donor, in line with the donor’s wishes”.

Lost #6, Ryota Kuwakabo (2012). Photo: Osamu Nakamura

Students trample artwork at Japanese art fair

The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale, held in Japan’s Niigata Prefecture, was shocked at the destruction of two pieces of art at the hands of rampaging students. The junior high students reportedly irreparably trampled Japanese artist Ryota Kuwakubo’s installation Lost #6, depicting a miniature train and light display, and damaged the multimedia piece Wellenwanne LFO by German artist Carsten Nicolai. The Triennale’ eighth edition opened on 29th April, having been delayed from 2021, and features 230 works from artists around the world. Following the incident, and the report from Japanese national newspaper The Mainichi confirming the Lost #6 to be damaged beyond repair, Kuwakubo released a statement on Twitter, in which he wrote that, while “the result alone may have crossed the line, [...] no one was hurt. Indeed, the work was destroyed, but a thing is a thing”. He went on to reaffirm that “from a physical point of view, the situation is not so serious”, and took the opportunity to sympathise with the students, and implore that communities provide spaces “to let them express their inner frustrations, anger, and desires in different ways”.

Thomas J. Price, pictured with his sculpture Warm Shores (2022) outside Hackney Town Hall. Photo: Damian Griffiths.

National Monuments to Windrush erected

Honouring the thousands of West Indian migrants of the Windrush Generation who moved to the UK following the Second World War, two major public sculptures have been installed in London. To commemorate the fourth anniversary of Windrush Day, a bronze monument by Jamaican artist Basil Watson depicting new arrivals from the Caribbean standing on suitcases was unveiled in Waterloo Station, and serves as the official National Windrush Monument, with Watson describing it as tribute to the migrants’ “ambition, courage and contribution to Britain”. In the same week, a statue by Thomas J. Price was unveiled in Hackney, funded by his winning of the Hackney Windrush Art Commission in 2020. For his sculpture, titled Warm Shores, Price used a 3D-scanning device to digitally photograph Hackney residents with a personal connection to Windrush, with the clothing of the finished bronze statues by historical research. Speaking about his piece, Price emphasised the importance that the “figures are not placed on plinths, to disrupt a sense of hierarchy that surrounds many public monuments [...] They exist amongst the public and daily life and are an extension of the people who inhabit these spaces”.

New study shows visiting a museum can reduce anxiety and chronic pain

New research from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that visiting museums and art galleries can reduce the effects of anxiety, depression and chronic pain, as well as leading to an increase in empathy and cognitive function. The study by researchers Katherine Cotter and James O. Pawelski, titled ‘Art Museums As Institutions for Human Flourishing’ was published in the the Journal of Positive Psychology, and was composed from the results of over 100 research articles and reports. Their findings concluded that visiting museums reduced stress levels and anxiety, and that viewing figurative art led to a lowering in blood pressure. On a wider societal level, the research suggested that visits to art galleries encouraged positive social interaction, with visitors reporting a decrease in feelings of a social isolation, an increased ability to form new personal connections, and “higher levels of reflection on societal topics (e.g. participating in community affairs, concerns for societal issues, contributing to the well-being of others), suggesting that the experience of the visit encourages different forms of reflection and thought processes”.

Looking to spend more time in galleries in light of this news? Download the gowithYamo app now to see the latest exhibitions showing near you!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/07/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We bring you the art world's biggest stories from June 2022...

Francis Bacon in his 7 Reece Mews Studio (c.1970s), © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Tate returns 1,000-piece Francis Bacon archive over questions of authenticity

An archive of over 1,000 documents and sketches purported to be from the studio of Francis Bacon, once valued at £20m, is to be returned to its doner after questions have been raised regarding its authenticity. A statement from Tate states that research by art historians “has raised credible doubts about the nature and quality of the material”, and that in any case, “any potential it held to improve the public’s understanding of Bacon’s art has been exhausted”. Barry Joule - donor of the archive and close friend of the artist - has maintained the collection’s authenticity since questions were first raised, telling The Observer in April that he has ‘turn[ed] his back on the Tate forever’, and plans to offer hundreds of additional items from Bacon’s studio to the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Such deaccessioning is rare from the Tate, and is even prohibited in most cases by a Parliamentary act, though this does not apply to archival material such as the Joule collection. The archive itself, as reported by the Tate, “has been offered back to the donor, in line with the donor’s wishes”.

Lost #6, Ryota Kuwakabo (2012). Photo: Osamu Nakamura

Students trample artwork at Japanese art fair

The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale, held in Japan’s Niigata Prefecture, was shocked at the destruction of two pieces of art at the hands of rampaging students. The junior high students reportedly irreparably trampled Japanese artist Ryota Kuwakubo’s installation Lost #6, depicting a miniature train and light display, and damaged the multimedia piece Wellenwanne LFO by German artist Carsten Nicolai. The Triennale’ eighth edition opened on 29th April, having been delayed from 2021, and features 230 works from artists around the world. Following the incident, and the report from Japanese national newspaper The Mainichi confirming the Lost #6 to be damaged beyond repair, Kuwakubo released a statement on Twitter, in which he wrote that, while “the result alone may have crossed the line, [...] no one was hurt. Indeed, the work was destroyed, but a thing is a thing”. He went on to reaffirm that “from a physical point of view, the situation is not so serious”, and took the opportunity to sympathise with the students, and implore that communities provide spaces “to let them express their inner frustrations, anger, and desires in different ways”.

Thomas J. Price, pictured with his sculpture Warm Shores (2022) outside Hackney Town Hall. Photo: Damian Griffiths.

National Monuments to Windrush erected

Honouring the thousands of West Indian migrants of the Windrush Generation who moved to the UK following the Second World War, two major public sculptures have been installed in London. To commemorate the fourth anniversary of Windrush Day, a bronze monument by Jamaican artist Basil Watson depicting new arrivals from the Caribbean standing on suitcases was unveiled in Waterloo Station, and serves as the official National Windrush Monument, with Watson describing it as tribute to the migrants’ “ambition, courage and contribution to Britain”. In the same week, a statue by Thomas J. Price was unveiled in Hackney, funded by his winning of the Hackney Windrush Art Commission in 2020. For his sculpture, titled Warm Shores, Price used a 3D-scanning device to digitally photograph Hackney residents with a personal connection to Windrush, with the clothing of the finished bronze statues by historical research. Speaking about his piece, Price emphasised the importance that the “figures are not placed on plinths, to disrupt a sense of hierarchy that surrounds many public monuments [...] They exist amongst the public and daily life and are an extension of the people who inhabit these spaces”.

New study shows visiting a museum can reduce anxiety and chronic pain

New research from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that visiting museums and art galleries can reduce the effects of anxiety, depression and chronic pain, as well as leading to an increase in empathy and cognitive function. The study by researchers Katherine Cotter and James O. Pawelski, titled ‘Art Museums As Institutions for Human Flourishing’ was published in the the Journal of Positive Psychology, and was composed from the results of over 100 research articles and reports. Their findings concluded that visiting museums reduced stress levels and anxiety, and that viewing figurative art led to a lowering in blood pressure. On a wider societal level, the research suggested that visits to art galleries encouraged positive social interaction, with visitors reporting a decrease in feelings of a social isolation, an increased ability to form new personal connections, and “higher levels of reflection on societal topics (e.g. participating in community affairs, concerns for societal issues, contributing to the well-being of others), suggesting that the experience of the visit encourages different forms of reflection and thought processes”.

Looking to spend more time in galleries in light of this news? Download the gowithYamo app now to see the latest exhibitions showing near you!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/07/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We bring you the art world's biggest stories from June 2022...

Francis Bacon in his 7 Reece Mews Studio (c.1970s), © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Tate returns 1,000-piece Francis Bacon archive over questions of authenticity

An archive of over 1,000 documents and sketches purported to be from the studio of Francis Bacon, once valued at £20m, is to be returned to its doner after questions have been raised regarding its authenticity. A statement from Tate states that research by art historians “has raised credible doubts about the nature and quality of the material”, and that in any case, “any potential it held to improve the public’s understanding of Bacon’s art has been exhausted”. Barry Joule - donor of the archive and close friend of the artist - has maintained the collection’s authenticity since questions were first raised, telling The Observer in April that he has ‘turn[ed] his back on the Tate forever’, and plans to offer hundreds of additional items from Bacon’s studio to the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Such deaccessioning is rare from the Tate, and is even prohibited in most cases by a Parliamentary act, though this does not apply to archival material such as the Joule collection. The archive itself, as reported by the Tate, “has been offered back to the donor, in line with the donor’s wishes”.

Lost #6, Ryota Kuwakabo (2012). Photo: Osamu Nakamura

Students trample artwork at Japanese art fair

The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale, held in Japan’s Niigata Prefecture, was shocked at the destruction of two pieces of art at the hands of rampaging students. The junior high students reportedly irreparably trampled Japanese artist Ryota Kuwakubo’s installation Lost #6, depicting a miniature train and light display, and damaged the multimedia piece Wellenwanne LFO by German artist Carsten Nicolai. The Triennale’ eighth edition opened on 29th April, having been delayed from 2021, and features 230 works from artists around the world. Following the incident, and the report from Japanese national newspaper The Mainichi confirming the Lost #6 to be damaged beyond repair, Kuwakubo released a statement on Twitter, in which he wrote that, while “the result alone may have crossed the line, [...] no one was hurt. Indeed, the work was destroyed, but a thing is a thing”. He went on to reaffirm that “from a physical point of view, the situation is not so serious”, and took the opportunity to sympathise with the students, and implore that communities provide spaces “to let them express their inner frustrations, anger, and desires in different ways”.

Thomas J. Price, pictured with his sculpture Warm Shores (2022) outside Hackney Town Hall. Photo: Damian Griffiths.

National Monuments to Windrush erected

Honouring the thousands of West Indian migrants of the Windrush Generation who moved to the UK following the Second World War, two major public sculptures have been installed in London. To commemorate the fourth anniversary of Windrush Day, a bronze monument by Jamaican artist Basil Watson depicting new arrivals from the Caribbean standing on suitcases was unveiled in Waterloo Station, and serves as the official National Windrush Monument, with Watson describing it as tribute to the migrants’ “ambition, courage and contribution to Britain”. In the same week, a statue by Thomas J. Price was unveiled in Hackney, funded by his winning of the Hackney Windrush Art Commission in 2020. For his sculpture, titled Warm Shores, Price used a 3D-scanning device to digitally photograph Hackney residents with a personal connection to Windrush, with the clothing of the finished bronze statues by historical research. Speaking about his piece, Price emphasised the importance that the “figures are not placed on plinths, to disrupt a sense of hierarchy that surrounds many public monuments [...] They exist amongst the public and daily life and are an extension of the people who inhabit these spaces”.

New study shows visiting a museum can reduce anxiety and chronic pain

New research from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that visiting museums and art galleries can reduce the effects of anxiety, depression and chronic pain, as well as leading to an increase in empathy and cognitive function. The study by researchers Katherine Cotter and James O. Pawelski, titled ‘Art Museums As Institutions for Human Flourishing’ was published in the the Journal of Positive Psychology, and was composed from the results of over 100 research articles and reports. Their findings concluded that visiting museums reduced stress levels and anxiety, and that viewing figurative art led to a lowering in blood pressure. On a wider societal level, the research suggested that visits to art galleries encouraged positive social interaction, with visitors reporting a decrease in feelings of a social isolation, an increased ability to form new personal connections, and “higher levels of reflection on societal topics (e.g. participating in community affairs, concerns for societal issues, contributing to the well-being of others), suggesting that the experience of the visit encourages different forms of reflection and thought processes”.

Looking to spend more time in galleries in light of this news? Download the gowithYamo app now to see the latest exhibitions showing near you!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
01/07/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We bring you the art world's biggest stories from June 2022...

Francis Bacon in his 7 Reece Mews Studio (c.1970s), © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Tate returns 1,000-piece Francis Bacon archive over questions of authenticity

An archive of over 1,000 documents and sketches purported to be from the studio of Francis Bacon, once valued at £20m, is to be returned to its doner after questions have been raised regarding its authenticity. A statement from Tate states that research by art historians “has raised credible doubts about the nature and quality of the material”, and that in any case, “any potential it held to improve the public’s understanding of Bacon’s art has been exhausted”. Barry Joule - donor of the archive and close friend of the artist - has maintained the collection’s authenticity since questions were first raised, telling The Observer in April that he has ‘turn[ed] his back on the Tate forever’, and plans to offer hundreds of additional items from Bacon’s studio to the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Such deaccessioning is rare from the Tate, and is even prohibited in most cases by a Parliamentary act, though this does not apply to archival material such as the Joule collection. The archive itself, as reported by the Tate, “has been offered back to the donor, in line with the donor’s wishes”.

Lost #6, Ryota Kuwakabo (2012). Photo: Osamu Nakamura

Students trample artwork at Japanese art fair

The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale, held in Japan’s Niigata Prefecture, was shocked at the destruction of two pieces of art at the hands of rampaging students. The junior high students reportedly irreparably trampled Japanese artist Ryota Kuwakubo’s installation Lost #6, depicting a miniature train and light display, and damaged the multimedia piece Wellenwanne LFO by German artist Carsten Nicolai. The Triennale’ eighth edition opened on 29th April, having been delayed from 2021, and features 230 works from artists around the world. Following the incident, and the report from Japanese national newspaper The Mainichi confirming the Lost #6 to be damaged beyond repair, Kuwakubo released a statement on Twitter, in which he wrote that, while “the result alone may have crossed the line, [...] no one was hurt. Indeed, the work was destroyed, but a thing is a thing”. He went on to reaffirm that “from a physical point of view, the situation is not so serious”, and took the opportunity to sympathise with the students, and implore that communities provide spaces “to let them express their inner frustrations, anger, and desires in different ways”.

Thomas J. Price, pictured with his sculpture Warm Shores (2022) outside Hackney Town Hall. Photo: Damian Griffiths.

National Monuments to Windrush erected

Honouring the thousands of West Indian migrants of the Windrush Generation who moved to the UK following the Second World War, two major public sculptures have been installed in London. To commemorate the fourth anniversary of Windrush Day, a bronze monument by Jamaican artist Basil Watson depicting new arrivals from the Caribbean standing on suitcases was unveiled in Waterloo Station, and serves as the official National Windrush Monument, with Watson describing it as tribute to the migrants’ “ambition, courage and contribution to Britain”. In the same week, a statue by Thomas J. Price was unveiled in Hackney, funded by his winning of the Hackney Windrush Art Commission in 2020. For his sculpture, titled Warm Shores, Price used a 3D-scanning device to digitally photograph Hackney residents with a personal connection to Windrush, with the clothing of the finished bronze statues by historical research. Speaking about his piece, Price emphasised the importance that the “figures are not placed on plinths, to disrupt a sense of hierarchy that surrounds many public monuments [...] They exist amongst the public and daily life and are an extension of the people who inhabit these spaces”.

New study shows visiting a museum can reduce anxiety and chronic pain

New research from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that visiting museums and art galleries can reduce the effects of anxiety, depression and chronic pain, as well as leading to an increase in empathy and cognitive function. The study by researchers Katherine Cotter and James O. Pawelski, titled ‘Art Museums As Institutions for Human Flourishing’ was published in the the Journal of Positive Psychology, and was composed from the results of over 100 research articles and reports. Their findings concluded that visiting museums reduced stress levels and anxiety, and that viewing figurative art led to a lowering in blood pressure. On a wider societal level, the research suggested that visits to art galleries encouraged positive social interaction, with visitors reporting a decrease in feelings of a social isolation, an increased ability to form new personal connections, and “higher levels of reflection on societal topics (e.g. participating in community affairs, concerns for societal issues, contributing to the well-being of others), suggesting that the experience of the visit encourages different forms of reflection and thought processes”.

Looking to spend more time in galleries in light of this news? Download the gowithYamo app now to see the latest exhibitions showing near you!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
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