05/08/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this August
We give our recommendations for the best exhibitions running around the UK this August
Bristol Archives: Empire through the Lens installation view

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham

With the recent repatriation of various stolen objects to their rightful owners - most notably from galleries around the world returning Benin Bronzes and the renewed discussion and refocused efforts to return the Parthenon Marbles to their rightful home in Athens- this exhibition at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre is particularly timely, taking a nuanced and critical look at the role of colonialism in the display of archaeological artefacts. In Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens, objects from the British Empire and Commonwealth Collection are presented alongside the cultural context of colonialist debates, as well as works by contemporary Birmingham artists, including three new sculptural works by Carla Busuttil, Faisal Hussain and Mahtab Hussain interrogating the role that colonialism has played - and indeed continues to play - in the portrayal of such objects, as well as the relationship between Britain and the rest of the world which such portrayal implies.

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens is showing at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham until 11th September 2022

Compost, Alexandra Toland, 2022

We are Compost/Composting the We at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow

Taking as a metaphorical jumping-off point the cyclical nature of composting, this exhibition at Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts features works by Alexandra Toland, Asad Raza and Désirée Coral, with each piece “separate but entangled” to create a display demonstrating the transformative - and transformable - power of knowledge and art. The exhibition begins with the first UK showing of Asad Raza’s Absorption, in which 60 tonnes of artificial neosoil is offered to visitors for their own domestic and community projects. With the soil created from recycled waste materials, Raza’s piece gives a literal interpretation of the exhibition’s title, and leads elegantly to the research installation Gaia Glossary, curated by Alexandra Toland and Lea Wittich. Here, the artists encourage the ‘recycling’ of knowledge, creating metaphorical compost in which new ideas can grow out of literature, resources, tools and objects. These ideas are finally put on display in the third exhibit, Désirée Coral’s Eating the Ancestors, in which the actions of past generations are investigated to further understand the present and develop ideas on the collective ‘WE’.

We are Compost/Composting the We is showing at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts until until 10th September 2022

Hat Trick, Sue Spaull

The Football Art Prize at Millennium Gallery, Sheffield

Still buzzing from the Lionesses recent victory at the Euros and looking for some art focused on the beautiful game? Look no further than this exhibition at Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery, displaying the work of 50 international artists who responded to the call for football-based artworks. Bringing together photography, film, painting and collage, The Football Art Prize isn’t just for dedicated fans of the sport; the works on display consider football not just as a shared cultural experience, but a bringing together of communities both national and international, from the heroes worshipped at the height of the Premier League right down to the grassroots work of local teams. The gallery promises that the works on display don’t just illustrate the worldwide love of football, but also “reflect the entirety of the human experience”. Plus, for any art and football-lovers who can’t make it to Sheffield, the exhibition will be touring to Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens in November.

The Football Art Prize is showing at Millennium Gallery until 30th October 2022

Jamaican Man in Profile (Henry Thomas), Glyn Philpot, 1934-5

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

Bringing together over 80 paintings, drawings and sculptures - some of which haven’t been on display to the public in decades - Flesh and Spirit at Chichester’s Pallant House Gallery serves as a retrospective on the work of sought-after portrait artist Glyn Philpot (1884-1937). Tracking Philpot’s development from Edwardian portraiture to his radically modern style in the 1930s, the show stands as the first major exhibition of the artist’s work in almost 40 years. It wasn’t just Philpot’s style that was radical however; while the subjects on display here include several famous figures including Loelia, Duchess of Westminster and Siegfried Sassoon, Philpot was also known for his portrayals of male lovers, religious subjects and unnamed black sitters. As such, central to the exhibition is a consideration of the artist’s pioneering work in the field of artistic representation and the wider discussions of identity which persist to this day in the art world.

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit is showing at Pallant House until 23rd October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
05/08/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this August
We give our recommendations for the best exhibitions running around the UK this August
Bristol Archives: Empire through the Lens installation view

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham

With the recent repatriation of various stolen objects to their rightful owners - most notably from galleries around the world returning Benin Bronzes and the renewed discussion and refocused efforts to return the Parthenon Marbles to their rightful home in Athens- this exhibition at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre is particularly timely, taking a nuanced and critical look at the role of colonialism in the display of archaeological artefacts. In Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens, objects from the British Empire and Commonwealth Collection are presented alongside the cultural context of colonialist debates, as well as works by contemporary Birmingham artists, including three new sculptural works by Carla Busuttil, Faisal Hussain and Mahtab Hussain interrogating the role that colonialism has played - and indeed continues to play - in the portrayal of such objects, as well as the relationship between Britain and the rest of the world which such portrayal implies.

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens is showing at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham until 11th September 2022

Compost, Alexandra Toland, 2022

We are Compost/Composting the We at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow

Taking as a metaphorical jumping-off point the cyclical nature of composting, this exhibition at Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts features works by Alexandra Toland, Asad Raza and Désirée Coral, with each piece “separate but entangled” to create a display demonstrating the transformative - and transformable - power of knowledge and art. The exhibition begins with the first UK showing of Asad Raza’s Absorption, in which 60 tonnes of artificial neosoil is offered to visitors for their own domestic and community projects. With the soil created from recycled waste materials, Raza’s piece gives a literal interpretation of the exhibition’s title, and leads elegantly to the research installation Gaia Glossary, curated by Alexandra Toland and Lea Wittich. Here, the artists encourage the ‘recycling’ of knowledge, creating metaphorical compost in which new ideas can grow out of literature, resources, tools and objects. These ideas are finally put on display in the third exhibit, Désirée Coral’s Eating the Ancestors, in which the actions of past generations are investigated to further understand the present and develop ideas on the collective ‘WE’.

We are Compost/Composting the We is showing at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts until until 10th September 2022

Hat Trick, Sue Spaull

The Football Art Prize at Millennium Gallery, Sheffield

Still buzzing from the Lionesses recent victory at the Euros and looking for some art focused on the beautiful game? Look no further than this exhibition at Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery, displaying the work of 50 international artists who responded to the call for football-based artworks. Bringing together photography, film, painting and collage, The Football Art Prize isn’t just for dedicated fans of the sport; the works on display consider football not just as a shared cultural experience, but a bringing together of communities both national and international, from the heroes worshipped at the height of the Premier League right down to the grassroots work of local teams. The gallery promises that the works on display don’t just illustrate the worldwide love of football, but also “reflect the entirety of the human experience”. Plus, for any art and football-lovers who can’t make it to Sheffield, the exhibition will be touring to Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens in November.

The Football Art Prize is showing at Millennium Gallery until 30th October 2022

Jamaican Man in Profile (Henry Thomas), Glyn Philpot, 1934-5

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

Bringing together over 80 paintings, drawings and sculptures - some of which haven’t been on display to the public in decades - Flesh and Spirit at Chichester’s Pallant House Gallery serves as a retrospective on the work of sought-after portrait artist Glyn Philpot (1884-1937). Tracking Philpot’s development from Edwardian portraiture to his radically modern style in the 1930s, the show stands as the first major exhibition of the artist’s work in almost 40 years. It wasn’t just Philpot’s style that was radical however; while the subjects on display here include several famous figures including Loelia, Duchess of Westminster and Siegfried Sassoon, Philpot was also known for his portrayals of male lovers, religious subjects and unnamed black sitters. As such, central to the exhibition is a consideration of the artist’s pioneering work in the field of artistic representation and the wider discussions of identity which persist to this day in the art world.

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit is showing at Pallant House until 23rd October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
05/08/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this August
We give our recommendations for the best exhibitions running around the UK this August
Bristol Archives: Empire through the Lens installation view

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham

With the recent repatriation of various stolen objects to their rightful owners - most notably from galleries around the world returning Benin Bronzes and the renewed discussion and refocused efforts to return the Parthenon Marbles to their rightful home in Athens- this exhibition at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre is particularly timely, taking a nuanced and critical look at the role of colonialism in the display of archaeological artefacts. In Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens, objects from the British Empire and Commonwealth Collection are presented alongside the cultural context of colonialist debates, as well as works by contemporary Birmingham artists, including three new sculptural works by Carla Busuttil, Faisal Hussain and Mahtab Hussain interrogating the role that colonialism has played - and indeed continues to play - in the portrayal of such objects, as well as the relationship between Britain and the rest of the world which such portrayal implies.

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens is showing at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham until 11th September 2022

Compost, Alexandra Toland, 2022

We are Compost/Composting the We at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow

Taking as a metaphorical jumping-off point the cyclical nature of composting, this exhibition at Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts features works by Alexandra Toland, Asad Raza and Désirée Coral, with each piece “separate but entangled” to create a display demonstrating the transformative - and transformable - power of knowledge and art. The exhibition begins with the first UK showing of Asad Raza’s Absorption, in which 60 tonnes of artificial neosoil is offered to visitors for their own domestic and community projects. With the soil created from recycled waste materials, Raza’s piece gives a literal interpretation of the exhibition’s title, and leads elegantly to the research installation Gaia Glossary, curated by Alexandra Toland and Lea Wittich. Here, the artists encourage the ‘recycling’ of knowledge, creating metaphorical compost in which new ideas can grow out of literature, resources, tools and objects. These ideas are finally put on display in the third exhibit, Désirée Coral’s Eating the Ancestors, in which the actions of past generations are investigated to further understand the present and develop ideas on the collective ‘WE’.

We are Compost/Composting the We is showing at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts until until 10th September 2022

Hat Trick, Sue Spaull

The Football Art Prize at Millennium Gallery, Sheffield

Still buzzing from the Lionesses recent victory at the Euros and looking for some art focused on the beautiful game? Look no further than this exhibition at Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery, displaying the work of 50 international artists who responded to the call for football-based artworks. Bringing together photography, film, painting and collage, The Football Art Prize isn’t just for dedicated fans of the sport; the works on display consider football not just as a shared cultural experience, but a bringing together of communities both national and international, from the heroes worshipped at the height of the Premier League right down to the grassroots work of local teams. The gallery promises that the works on display don’t just illustrate the worldwide love of football, but also “reflect the entirety of the human experience”. Plus, for any art and football-lovers who can’t make it to Sheffield, the exhibition will be touring to Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens in November.

The Football Art Prize is showing at Millennium Gallery until 30th October 2022

Jamaican Man in Profile (Henry Thomas), Glyn Philpot, 1934-5

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

Bringing together over 80 paintings, drawings and sculptures - some of which haven’t been on display to the public in decades - Flesh and Spirit at Chichester’s Pallant House Gallery serves as a retrospective on the work of sought-after portrait artist Glyn Philpot (1884-1937). Tracking Philpot’s development from Edwardian portraiture to his radically modern style in the 1930s, the show stands as the first major exhibition of the artist’s work in almost 40 years. It wasn’t just Philpot’s style that was radical however; while the subjects on display here include several famous figures including Loelia, Duchess of Westminster and Siegfried Sassoon, Philpot was also known for his portrayals of male lovers, religious subjects and unnamed black sitters. As such, central to the exhibition is a consideration of the artist’s pioneering work in the field of artistic representation and the wider discussions of identity which persist to this day in the art world.

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit is showing at Pallant House until 23rd October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
05/08/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this August
We give our recommendations for the best exhibitions running around the UK this August
Bristol Archives: Empire through the Lens installation view

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham

With the recent repatriation of various stolen objects to their rightful owners - most notably from galleries around the world returning Benin Bronzes and the renewed discussion and refocused efforts to return the Parthenon Marbles to their rightful home in Athens- this exhibition at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre is particularly timely, taking a nuanced and critical look at the role of colonialism in the display of archaeological artefacts. In Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens, objects from the British Empire and Commonwealth Collection are presented alongside the cultural context of colonialist debates, as well as works by contemporary Birmingham artists, including three new sculptural works by Carla Busuttil, Faisal Hussain and Mahtab Hussain interrogating the role that colonialism has played - and indeed continues to play - in the portrayal of such objects, as well as the relationship between Britain and the rest of the world which such portrayal implies.

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens is showing at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham until 11th September 2022

Compost, Alexandra Toland, 2022

We are Compost/Composting the We at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow

Taking as a metaphorical jumping-off point the cyclical nature of composting, this exhibition at Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts features works by Alexandra Toland, Asad Raza and Désirée Coral, with each piece “separate but entangled” to create a display demonstrating the transformative - and transformable - power of knowledge and art. The exhibition begins with the first UK showing of Asad Raza’s Absorption, in which 60 tonnes of artificial neosoil is offered to visitors for their own domestic and community projects. With the soil created from recycled waste materials, Raza’s piece gives a literal interpretation of the exhibition’s title, and leads elegantly to the research installation Gaia Glossary, curated by Alexandra Toland and Lea Wittich. Here, the artists encourage the ‘recycling’ of knowledge, creating metaphorical compost in which new ideas can grow out of literature, resources, tools and objects. These ideas are finally put on display in the third exhibit, Désirée Coral’s Eating the Ancestors, in which the actions of past generations are investigated to further understand the present and develop ideas on the collective ‘WE’.

We are Compost/Composting the We is showing at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts until until 10th September 2022

Hat Trick, Sue Spaull

The Football Art Prize at Millennium Gallery, Sheffield

Still buzzing from the Lionesses recent victory at the Euros and looking for some art focused on the beautiful game? Look no further than this exhibition at Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery, displaying the work of 50 international artists who responded to the call for football-based artworks. Bringing together photography, film, painting and collage, The Football Art Prize isn’t just for dedicated fans of the sport; the works on display consider football not just as a shared cultural experience, but a bringing together of communities both national and international, from the heroes worshipped at the height of the Premier League right down to the grassroots work of local teams. The gallery promises that the works on display don’t just illustrate the worldwide love of football, but also “reflect the entirety of the human experience”. Plus, for any art and football-lovers who can’t make it to Sheffield, the exhibition will be touring to Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens in November.

The Football Art Prize is showing at Millennium Gallery until 30th October 2022

Jamaican Man in Profile (Henry Thomas), Glyn Philpot, 1934-5

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

Bringing together over 80 paintings, drawings and sculptures - some of which haven’t been on display to the public in decades - Flesh and Spirit at Chichester’s Pallant House Gallery serves as a retrospective on the work of sought-after portrait artist Glyn Philpot (1884-1937). Tracking Philpot’s development from Edwardian portraiture to his radically modern style in the 1930s, the show stands as the first major exhibition of the artist’s work in almost 40 years. It wasn’t just Philpot’s style that was radical however; while the subjects on display here include several famous figures including Loelia, Duchess of Westminster and Siegfried Sassoon, Philpot was also known for his portrayals of male lovers, religious subjects and unnamed black sitters. As such, central to the exhibition is a consideration of the artist’s pioneering work in the field of artistic representation and the wider discussions of identity which persist to this day in the art world.

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit is showing at Pallant House until 23rd October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
05/08/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this August
We give our recommendations for the best exhibitions running around the UK this August
Bristol Archives: Empire through the Lens installation view

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham

With the recent repatriation of various stolen objects to their rightful owners - most notably from galleries around the world returning Benin Bronzes and the renewed discussion and refocused efforts to return the Parthenon Marbles to their rightful home in Athens- this exhibition at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre is particularly timely, taking a nuanced and critical look at the role of colonialism in the display of archaeological artefacts. In Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens, objects from the British Empire and Commonwealth Collection are presented alongside the cultural context of colonialist debates, as well as works by contemporary Birmingham artists, including three new sculptural works by Carla Busuttil, Faisal Hussain and Mahtab Hussain interrogating the role that colonialism has played - and indeed continues to play - in the portrayal of such objects, as well as the relationship between Britain and the rest of the world which such portrayal implies.

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens is showing at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham until 11th September 2022

Compost, Alexandra Toland, 2022

We are Compost/Composting the We at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow

Taking as a metaphorical jumping-off point the cyclical nature of composting, this exhibition at Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts features works by Alexandra Toland, Asad Raza and Désirée Coral, with each piece “separate but entangled” to create a display demonstrating the transformative - and transformable - power of knowledge and art. The exhibition begins with the first UK showing of Asad Raza’s Absorption, in which 60 tonnes of artificial neosoil is offered to visitors for their own domestic and community projects. With the soil created from recycled waste materials, Raza’s piece gives a literal interpretation of the exhibition’s title, and leads elegantly to the research installation Gaia Glossary, curated by Alexandra Toland and Lea Wittich. Here, the artists encourage the ‘recycling’ of knowledge, creating metaphorical compost in which new ideas can grow out of literature, resources, tools and objects. These ideas are finally put on display in the third exhibit, Désirée Coral’s Eating the Ancestors, in which the actions of past generations are investigated to further understand the present and develop ideas on the collective ‘WE’.

We are Compost/Composting the We is showing at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts until until 10th September 2022

Hat Trick, Sue Spaull

The Football Art Prize at Millennium Gallery, Sheffield

Still buzzing from the Lionesses recent victory at the Euros and looking for some art focused on the beautiful game? Look no further than this exhibition at Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery, displaying the work of 50 international artists who responded to the call for football-based artworks. Bringing together photography, film, painting and collage, The Football Art Prize isn’t just for dedicated fans of the sport; the works on display consider football not just as a shared cultural experience, but a bringing together of communities both national and international, from the heroes worshipped at the height of the Premier League right down to the grassroots work of local teams. The gallery promises that the works on display don’t just illustrate the worldwide love of football, but also “reflect the entirety of the human experience”. Plus, for any art and football-lovers who can’t make it to Sheffield, the exhibition will be touring to Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens in November.

The Football Art Prize is showing at Millennium Gallery until 30th October 2022

Jamaican Man in Profile (Henry Thomas), Glyn Philpot, 1934-5

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

Bringing together over 80 paintings, drawings and sculptures - some of which haven’t been on display to the public in decades - Flesh and Spirit at Chichester’s Pallant House Gallery serves as a retrospective on the work of sought-after portrait artist Glyn Philpot (1884-1937). Tracking Philpot’s development from Edwardian portraiture to his radically modern style in the 1930s, the show stands as the first major exhibition of the artist’s work in almost 40 years. It wasn’t just Philpot’s style that was radical however; while the subjects on display here include several famous figures including Loelia, Duchess of Westminster and Siegfried Sassoon, Philpot was also known for his portrayals of male lovers, religious subjects and unnamed black sitters. As such, central to the exhibition is a consideration of the artist’s pioneering work in the field of artistic representation and the wider discussions of identity which persist to this day in the art world.

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit is showing at Pallant House until 23rd October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
05/08/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this August
Bristol Archives: Empire through the Lens installation view

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham

With the recent repatriation of various stolen objects to their rightful owners - most notably from galleries around the world returning Benin Bronzes and the renewed discussion and refocused efforts to return the Parthenon Marbles to their rightful home in Athens- this exhibition at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre is particularly timely, taking a nuanced and critical look at the role of colonialism in the display of archaeological artefacts. In Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens, objects from the British Empire and Commonwealth Collection are presented alongside the cultural context of colonialist debates, as well as works by contemporary Birmingham artists, including three new sculptural works by Carla Busuttil, Faisal Hussain and Mahtab Hussain interrogating the role that colonialism has played - and indeed continues to play - in the portrayal of such objects, as well as the relationship between Britain and the rest of the world which such portrayal implies.

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens is showing at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham until 11th September 2022

Compost, Alexandra Toland, 2022

We are Compost/Composting the We at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow

Taking as a metaphorical jumping-off point the cyclical nature of composting, this exhibition at Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts features works by Alexandra Toland, Asad Raza and Désirée Coral, with each piece “separate but entangled” to create a display demonstrating the transformative - and transformable - power of knowledge and art. The exhibition begins with the first UK showing of Asad Raza’s Absorption, in which 60 tonnes of artificial neosoil is offered to visitors for their own domestic and community projects. With the soil created from recycled waste materials, Raza’s piece gives a literal interpretation of the exhibition’s title, and leads elegantly to the research installation Gaia Glossary, curated by Alexandra Toland and Lea Wittich. Here, the artists encourage the ‘recycling’ of knowledge, creating metaphorical compost in which new ideas can grow out of literature, resources, tools and objects. These ideas are finally put on display in the third exhibit, Désirée Coral’s Eating the Ancestors, in which the actions of past generations are investigated to further understand the present and develop ideas on the collective ‘WE’.

We are Compost/Composting the We is showing at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts until until 10th September 2022

Hat Trick, Sue Spaull

The Football Art Prize at Millennium Gallery, Sheffield

Still buzzing from the Lionesses recent victory at the Euros and looking for some art focused on the beautiful game? Look no further than this exhibition at Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery, displaying the work of 50 international artists who responded to the call for football-based artworks. Bringing together photography, film, painting and collage, The Football Art Prize isn’t just for dedicated fans of the sport; the works on display consider football not just as a shared cultural experience, but a bringing together of communities both national and international, from the heroes worshipped at the height of the Premier League right down to the grassroots work of local teams. The gallery promises that the works on display don’t just illustrate the worldwide love of football, but also “reflect the entirety of the human experience”. Plus, for any art and football-lovers who can’t make it to Sheffield, the exhibition will be touring to Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens in November.

The Football Art Prize is showing at Millennium Gallery until 30th October 2022

Jamaican Man in Profile (Henry Thomas), Glyn Philpot, 1934-5

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

Bringing together over 80 paintings, drawings and sculptures - some of which haven’t been on display to the public in decades - Flesh and Spirit at Chichester’s Pallant House Gallery serves as a retrospective on the work of sought-after portrait artist Glyn Philpot (1884-1937). Tracking Philpot’s development from Edwardian portraiture to his radically modern style in the 1930s, the show stands as the first major exhibition of the artist’s work in almost 40 years. It wasn’t just Philpot’s style that was radical however; while the subjects on display here include several famous figures including Loelia, Duchess of Westminster and Siegfried Sassoon, Philpot was also known for his portrayals of male lovers, religious subjects and unnamed black sitters. As such, central to the exhibition is a consideration of the artist’s pioneering work in the field of artistic representation and the wider discussions of identity which persist to this day in the art world.

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit is showing at Pallant House until 23rd October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
05/08/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this August
We give our recommendations for the best exhibitions running around the UK this August
Bristol Archives: Empire through the Lens installation view

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham

With the recent repatriation of various stolen objects to their rightful owners - most notably from galleries around the world returning Benin Bronzes and the renewed discussion and refocused efforts to return the Parthenon Marbles to their rightful home in Athens- this exhibition at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre is particularly timely, taking a nuanced and critical look at the role of colonialism in the display of archaeological artefacts. In Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens, objects from the British Empire and Commonwealth Collection are presented alongside the cultural context of colonialist debates, as well as works by contemporary Birmingham artists, including three new sculptural works by Carla Busuttil, Faisal Hussain and Mahtab Hussain interrogating the role that colonialism has played - and indeed continues to play - in the portrayal of such objects, as well as the relationship between Britain and the rest of the world which such portrayal implies.

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens is showing at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham until 11th September 2022

Compost, Alexandra Toland, 2022

We are Compost/Composting the We at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow

Taking as a metaphorical jumping-off point the cyclical nature of composting, this exhibition at Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts features works by Alexandra Toland, Asad Raza and Désirée Coral, with each piece “separate but entangled” to create a display demonstrating the transformative - and transformable - power of knowledge and art. The exhibition begins with the first UK showing of Asad Raza’s Absorption, in which 60 tonnes of artificial neosoil is offered to visitors for their own domestic and community projects. With the soil created from recycled waste materials, Raza’s piece gives a literal interpretation of the exhibition’s title, and leads elegantly to the research installation Gaia Glossary, curated by Alexandra Toland and Lea Wittich. Here, the artists encourage the ‘recycling’ of knowledge, creating metaphorical compost in which new ideas can grow out of literature, resources, tools and objects. These ideas are finally put on display in the third exhibit, Désirée Coral’s Eating the Ancestors, in which the actions of past generations are investigated to further understand the present and develop ideas on the collective ‘WE’.

We are Compost/Composting the We is showing at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts until until 10th September 2022

Hat Trick, Sue Spaull

The Football Art Prize at Millennium Gallery, Sheffield

Still buzzing from the Lionesses recent victory at the Euros and looking for some art focused on the beautiful game? Look no further than this exhibition at Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery, displaying the work of 50 international artists who responded to the call for football-based artworks. Bringing together photography, film, painting and collage, The Football Art Prize isn’t just for dedicated fans of the sport; the works on display consider football not just as a shared cultural experience, but a bringing together of communities both national and international, from the heroes worshipped at the height of the Premier League right down to the grassroots work of local teams. The gallery promises that the works on display don’t just illustrate the worldwide love of football, but also “reflect the entirety of the human experience”. Plus, for any art and football-lovers who can’t make it to Sheffield, the exhibition will be touring to Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens in November.

The Football Art Prize is showing at Millennium Gallery until 30th October 2022

Jamaican Man in Profile (Henry Thomas), Glyn Philpot, 1934-5

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

Bringing together over 80 paintings, drawings and sculptures - some of which haven’t been on display to the public in decades - Flesh and Spirit at Chichester’s Pallant House Gallery serves as a retrospective on the work of sought-after portrait artist Glyn Philpot (1884-1937). Tracking Philpot’s development from Edwardian portraiture to his radically modern style in the 1930s, the show stands as the first major exhibition of the artist’s work in almost 40 years. It wasn’t just Philpot’s style that was radical however; while the subjects on display here include several famous figures including Loelia, Duchess of Westminster and Siegfried Sassoon, Philpot was also known for his portrayals of male lovers, religious subjects and unnamed black sitters. As such, central to the exhibition is a consideration of the artist’s pioneering work in the field of artistic representation and the wider discussions of identity which persist to this day in the art world.

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit is showing at Pallant House until 23rd October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
05/08/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this August
We give our recommendations for the best exhibitions running around the UK this August
Bristol Archives: Empire through the Lens installation view

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham

With the recent repatriation of various stolen objects to their rightful owners - most notably from galleries around the world returning Benin Bronzes and the renewed discussion and refocused efforts to return the Parthenon Marbles to their rightful home in Athens- this exhibition at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre is particularly timely, taking a nuanced and critical look at the role of colonialism in the display of archaeological artefacts. In Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens, objects from the British Empire and Commonwealth Collection are presented alongside the cultural context of colonialist debates, as well as works by contemporary Birmingham artists, including three new sculptural works by Carla Busuttil, Faisal Hussain and Mahtab Hussain interrogating the role that colonialism has played - and indeed continues to play - in the portrayal of such objects, as well as the relationship between Britain and the rest of the world which such portrayal implies.

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens is showing at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham until 11th September 2022

Compost, Alexandra Toland, 2022

We are Compost/Composting the We at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow

Taking as a metaphorical jumping-off point the cyclical nature of composting, this exhibition at Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts features works by Alexandra Toland, Asad Raza and Désirée Coral, with each piece “separate but entangled” to create a display demonstrating the transformative - and transformable - power of knowledge and art. The exhibition begins with the first UK showing of Asad Raza’s Absorption, in which 60 tonnes of artificial neosoil is offered to visitors for their own domestic and community projects. With the soil created from recycled waste materials, Raza’s piece gives a literal interpretation of the exhibition’s title, and leads elegantly to the research installation Gaia Glossary, curated by Alexandra Toland and Lea Wittich. Here, the artists encourage the ‘recycling’ of knowledge, creating metaphorical compost in which new ideas can grow out of literature, resources, tools and objects. These ideas are finally put on display in the third exhibit, Désirée Coral’s Eating the Ancestors, in which the actions of past generations are investigated to further understand the present and develop ideas on the collective ‘WE’.

We are Compost/Composting the We is showing at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts until until 10th September 2022

Hat Trick, Sue Spaull

The Football Art Prize at Millennium Gallery, Sheffield

Still buzzing from the Lionesses recent victory at the Euros and looking for some art focused on the beautiful game? Look no further than this exhibition at Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery, displaying the work of 50 international artists who responded to the call for football-based artworks. Bringing together photography, film, painting and collage, The Football Art Prize isn’t just for dedicated fans of the sport; the works on display consider football not just as a shared cultural experience, but a bringing together of communities both national and international, from the heroes worshipped at the height of the Premier League right down to the grassroots work of local teams. The gallery promises that the works on display don’t just illustrate the worldwide love of football, but also “reflect the entirety of the human experience”. Plus, for any art and football-lovers who can’t make it to Sheffield, the exhibition will be touring to Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens in November.

The Football Art Prize is showing at Millennium Gallery until 30th October 2022

Jamaican Man in Profile (Henry Thomas), Glyn Philpot, 1934-5

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

Bringing together over 80 paintings, drawings and sculptures - some of which haven’t been on display to the public in decades - Flesh and Spirit at Chichester’s Pallant House Gallery serves as a retrospective on the work of sought-after portrait artist Glyn Philpot (1884-1937). Tracking Philpot’s development from Edwardian portraiture to his radically modern style in the 1930s, the show stands as the first major exhibition of the artist’s work in almost 40 years. It wasn’t just Philpot’s style that was radical however; while the subjects on display here include several famous figures including Loelia, Duchess of Westminster and Siegfried Sassoon, Philpot was also known for his portrayals of male lovers, religious subjects and unnamed black sitters. As such, central to the exhibition is a consideration of the artist’s pioneering work in the field of artistic representation and the wider discussions of identity which persist to this day in the art world.

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit is showing at Pallant House until 23rd October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
05/08/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this August
We give our recommendations for the best exhibitions running around the UK this August
Bristol Archives: Empire through the Lens installation view

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham

With the recent repatriation of various stolen objects to their rightful owners - most notably from galleries around the world returning Benin Bronzes and the renewed discussion and refocused efforts to return the Parthenon Marbles to their rightful home in Athens- this exhibition at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre is particularly timely, taking a nuanced and critical look at the role of colonialism in the display of archaeological artefacts. In Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens, objects from the British Empire and Commonwealth Collection are presented alongside the cultural context of colonialist debates, as well as works by contemporary Birmingham artists, including three new sculptural works by Carla Busuttil, Faisal Hussain and Mahtab Hussain interrogating the role that colonialism has played - and indeed continues to play - in the portrayal of such objects, as well as the relationship between Britain and the rest of the world which such portrayal implies.

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens is showing at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham until 11th September 2022

Compost, Alexandra Toland, 2022

We are Compost/Composting the We at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow

Taking as a metaphorical jumping-off point the cyclical nature of composting, this exhibition at Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts features works by Alexandra Toland, Asad Raza and Désirée Coral, with each piece “separate but entangled” to create a display demonstrating the transformative - and transformable - power of knowledge and art. The exhibition begins with the first UK showing of Asad Raza’s Absorption, in which 60 tonnes of artificial neosoil is offered to visitors for their own domestic and community projects. With the soil created from recycled waste materials, Raza’s piece gives a literal interpretation of the exhibition’s title, and leads elegantly to the research installation Gaia Glossary, curated by Alexandra Toland and Lea Wittich. Here, the artists encourage the ‘recycling’ of knowledge, creating metaphorical compost in which new ideas can grow out of literature, resources, tools and objects. These ideas are finally put on display in the third exhibit, Désirée Coral’s Eating the Ancestors, in which the actions of past generations are investigated to further understand the present and develop ideas on the collective ‘WE’.

We are Compost/Composting the We is showing at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts until until 10th September 2022

Hat Trick, Sue Spaull

The Football Art Prize at Millennium Gallery, Sheffield

Still buzzing from the Lionesses recent victory at the Euros and looking for some art focused on the beautiful game? Look no further than this exhibition at Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery, displaying the work of 50 international artists who responded to the call for football-based artworks. Bringing together photography, film, painting and collage, The Football Art Prize isn’t just for dedicated fans of the sport; the works on display consider football not just as a shared cultural experience, but a bringing together of communities both national and international, from the heroes worshipped at the height of the Premier League right down to the grassroots work of local teams. The gallery promises that the works on display don’t just illustrate the worldwide love of football, but also “reflect the entirety of the human experience”. Plus, for any art and football-lovers who can’t make it to Sheffield, the exhibition will be touring to Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens in November.

The Football Art Prize is showing at Millennium Gallery until 30th October 2022

Jamaican Man in Profile (Henry Thomas), Glyn Philpot, 1934-5

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

Bringing together over 80 paintings, drawings and sculptures - some of which haven’t been on display to the public in decades - Flesh and Spirit at Chichester’s Pallant House Gallery serves as a retrospective on the work of sought-after portrait artist Glyn Philpot (1884-1937). Tracking Philpot’s development from Edwardian portraiture to his radically modern style in the 1930s, the show stands as the first major exhibition of the artist’s work in almost 40 years. It wasn’t just Philpot’s style that was radical however; while the subjects on display here include several famous figures including Loelia, Duchess of Westminster and Siegfried Sassoon, Philpot was also known for his portrayals of male lovers, religious subjects and unnamed black sitters. As such, central to the exhibition is a consideration of the artist’s pioneering work in the field of artistic representation and the wider discussions of identity which persist to this day in the art world.

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit is showing at Pallant House until 23rd October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
05/08/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this August
We give our recommendations for the best exhibitions running around the UK this August
Bristol Archives: Empire through the Lens installation view

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham

With the recent repatriation of various stolen objects to their rightful owners - most notably from galleries around the world returning Benin Bronzes and the renewed discussion and refocused efforts to return the Parthenon Marbles to their rightful home in Athens- this exhibition at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre is particularly timely, taking a nuanced and critical look at the role of colonialism in the display of archaeological artefacts. In Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens, objects from the British Empire and Commonwealth Collection are presented alongside the cultural context of colonialist debates, as well as works by contemporary Birmingham artists, including three new sculptural works by Carla Busuttil, Faisal Hussain and Mahtab Hussain interrogating the role that colonialism has played - and indeed continues to play - in the portrayal of such objects, as well as the relationship between Britain and the rest of the world which such portrayal implies.

Bristol Archives: Empire Through the Lens is showing at Midlands Art Centre, Birmingham until 11th September 2022

Compost, Alexandra Toland, 2022

We are Compost/Composting the We at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow

Taking as a metaphorical jumping-off point the cyclical nature of composting, this exhibition at Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts features works by Alexandra Toland, Asad Raza and Désirée Coral, with each piece “separate but entangled” to create a display demonstrating the transformative - and transformable - power of knowledge and art. The exhibition begins with the first UK showing of Asad Raza’s Absorption, in which 60 tonnes of artificial neosoil is offered to visitors for their own domestic and community projects. With the soil created from recycled waste materials, Raza’s piece gives a literal interpretation of the exhibition’s title, and leads elegantly to the research installation Gaia Glossary, curated by Alexandra Toland and Lea Wittich. Here, the artists encourage the ‘recycling’ of knowledge, creating metaphorical compost in which new ideas can grow out of literature, resources, tools and objects. These ideas are finally put on display in the third exhibit, Désirée Coral’s Eating the Ancestors, in which the actions of past generations are investigated to further understand the present and develop ideas on the collective ‘WE’.

We are Compost/Composting the We is showing at CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts until until 10th September 2022

Hat Trick, Sue Spaull

The Football Art Prize at Millennium Gallery, Sheffield

Still buzzing from the Lionesses recent victory at the Euros and looking for some art focused on the beautiful game? Look no further than this exhibition at Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery, displaying the work of 50 international artists who responded to the call for football-based artworks. Bringing together photography, film, painting and collage, The Football Art Prize isn’t just for dedicated fans of the sport; the works on display consider football not just as a shared cultural experience, but a bringing together of communities both national and international, from the heroes worshipped at the height of the Premier League right down to the grassroots work of local teams. The gallery promises that the works on display don’t just illustrate the worldwide love of football, but also “reflect the entirety of the human experience”. Plus, for any art and football-lovers who can’t make it to Sheffield, the exhibition will be touring to Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens in November.

The Football Art Prize is showing at Millennium Gallery until 30th October 2022

Jamaican Man in Profile (Henry Thomas), Glyn Philpot, 1934-5

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

Bringing together over 80 paintings, drawings and sculptures - some of which haven’t been on display to the public in decades - Flesh and Spirit at Chichester’s Pallant House Gallery serves as a retrospective on the work of sought-after portrait artist Glyn Philpot (1884-1937). Tracking Philpot’s development from Edwardian portraiture to his radically modern style in the 1930s, the show stands as the first major exhibition of the artist’s work in almost 40 years. It wasn’t just Philpot’s style that was radical however; while the subjects on display here include several famous figures including Loelia, Duchess of Westminster and Siegfried Sassoon, Philpot was also known for his portrayals of male lovers, religious subjects and unnamed black sitters. As such, central to the exhibition is a consideration of the artist’s pioneering work in the field of artistic representation and the wider discussions of identity which persist to this day in the art world.

Glyn Philpot: Flesh and Spirit is showing at Pallant House until 23rd October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
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