06/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see outside of London this May
A take a look at some of the best exhibitions this month for art-lovers outside of London
Human Threads at Tramway (installation view)

Human Threads at Tramway

Curated by Edinburgh-based organisation Artlink and presented at Glasgow’s Tramway, Human Threads has been created following years of research into individuals with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD), and has been developed as a creative, accessible art project informed by individual personal experience. An interactive landscape featuring light, sound, touch and smell, each work in Human Threads offers a gentle encounter, featuring a sculpture which translates audio into vibrating pulses, a tower emitting smoke, light and bubbles and a large silk sail. This contributes to what Artlink describes as a “physical experience [which] becomes a shared, communal language through which to explore new possibilities of human perception”, an experience which encourages an expansion of artistic perception and invites a reconsideration of accessibility within the art world.

Human Threads is showing at Tramway from 11th May until 28th August 2022

Like The Moon, You rolled across my back, Tracey Emin, 2022 (monotype)

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death at Carl Freedman Gallery

Showing at Carl Freedman Gallery in her home town of Margate, Tracey Emin’s acclaimed exhibition A Journey To Death is a comprehensive solo exhibition of new prints, large-scale monotypes and bronze sculptures. The works themselves chronicle Emin’s experience with severe and life-threatening cancer, the invasive operation to treat it, and the subsequent trauma the procedure led to, and are presented across three rooms in the gallery. Characteristic of the work throughout her career, the exhibition is raw, honest and emotionally resonant, with Emin’s focus on her own physicality coming to the forefront in new ways, centred around her own autonomy in the face of her own body’s deterioration. With even the title addressing the artist’s near-death experience and the large-scale monotypes dominating the rooms they’re presented in, A Journey To Death marks Tracey Emin’s return to the art world stronger than ever.

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death is showing at Carl Freedman Gallery until 19th June 2022

Sharon Walters, Seeing Ourselves

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves at Midlands Art Centre

Speaking about her first solo exhibition Seeing Ourselves, showing now at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre, London-based artist Sharon Walters has stated her desire to present an “alternative narrative of empowerment” to the frequent ‘othering’ of black women in the art world. Made up of intricate paper cut pieces, Walters’ works seek to celebrate black women and reframe them from the dominant monolithic cultural view. The exhibition also features a large-scale sculptural self-portrait encased in a light box titled Beneath the Surface (2022), drawing on the racialisation of green spaces and growing confidence through representation, as well as photographic representation of Walters’ female friends, found images and newspaper clippings, giving the exhibition a crafted, handmade feel. Seeing Ourselves ultimately stands as a visual ode to taking up previously exclusionary spaces, as well as the agency that visibility in art can provide.

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves is showing at Midlands Art Centre until 26th June 2022

Cerne Abbas, Jeremy Deller, 2019

Radical Landscapes at Tate Liverpool

Demonstrating that landscape art can be more than simple green paintings of lush hillsides, Radical Landscapes seeks to represent the diversity of British landscapes and the communities that inhabit them. At the centre of the exhibition are two new commissions by Davinia-Ann Robinson and Delaine Le Bas; Robinson utilises sound and salvaged clay for a new installation Some Intimacy, while Le Bas draws on her English-Romany heritage to create Rinkeni Pani (Beautiful Water), a work inspired by concepts of climate change and trespass. Other works include Jeremy Deller’s neon take on the Cerne Giant, Cerne Abbas, Ruth Ewan’s Back to the Fields which brings live trees and plant life into the show, and Gustav Metzger’s Liquid Crystal Environment, a psychedelic installation utilising heat and light to mesmerising effect. Also present are over 150 paintings, sculptures, photographs and films by such artists as Derek Jarman, Claude Cahun, Ingrid Pollard and Tanoa Sasraku, coming together to present a new and exciting view of the British landscape across the breadth of the country.

Radical Landscapes is showing at Tate Liverpool until 4th September 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
06/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see outside of London this May
A take a look at some of the best exhibitions this month for art-lovers outside of London
Human Threads at Tramway (installation view)

Human Threads at Tramway

Curated by Edinburgh-based organisation Artlink and presented at Glasgow’s Tramway, Human Threads has been created following years of research into individuals with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD), and has been developed as a creative, accessible art project informed by individual personal experience. An interactive landscape featuring light, sound, touch and smell, each work in Human Threads offers a gentle encounter, featuring a sculpture which translates audio into vibrating pulses, a tower emitting smoke, light and bubbles and a large silk sail. This contributes to what Artlink describes as a “physical experience [which] becomes a shared, communal language through which to explore new possibilities of human perception”, an experience which encourages an expansion of artistic perception and invites a reconsideration of accessibility within the art world.

Human Threads is showing at Tramway from 11th May until 28th August 2022

Like The Moon, You rolled across my back, Tracey Emin, 2022 (monotype)

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death at Carl Freedman Gallery

Showing at Carl Freedman Gallery in her home town of Margate, Tracey Emin’s acclaimed exhibition A Journey To Death is a comprehensive solo exhibition of new prints, large-scale monotypes and bronze sculptures. The works themselves chronicle Emin’s experience with severe and life-threatening cancer, the invasive operation to treat it, and the subsequent trauma the procedure led to, and are presented across three rooms in the gallery. Characteristic of the work throughout her career, the exhibition is raw, honest and emotionally resonant, with Emin’s focus on her own physicality coming to the forefront in new ways, centred around her own autonomy in the face of her own body’s deterioration. With even the title addressing the artist’s near-death experience and the large-scale monotypes dominating the rooms they’re presented in, A Journey To Death marks Tracey Emin’s return to the art world stronger than ever.

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death is showing at Carl Freedman Gallery until 19th June 2022

Sharon Walters, Seeing Ourselves

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves at Midlands Art Centre

Speaking about her first solo exhibition Seeing Ourselves, showing now at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre, London-based artist Sharon Walters has stated her desire to present an “alternative narrative of empowerment” to the frequent ‘othering’ of black women in the art world. Made up of intricate paper cut pieces, Walters’ works seek to celebrate black women and reframe them from the dominant monolithic cultural view. The exhibition also features a large-scale sculptural self-portrait encased in a light box titled Beneath the Surface (2022), drawing on the racialisation of green spaces and growing confidence through representation, as well as photographic representation of Walters’ female friends, found images and newspaper clippings, giving the exhibition a crafted, handmade feel. Seeing Ourselves ultimately stands as a visual ode to taking up previously exclusionary spaces, as well as the agency that visibility in art can provide.

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves is showing at Midlands Art Centre until 26th June 2022

Cerne Abbas, Jeremy Deller, 2019

Radical Landscapes at Tate Liverpool

Demonstrating that landscape art can be more than simple green paintings of lush hillsides, Radical Landscapes seeks to represent the diversity of British landscapes and the communities that inhabit them. At the centre of the exhibition are two new commissions by Davinia-Ann Robinson and Delaine Le Bas; Robinson utilises sound and salvaged clay for a new installation Some Intimacy, while Le Bas draws on her English-Romany heritage to create Rinkeni Pani (Beautiful Water), a work inspired by concepts of climate change and trespass. Other works include Jeremy Deller’s neon take on the Cerne Giant, Cerne Abbas, Ruth Ewan’s Back to the Fields which brings live trees and plant life into the show, and Gustav Metzger’s Liquid Crystal Environment, a psychedelic installation utilising heat and light to mesmerising effect. Also present are over 150 paintings, sculptures, photographs and films by such artists as Derek Jarman, Claude Cahun, Ingrid Pollard and Tanoa Sasraku, coming together to present a new and exciting view of the British landscape across the breadth of the country.

Radical Landscapes is showing at Tate Liverpool until 4th September 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
06/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see outside of London this May
A take a look at some of the best exhibitions this month for art-lovers outside of London
Human Threads at Tramway (installation view)

Human Threads at Tramway

Curated by Edinburgh-based organisation Artlink and presented at Glasgow’s Tramway, Human Threads has been created following years of research into individuals with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD), and has been developed as a creative, accessible art project informed by individual personal experience. An interactive landscape featuring light, sound, touch and smell, each work in Human Threads offers a gentle encounter, featuring a sculpture which translates audio into vibrating pulses, a tower emitting smoke, light and bubbles and a large silk sail. This contributes to what Artlink describes as a “physical experience [which] becomes a shared, communal language through which to explore new possibilities of human perception”, an experience which encourages an expansion of artistic perception and invites a reconsideration of accessibility within the art world.

Human Threads is showing at Tramway from 11th May until 28th August 2022

Like The Moon, You rolled across my back, Tracey Emin, 2022 (monotype)

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death at Carl Freedman Gallery

Showing at Carl Freedman Gallery in her home town of Margate, Tracey Emin’s acclaimed exhibition A Journey To Death is a comprehensive solo exhibition of new prints, large-scale monotypes and bronze sculptures. The works themselves chronicle Emin’s experience with severe and life-threatening cancer, the invasive operation to treat it, and the subsequent trauma the procedure led to, and are presented across three rooms in the gallery. Characteristic of the work throughout her career, the exhibition is raw, honest and emotionally resonant, with Emin’s focus on her own physicality coming to the forefront in new ways, centred around her own autonomy in the face of her own body’s deterioration. With even the title addressing the artist’s near-death experience and the large-scale monotypes dominating the rooms they’re presented in, A Journey To Death marks Tracey Emin’s return to the art world stronger than ever.

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death is showing at Carl Freedman Gallery until 19th June 2022

Sharon Walters, Seeing Ourselves

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves at Midlands Art Centre

Speaking about her first solo exhibition Seeing Ourselves, showing now at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre, London-based artist Sharon Walters has stated her desire to present an “alternative narrative of empowerment” to the frequent ‘othering’ of black women in the art world. Made up of intricate paper cut pieces, Walters’ works seek to celebrate black women and reframe them from the dominant monolithic cultural view. The exhibition also features a large-scale sculptural self-portrait encased in a light box titled Beneath the Surface (2022), drawing on the racialisation of green spaces and growing confidence through representation, as well as photographic representation of Walters’ female friends, found images and newspaper clippings, giving the exhibition a crafted, handmade feel. Seeing Ourselves ultimately stands as a visual ode to taking up previously exclusionary spaces, as well as the agency that visibility in art can provide.

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves is showing at Midlands Art Centre until 26th June 2022

Cerne Abbas, Jeremy Deller, 2019

Radical Landscapes at Tate Liverpool

Demonstrating that landscape art can be more than simple green paintings of lush hillsides, Radical Landscapes seeks to represent the diversity of British landscapes and the communities that inhabit them. At the centre of the exhibition are two new commissions by Davinia-Ann Robinson and Delaine Le Bas; Robinson utilises sound and salvaged clay for a new installation Some Intimacy, while Le Bas draws on her English-Romany heritage to create Rinkeni Pani (Beautiful Water), a work inspired by concepts of climate change and trespass. Other works include Jeremy Deller’s neon take on the Cerne Giant, Cerne Abbas, Ruth Ewan’s Back to the Fields which brings live trees and plant life into the show, and Gustav Metzger’s Liquid Crystal Environment, a psychedelic installation utilising heat and light to mesmerising effect. Also present are over 150 paintings, sculptures, photographs and films by such artists as Derek Jarman, Claude Cahun, Ingrid Pollard and Tanoa Sasraku, coming together to present a new and exciting view of the British landscape across the breadth of the country.

Radical Landscapes is showing at Tate Liverpool until 4th September 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
06/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see outside of London this May
A take a look at some of the best exhibitions this month for art-lovers outside of London
Human Threads at Tramway (installation view)

Human Threads at Tramway

Curated by Edinburgh-based organisation Artlink and presented at Glasgow’s Tramway, Human Threads has been created following years of research into individuals with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD), and has been developed as a creative, accessible art project informed by individual personal experience. An interactive landscape featuring light, sound, touch and smell, each work in Human Threads offers a gentle encounter, featuring a sculpture which translates audio into vibrating pulses, a tower emitting smoke, light and bubbles and a large silk sail. This contributes to what Artlink describes as a “physical experience [which] becomes a shared, communal language through which to explore new possibilities of human perception”, an experience which encourages an expansion of artistic perception and invites a reconsideration of accessibility within the art world.

Human Threads is showing at Tramway from 11th May until 28th August 2022

Like The Moon, You rolled across my back, Tracey Emin, 2022 (monotype)

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death at Carl Freedman Gallery

Showing at Carl Freedman Gallery in her home town of Margate, Tracey Emin’s acclaimed exhibition A Journey To Death is a comprehensive solo exhibition of new prints, large-scale monotypes and bronze sculptures. The works themselves chronicle Emin’s experience with severe and life-threatening cancer, the invasive operation to treat it, and the subsequent trauma the procedure led to, and are presented across three rooms in the gallery. Characteristic of the work throughout her career, the exhibition is raw, honest and emotionally resonant, with Emin’s focus on her own physicality coming to the forefront in new ways, centred around her own autonomy in the face of her own body’s deterioration. With even the title addressing the artist’s near-death experience and the large-scale monotypes dominating the rooms they’re presented in, A Journey To Death marks Tracey Emin’s return to the art world stronger than ever.

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death is showing at Carl Freedman Gallery until 19th June 2022

Sharon Walters, Seeing Ourselves

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves at Midlands Art Centre

Speaking about her first solo exhibition Seeing Ourselves, showing now at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre, London-based artist Sharon Walters has stated her desire to present an “alternative narrative of empowerment” to the frequent ‘othering’ of black women in the art world. Made up of intricate paper cut pieces, Walters’ works seek to celebrate black women and reframe them from the dominant monolithic cultural view. The exhibition also features a large-scale sculptural self-portrait encased in a light box titled Beneath the Surface (2022), drawing on the racialisation of green spaces and growing confidence through representation, as well as photographic representation of Walters’ female friends, found images and newspaper clippings, giving the exhibition a crafted, handmade feel. Seeing Ourselves ultimately stands as a visual ode to taking up previously exclusionary spaces, as well as the agency that visibility in art can provide.

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves is showing at Midlands Art Centre until 26th June 2022

Cerne Abbas, Jeremy Deller, 2019

Radical Landscapes at Tate Liverpool

Demonstrating that landscape art can be more than simple green paintings of lush hillsides, Radical Landscapes seeks to represent the diversity of British landscapes and the communities that inhabit them. At the centre of the exhibition are two new commissions by Davinia-Ann Robinson and Delaine Le Bas; Robinson utilises sound and salvaged clay for a new installation Some Intimacy, while Le Bas draws on her English-Romany heritage to create Rinkeni Pani (Beautiful Water), a work inspired by concepts of climate change and trespass. Other works include Jeremy Deller’s neon take on the Cerne Giant, Cerne Abbas, Ruth Ewan’s Back to the Fields which brings live trees and plant life into the show, and Gustav Metzger’s Liquid Crystal Environment, a psychedelic installation utilising heat and light to mesmerising effect. Also present are over 150 paintings, sculptures, photographs and films by such artists as Derek Jarman, Claude Cahun, Ingrid Pollard and Tanoa Sasraku, coming together to present a new and exciting view of the British landscape across the breadth of the country.

Radical Landscapes is showing at Tate Liverpool until 4th September 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
06/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see outside of London this May
A take a look at some of the best exhibitions this month for art-lovers outside of London
Human Threads at Tramway (installation view)

Human Threads at Tramway

Curated by Edinburgh-based organisation Artlink and presented at Glasgow’s Tramway, Human Threads has been created following years of research into individuals with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD), and has been developed as a creative, accessible art project informed by individual personal experience. An interactive landscape featuring light, sound, touch and smell, each work in Human Threads offers a gentle encounter, featuring a sculpture which translates audio into vibrating pulses, a tower emitting smoke, light and bubbles and a large silk sail. This contributes to what Artlink describes as a “physical experience [which] becomes a shared, communal language through which to explore new possibilities of human perception”, an experience which encourages an expansion of artistic perception and invites a reconsideration of accessibility within the art world.

Human Threads is showing at Tramway from 11th May until 28th August 2022

Like The Moon, You rolled across my back, Tracey Emin, 2022 (monotype)

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death at Carl Freedman Gallery

Showing at Carl Freedman Gallery in her home town of Margate, Tracey Emin’s acclaimed exhibition A Journey To Death is a comprehensive solo exhibition of new prints, large-scale monotypes and bronze sculptures. The works themselves chronicle Emin’s experience with severe and life-threatening cancer, the invasive operation to treat it, and the subsequent trauma the procedure led to, and are presented across three rooms in the gallery. Characteristic of the work throughout her career, the exhibition is raw, honest and emotionally resonant, with Emin’s focus on her own physicality coming to the forefront in new ways, centred around her own autonomy in the face of her own body’s deterioration. With even the title addressing the artist’s near-death experience and the large-scale monotypes dominating the rooms they’re presented in, A Journey To Death marks Tracey Emin’s return to the art world stronger than ever.

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death is showing at Carl Freedman Gallery until 19th June 2022

Sharon Walters, Seeing Ourselves

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves at Midlands Art Centre

Speaking about her first solo exhibition Seeing Ourselves, showing now at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre, London-based artist Sharon Walters has stated her desire to present an “alternative narrative of empowerment” to the frequent ‘othering’ of black women in the art world. Made up of intricate paper cut pieces, Walters’ works seek to celebrate black women and reframe them from the dominant monolithic cultural view. The exhibition also features a large-scale sculptural self-portrait encased in a light box titled Beneath the Surface (2022), drawing on the racialisation of green spaces and growing confidence through representation, as well as photographic representation of Walters’ female friends, found images and newspaper clippings, giving the exhibition a crafted, handmade feel. Seeing Ourselves ultimately stands as a visual ode to taking up previously exclusionary spaces, as well as the agency that visibility in art can provide.

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves is showing at Midlands Art Centre until 26th June 2022

Cerne Abbas, Jeremy Deller, 2019

Radical Landscapes at Tate Liverpool

Demonstrating that landscape art can be more than simple green paintings of lush hillsides, Radical Landscapes seeks to represent the diversity of British landscapes and the communities that inhabit them. At the centre of the exhibition are two new commissions by Davinia-Ann Robinson and Delaine Le Bas; Robinson utilises sound and salvaged clay for a new installation Some Intimacy, while Le Bas draws on her English-Romany heritage to create Rinkeni Pani (Beautiful Water), a work inspired by concepts of climate change and trespass. Other works include Jeremy Deller’s neon take on the Cerne Giant, Cerne Abbas, Ruth Ewan’s Back to the Fields which brings live trees and plant life into the show, and Gustav Metzger’s Liquid Crystal Environment, a psychedelic installation utilising heat and light to mesmerising effect. Also present are over 150 paintings, sculptures, photographs and films by such artists as Derek Jarman, Claude Cahun, Ingrid Pollard and Tanoa Sasraku, coming together to present a new and exciting view of the British landscape across the breadth of the country.

Radical Landscapes is showing at Tate Liverpool until 4th September 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
06/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see outside of London this May
Human Threads at Tramway (installation view)

Human Threads at Tramway

Curated by Edinburgh-based organisation Artlink and presented at Glasgow’s Tramway, Human Threads has been created following years of research into individuals with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD), and has been developed as a creative, accessible art project informed by individual personal experience. An interactive landscape featuring light, sound, touch and smell, each work in Human Threads offers a gentle encounter, featuring a sculpture which translates audio into vibrating pulses, a tower emitting smoke, light and bubbles and a large silk sail. This contributes to what Artlink describes as a “physical experience [which] becomes a shared, communal language through which to explore new possibilities of human perception”, an experience which encourages an expansion of artistic perception and invites a reconsideration of accessibility within the art world.

Human Threads is showing at Tramway from 11th May until 28th August 2022

Like The Moon, You rolled across my back, Tracey Emin, 2022 (monotype)

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death at Carl Freedman Gallery

Showing at Carl Freedman Gallery in her home town of Margate, Tracey Emin’s acclaimed exhibition A Journey To Death is a comprehensive solo exhibition of new prints, large-scale monotypes and bronze sculptures. The works themselves chronicle Emin’s experience with severe and life-threatening cancer, the invasive operation to treat it, and the subsequent trauma the procedure led to, and are presented across three rooms in the gallery. Characteristic of the work throughout her career, the exhibition is raw, honest and emotionally resonant, with Emin’s focus on her own physicality coming to the forefront in new ways, centred around her own autonomy in the face of her own body’s deterioration. With even the title addressing the artist’s near-death experience and the large-scale monotypes dominating the rooms they’re presented in, A Journey To Death marks Tracey Emin’s return to the art world stronger than ever.

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death is showing at Carl Freedman Gallery until 19th June 2022

Sharon Walters, Seeing Ourselves

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves at Midlands Art Centre

Speaking about her first solo exhibition Seeing Ourselves, showing now at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre, London-based artist Sharon Walters has stated her desire to present an “alternative narrative of empowerment” to the frequent ‘othering’ of black women in the art world. Made up of intricate paper cut pieces, Walters’ works seek to celebrate black women and reframe them from the dominant monolithic cultural view. The exhibition also features a large-scale sculptural self-portrait encased in a light box titled Beneath the Surface (2022), drawing on the racialisation of green spaces and growing confidence through representation, as well as photographic representation of Walters’ female friends, found images and newspaper clippings, giving the exhibition a crafted, handmade feel. Seeing Ourselves ultimately stands as a visual ode to taking up previously exclusionary spaces, as well as the agency that visibility in art can provide.

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves is showing at Midlands Art Centre until 26th June 2022

Cerne Abbas, Jeremy Deller, 2019

Radical Landscapes at Tate Liverpool

Demonstrating that landscape art can be more than simple green paintings of lush hillsides, Radical Landscapes seeks to represent the diversity of British landscapes and the communities that inhabit them. At the centre of the exhibition are two new commissions by Davinia-Ann Robinson and Delaine Le Bas; Robinson utilises sound and salvaged clay for a new installation Some Intimacy, while Le Bas draws on her English-Romany heritage to create Rinkeni Pani (Beautiful Water), a work inspired by concepts of climate change and trespass. Other works include Jeremy Deller’s neon take on the Cerne Giant, Cerne Abbas, Ruth Ewan’s Back to the Fields which brings live trees and plant life into the show, and Gustav Metzger’s Liquid Crystal Environment, a psychedelic installation utilising heat and light to mesmerising effect. Also present are over 150 paintings, sculptures, photographs and films by such artists as Derek Jarman, Claude Cahun, Ingrid Pollard and Tanoa Sasraku, coming together to present a new and exciting view of the British landscape across the breadth of the country.

Radical Landscapes is showing at Tate Liverpool until 4th September 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
06/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see outside of London this May
A take a look at some of the best exhibitions this month for art-lovers outside of London
Human Threads at Tramway (installation view)

Human Threads at Tramway

Curated by Edinburgh-based organisation Artlink and presented at Glasgow’s Tramway, Human Threads has been created following years of research into individuals with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD), and has been developed as a creative, accessible art project informed by individual personal experience. An interactive landscape featuring light, sound, touch and smell, each work in Human Threads offers a gentle encounter, featuring a sculpture which translates audio into vibrating pulses, a tower emitting smoke, light and bubbles and a large silk sail. This contributes to what Artlink describes as a “physical experience [which] becomes a shared, communal language through which to explore new possibilities of human perception”, an experience which encourages an expansion of artistic perception and invites a reconsideration of accessibility within the art world.

Human Threads is showing at Tramway from 11th May until 28th August 2022

Like The Moon, You rolled across my back, Tracey Emin, 2022 (monotype)

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death at Carl Freedman Gallery

Showing at Carl Freedman Gallery in her home town of Margate, Tracey Emin’s acclaimed exhibition A Journey To Death is a comprehensive solo exhibition of new prints, large-scale monotypes and bronze sculptures. The works themselves chronicle Emin’s experience with severe and life-threatening cancer, the invasive operation to treat it, and the subsequent trauma the procedure led to, and are presented across three rooms in the gallery. Characteristic of the work throughout her career, the exhibition is raw, honest and emotionally resonant, with Emin’s focus on her own physicality coming to the forefront in new ways, centred around her own autonomy in the face of her own body’s deterioration. With even the title addressing the artist’s near-death experience and the large-scale monotypes dominating the rooms they’re presented in, A Journey To Death marks Tracey Emin’s return to the art world stronger than ever.

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death is showing at Carl Freedman Gallery until 19th June 2022

Sharon Walters, Seeing Ourselves

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves at Midlands Art Centre

Speaking about her first solo exhibition Seeing Ourselves, showing now at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre, London-based artist Sharon Walters has stated her desire to present an “alternative narrative of empowerment” to the frequent ‘othering’ of black women in the art world. Made up of intricate paper cut pieces, Walters’ works seek to celebrate black women and reframe them from the dominant monolithic cultural view. The exhibition also features a large-scale sculptural self-portrait encased in a light box titled Beneath the Surface (2022), drawing on the racialisation of green spaces and growing confidence through representation, as well as photographic representation of Walters’ female friends, found images and newspaper clippings, giving the exhibition a crafted, handmade feel. Seeing Ourselves ultimately stands as a visual ode to taking up previously exclusionary spaces, as well as the agency that visibility in art can provide.

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves is showing at Midlands Art Centre until 26th June 2022

Cerne Abbas, Jeremy Deller, 2019

Radical Landscapes at Tate Liverpool

Demonstrating that landscape art can be more than simple green paintings of lush hillsides, Radical Landscapes seeks to represent the diversity of British landscapes and the communities that inhabit them. At the centre of the exhibition are two new commissions by Davinia-Ann Robinson and Delaine Le Bas; Robinson utilises sound and salvaged clay for a new installation Some Intimacy, while Le Bas draws on her English-Romany heritage to create Rinkeni Pani (Beautiful Water), a work inspired by concepts of climate change and trespass. Other works include Jeremy Deller’s neon take on the Cerne Giant, Cerne Abbas, Ruth Ewan’s Back to the Fields which brings live trees and plant life into the show, and Gustav Metzger’s Liquid Crystal Environment, a psychedelic installation utilising heat and light to mesmerising effect. Also present are over 150 paintings, sculptures, photographs and films by such artists as Derek Jarman, Claude Cahun, Ingrid Pollard and Tanoa Sasraku, coming together to present a new and exciting view of the British landscape across the breadth of the country.

Radical Landscapes is showing at Tate Liverpool until 4th September 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
06/05/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see outside of London this May
A take a look at some of the best exhibitions this month for art-lovers outside of London
Human Threads at Tramway (installation view)

Human Threads at Tramway

Curated by Edinburgh-based organisation Artlink and presented at Glasgow’s Tramway, Human Threads has been created following years of research into individuals with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD), and has been developed as a creative, accessible art project informed by individual personal experience. An interactive landscape featuring light, sound, touch and smell, each work in Human Threads offers a gentle encounter, featuring a sculpture which translates audio into vibrating pulses, a tower emitting smoke, light and bubbles and a large silk sail. This contributes to what Artlink describes as a “physical experience [which] becomes a shared, communal language through which to explore new possibilities of human perception”, an experience which encourages an expansion of artistic perception and invites a reconsideration of accessibility within the art world.

Human Threads is showing at Tramway from 11th May until 28th August 2022

Like The Moon, You rolled across my back, Tracey Emin, 2022 (monotype)

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death at Carl Freedman Gallery

Showing at Carl Freedman Gallery in her home town of Margate, Tracey Emin’s acclaimed exhibition A Journey To Death is a comprehensive solo exhibition of new prints, large-scale monotypes and bronze sculptures. The works themselves chronicle Emin’s experience with severe and life-threatening cancer, the invasive operation to treat it, and the subsequent trauma the procedure led to, and are presented across three rooms in the gallery. Characteristic of the work throughout her career, the exhibition is raw, honest and emotionally resonant, with Emin’s focus on her own physicality coming to the forefront in new ways, centred around her own autonomy in the face of her own body’s deterioration. With even the title addressing the artist’s near-death experience and the large-scale monotypes dominating the rooms they’re presented in, A Journey To Death marks Tracey Emin’s return to the art world stronger than ever.

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death is showing at Carl Freedman Gallery until 19th June 2022

Sharon Walters, Seeing Ourselves

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves at Midlands Art Centre

Speaking about her first solo exhibition Seeing Ourselves, showing now at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre, London-based artist Sharon Walters has stated her desire to present an “alternative narrative of empowerment” to the frequent ‘othering’ of black women in the art world. Made up of intricate paper cut pieces, Walters’ works seek to celebrate black women and reframe them from the dominant monolithic cultural view. The exhibition also features a large-scale sculptural self-portrait encased in a light box titled Beneath the Surface (2022), drawing on the racialisation of green spaces and growing confidence through representation, as well as photographic representation of Walters’ female friends, found images and newspaper clippings, giving the exhibition a crafted, handmade feel. Seeing Ourselves ultimately stands as a visual ode to taking up previously exclusionary spaces, as well as the agency that visibility in art can provide.

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves is showing at Midlands Art Centre until 26th June 2022

Cerne Abbas, Jeremy Deller, 2019

Radical Landscapes at Tate Liverpool

Demonstrating that landscape art can be more than simple green paintings of lush hillsides, Radical Landscapes seeks to represent the diversity of British landscapes and the communities that inhabit them. At the centre of the exhibition are two new commissions by Davinia-Ann Robinson and Delaine Le Bas; Robinson utilises sound and salvaged clay for a new installation Some Intimacy, while Le Bas draws on her English-Romany heritage to create Rinkeni Pani (Beautiful Water), a work inspired by concepts of climate change and trespass. Other works include Jeremy Deller’s neon take on the Cerne Giant, Cerne Abbas, Ruth Ewan’s Back to the Fields which brings live trees and plant life into the show, and Gustav Metzger’s Liquid Crystal Environment, a psychedelic installation utilising heat and light to mesmerising effect. Also present are over 150 paintings, sculptures, photographs and films by such artists as Derek Jarman, Claude Cahun, Ingrid Pollard and Tanoa Sasraku, coming together to present a new and exciting view of the British landscape across the breadth of the country.

Radical Landscapes is showing at Tate Liverpool until 4th September 2022

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06/05/2022
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Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see outside of London this May
A take a look at some of the best exhibitions this month for art-lovers outside of London
Human Threads at Tramway (installation view)

Human Threads at Tramway

Curated by Edinburgh-based organisation Artlink and presented at Glasgow’s Tramway, Human Threads has been created following years of research into individuals with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD), and has been developed as a creative, accessible art project informed by individual personal experience. An interactive landscape featuring light, sound, touch and smell, each work in Human Threads offers a gentle encounter, featuring a sculpture which translates audio into vibrating pulses, a tower emitting smoke, light and bubbles and a large silk sail. This contributes to what Artlink describes as a “physical experience [which] becomes a shared, communal language through which to explore new possibilities of human perception”, an experience which encourages an expansion of artistic perception and invites a reconsideration of accessibility within the art world.

Human Threads is showing at Tramway from 11th May until 28th August 2022

Like The Moon, You rolled across my back, Tracey Emin, 2022 (monotype)

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death at Carl Freedman Gallery

Showing at Carl Freedman Gallery in her home town of Margate, Tracey Emin’s acclaimed exhibition A Journey To Death is a comprehensive solo exhibition of new prints, large-scale monotypes and bronze sculptures. The works themselves chronicle Emin’s experience with severe and life-threatening cancer, the invasive operation to treat it, and the subsequent trauma the procedure led to, and are presented across three rooms in the gallery. Characteristic of the work throughout her career, the exhibition is raw, honest and emotionally resonant, with Emin’s focus on her own physicality coming to the forefront in new ways, centred around her own autonomy in the face of her own body’s deterioration. With even the title addressing the artist’s near-death experience and the large-scale monotypes dominating the rooms they’re presented in, A Journey To Death marks Tracey Emin’s return to the art world stronger than ever.

Tracey Emin: A Journey To Death is showing at Carl Freedman Gallery until 19th June 2022

Sharon Walters, Seeing Ourselves

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves at Midlands Art Centre

Speaking about her first solo exhibition Seeing Ourselves, showing now at Birmingham’s Midlands Art Centre, London-based artist Sharon Walters has stated her desire to present an “alternative narrative of empowerment” to the frequent ‘othering’ of black women in the art world. Made up of intricate paper cut pieces, Walters’ works seek to celebrate black women and reframe them from the dominant monolithic cultural view. The exhibition also features a large-scale sculptural self-portrait encased in a light box titled Beneath the Surface (2022), drawing on the racialisation of green spaces and growing confidence through representation, as well as photographic representation of Walters’ female friends, found images and newspaper clippings, giving the exhibition a crafted, handmade feel. Seeing Ourselves ultimately stands as a visual ode to taking up previously exclusionary spaces, as well as the agency that visibility in art can provide.

Sharon Walters: Seeing Ourselves is showing at Midlands Art Centre until 26th June 2022

Cerne Abbas, Jeremy Deller, 2019

Radical Landscapes at Tate Liverpool

Demonstrating that landscape art can be more than simple green paintings of lush hillsides, Radical Landscapes seeks to represent the diversity of British landscapes and the communities that inhabit them. At the centre of the exhibition are two new commissions by Davinia-Ann Robinson and Delaine Le Bas; Robinson utilises sound and salvaged clay for a new installation Some Intimacy, while Le Bas draws on her English-Romany heritage to create Rinkeni Pani (Beautiful Water), a work inspired by concepts of climate change and trespass. Other works include Jeremy Deller’s neon take on the Cerne Giant, Cerne Abbas, Ruth Ewan’s Back to the Fields which brings live trees and plant life into the show, and Gustav Metzger’s Liquid Crystal Environment, a psychedelic installation utilising heat and light to mesmerising effect. Also present are over 150 paintings, sculptures, photographs and films by such artists as Derek Jarman, Claude Cahun, Ingrid Pollard and Tanoa Sasraku, coming together to present a new and exciting view of the British landscape across the breadth of the country.

Radical Landscapes is showing at Tate Liverpool until 4th September 2022

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