16/09/2021
Reviews
Beatriz Pizarro Aparicio
Houseago | Rodin at Gagosian
A twin exhibition of sculptors Houseago & Rodin, on show at Gagosian Davies St.

No artist has ever made it entirely on their own: credited or denied, conscious or marauding in the subconscious, an artistic predecessor’s influence is never far away. From Cecily Brown and her Old Masters to Picasso and Cézanne; everyone has had a muse, a guide, an ancestor pulling back the curtain of inspiration.

So it is a welcome sight to see Houseago being brought into the mix of artists who tip their hat to the old in this hidden gem of an exhibition at Gagosian Davies St.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

The space is relatively modest, with its main room bathed white in natural light and displaying Houseago’s Gold Walking Man (2021), a behemoth that belies an industrial presence despite its gold patina, surrounded by three of Rodin’s curvilinear sculptures on loan from the Rodin Musée in Paris. Appended to the main room, in a close, darkened space we find ourselves face to face with some smaller pieces, Hauseagos and Rodins intermingled across the space as if at their own vernissage.

An interesting conversation between the two sculptors emerges – most evidently at first is Houseago with his chiselled and hammered bodies and faces, which contrasts harmoniously with Rodin’s elegant, muscled forms. But as the conversation is sustained, much like the sustained note of a piano that elongates and continues if left unchecked, a deeper meaning begins to appear.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

Both focus on the human body and its multiple forms of dynamism, however, Houseago’s working of his materials evokes a very human truth that stands in stark contrast to Rodin’s relatively polished finish. It’s as if Houseago wanted to show us that, much like in the process of hewing out his sculptures from the raw material, showing us each blow, twist, and scar on the surface, the process of living through to our death is very much the same. After all, where is pleasure without pain?

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

It’s worth noting that this is the second collaboration between Gagosian and Musée Rodin – the first being in 2011 for their Rodin-Sugimoto exhibition in Paris – and it is exciting to see an increasing number of such collaborations appearing in the commercial sector of the art world.

During a period where, globally, artists and museums are struggling to stay afloat, it is immensely encouraging to see the three entities in the sector coming together in collaboration and co-creation. Long may this continue.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

This exhibition also comes hot on the heels of Tate Modern’s current exhibition The Making of Rodin (on until November 21st), and it gives a unique opportunity to see Rodin’s bronzes up and close without the crowds.

Houseago-Rodin is on at Gagosian Davies Street, London, until December 18th. Entry is free of charge.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
16/09/2021
Reviews
Beatriz Pizarro Aparicio
Houseago | Rodin at Gagosian
A twin exhibition of sculptors Houseago & Rodin, on show at Gagosian Davies St.

No artist has ever made it entirely on their own: credited or denied, conscious or marauding in the subconscious, an artistic predecessor’s influence is never far away. From Cecily Brown and her Old Masters to Picasso and Cézanne; everyone has had a muse, a guide, an ancestor pulling back the curtain of inspiration.

So it is a welcome sight to see Houseago being brought into the mix of artists who tip their hat to the old in this hidden gem of an exhibition at Gagosian Davies St.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

The space is relatively modest, with its main room bathed white in natural light and displaying Houseago’s Gold Walking Man (2021), a behemoth that belies an industrial presence despite its gold patina, surrounded by three of Rodin’s curvilinear sculptures on loan from the Rodin Musée in Paris. Appended to the main room, in a close, darkened space we find ourselves face to face with some smaller pieces, Hauseagos and Rodins intermingled across the space as if at their own vernissage.

An interesting conversation between the two sculptors emerges – most evidently at first is Houseago with his chiselled and hammered bodies and faces, which contrasts harmoniously with Rodin’s elegant, muscled forms. But as the conversation is sustained, much like the sustained note of a piano that elongates and continues if left unchecked, a deeper meaning begins to appear.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

Both focus on the human body and its multiple forms of dynamism, however, Houseago’s working of his materials evokes a very human truth that stands in stark contrast to Rodin’s relatively polished finish. It’s as if Houseago wanted to show us that, much like in the process of hewing out his sculptures from the raw material, showing us each blow, twist, and scar on the surface, the process of living through to our death is very much the same. After all, where is pleasure without pain?

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

It’s worth noting that this is the second collaboration between Gagosian and Musée Rodin – the first being in 2011 for their Rodin-Sugimoto exhibition in Paris – and it is exciting to see an increasing number of such collaborations appearing in the commercial sector of the art world.

During a period where, globally, artists and museums are struggling to stay afloat, it is immensely encouraging to see the three entities in the sector coming together in collaboration and co-creation. Long may this continue.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

This exhibition also comes hot on the heels of Tate Modern’s current exhibition The Making of Rodin (on until November 21st), and it gives a unique opportunity to see Rodin’s bronzes up and close without the crowds.

Houseago-Rodin is on at Gagosian Davies Street, London, until December 18th. Entry is free of charge.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
16/09/2021
Reviews
Beatriz Pizarro Aparicio
Houseago | Rodin at Gagosian
A twin exhibition of sculptors Houseago & Rodin, on show at Gagosian Davies St.

No artist has ever made it entirely on their own: credited or denied, conscious or marauding in the subconscious, an artistic predecessor’s influence is never far away. From Cecily Brown and her Old Masters to Picasso and Cézanne; everyone has had a muse, a guide, an ancestor pulling back the curtain of inspiration.

So it is a welcome sight to see Houseago being brought into the mix of artists who tip their hat to the old in this hidden gem of an exhibition at Gagosian Davies St.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

The space is relatively modest, with its main room bathed white in natural light and displaying Houseago’s Gold Walking Man (2021), a behemoth that belies an industrial presence despite its gold patina, surrounded by three of Rodin’s curvilinear sculptures on loan from the Rodin Musée in Paris. Appended to the main room, in a close, darkened space we find ourselves face to face with some smaller pieces, Hauseagos and Rodins intermingled across the space as if at their own vernissage.

An interesting conversation between the two sculptors emerges – most evidently at first is Houseago with his chiselled and hammered bodies and faces, which contrasts harmoniously with Rodin’s elegant, muscled forms. But as the conversation is sustained, much like the sustained note of a piano that elongates and continues if left unchecked, a deeper meaning begins to appear.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

Both focus on the human body and its multiple forms of dynamism, however, Houseago’s working of his materials evokes a very human truth that stands in stark contrast to Rodin’s relatively polished finish. It’s as if Houseago wanted to show us that, much like in the process of hewing out his sculptures from the raw material, showing us each blow, twist, and scar on the surface, the process of living through to our death is very much the same. After all, where is pleasure without pain?

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

It’s worth noting that this is the second collaboration between Gagosian and Musée Rodin – the first being in 2011 for their Rodin-Sugimoto exhibition in Paris – and it is exciting to see an increasing number of such collaborations appearing in the commercial sector of the art world.

During a period where, globally, artists and museums are struggling to stay afloat, it is immensely encouraging to see the three entities in the sector coming together in collaboration and co-creation. Long may this continue.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

This exhibition also comes hot on the heels of Tate Modern’s current exhibition The Making of Rodin (on until November 21st), and it gives a unique opportunity to see Rodin’s bronzes up and close without the crowds.

Houseago-Rodin is on at Gagosian Davies Street, London, until December 18th. Entry is free of charge.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
16/09/2021
Reviews
Beatriz Pizarro Aparicio
Houseago | Rodin at Gagosian
A twin exhibition of sculptors Houseago & Rodin, on show at Gagosian Davies St.

No artist has ever made it entirely on their own: credited or denied, conscious or marauding in the subconscious, an artistic predecessor’s influence is never far away. From Cecily Brown and her Old Masters to Picasso and Cézanne; everyone has had a muse, a guide, an ancestor pulling back the curtain of inspiration.

So it is a welcome sight to see Houseago being brought into the mix of artists who tip their hat to the old in this hidden gem of an exhibition at Gagosian Davies St.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

The space is relatively modest, with its main room bathed white in natural light and displaying Houseago’s Gold Walking Man (2021), a behemoth that belies an industrial presence despite its gold patina, surrounded by three of Rodin’s curvilinear sculptures on loan from the Rodin Musée in Paris. Appended to the main room, in a close, darkened space we find ourselves face to face with some smaller pieces, Hauseagos and Rodins intermingled across the space as if at their own vernissage.

An interesting conversation between the two sculptors emerges – most evidently at first is Houseago with his chiselled and hammered bodies and faces, which contrasts harmoniously with Rodin’s elegant, muscled forms. But as the conversation is sustained, much like the sustained note of a piano that elongates and continues if left unchecked, a deeper meaning begins to appear.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

Both focus on the human body and its multiple forms of dynamism, however, Houseago’s working of his materials evokes a very human truth that stands in stark contrast to Rodin’s relatively polished finish. It’s as if Houseago wanted to show us that, much like in the process of hewing out his sculptures from the raw material, showing us each blow, twist, and scar on the surface, the process of living through to our death is very much the same. After all, where is pleasure without pain?

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

It’s worth noting that this is the second collaboration between Gagosian and Musée Rodin – the first being in 2011 for their Rodin-Sugimoto exhibition in Paris – and it is exciting to see an increasing number of such collaborations appearing in the commercial sector of the art world.

During a period where, globally, artists and museums are struggling to stay afloat, it is immensely encouraging to see the three entities in the sector coming together in collaboration and co-creation. Long may this continue.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

This exhibition also comes hot on the heels of Tate Modern’s current exhibition The Making of Rodin (on until November 21st), and it gives a unique opportunity to see Rodin’s bronzes up and close without the crowds.

Houseago-Rodin is on at Gagosian Davies Street, London, until December 18th. Entry is free of charge.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
16/09/2021
Reviews
Beatriz Pizarro Aparicio
Houseago | Rodin at Gagosian
A twin exhibition of sculptors Houseago & Rodin, on show at Gagosian Davies St.

No artist has ever made it entirely on their own: credited or denied, conscious or marauding in the subconscious, an artistic predecessor’s influence is never far away. From Cecily Brown and her Old Masters to Picasso and Cézanne; everyone has had a muse, a guide, an ancestor pulling back the curtain of inspiration.

So it is a welcome sight to see Houseago being brought into the mix of artists who tip their hat to the old in this hidden gem of an exhibition at Gagosian Davies St.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

The space is relatively modest, with its main room bathed white in natural light and displaying Houseago’s Gold Walking Man (2021), a behemoth that belies an industrial presence despite its gold patina, surrounded by three of Rodin’s curvilinear sculptures on loan from the Rodin Musée in Paris. Appended to the main room, in a close, darkened space we find ourselves face to face with some smaller pieces, Hauseagos and Rodins intermingled across the space as if at their own vernissage.

An interesting conversation between the two sculptors emerges – most evidently at first is Houseago with his chiselled and hammered bodies and faces, which contrasts harmoniously with Rodin’s elegant, muscled forms. But as the conversation is sustained, much like the sustained note of a piano that elongates and continues if left unchecked, a deeper meaning begins to appear.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

Both focus on the human body and its multiple forms of dynamism, however, Houseago’s working of his materials evokes a very human truth that stands in stark contrast to Rodin’s relatively polished finish. It’s as if Houseago wanted to show us that, much like in the process of hewing out his sculptures from the raw material, showing us each blow, twist, and scar on the surface, the process of living through to our death is very much the same. After all, where is pleasure without pain?

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

It’s worth noting that this is the second collaboration between Gagosian and Musée Rodin – the first being in 2011 for their Rodin-Sugimoto exhibition in Paris – and it is exciting to see an increasing number of such collaborations appearing in the commercial sector of the art world.

During a period where, globally, artists and museums are struggling to stay afloat, it is immensely encouraging to see the three entities in the sector coming together in collaboration and co-creation. Long may this continue.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

This exhibition also comes hot on the heels of Tate Modern’s current exhibition The Making of Rodin (on until November 21st), and it gives a unique opportunity to see Rodin’s bronzes up and close without the crowds.

Houseago-Rodin is on at Gagosian Davies Street, London, until December 18th. Entry is free of charge.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
16/09/2021
Reviews
Beatriz Pizarro Aparicio
Houseago | Rodin at Gagosian

No artist has ever made it entirely on their own: credited or denied, conscious or marauding in the subconscious, an artistic predecessor’s influence is never far away. From Cecily Brown and her Old Masters to Picasso and Cézanne; everyone has had a muse, a guide, an ancestor pulling back the curtain of inspiration.

So it is a welcome sight to see Houseago being brought into the mix of artists who tip their hat to the old in this hidden gem of an exhibition at Gagosian Davies St.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

The space is relatively modest, with its main room bathed white in natural light and displaying Houseago’s Gold Walking Man (2021), a behemoth that belies an industrial presence despite its gold patina, surrounded by three of Rodin’s curvilinear sculptures on loan from the Rodin Musée in Paris. Appended to the main room, in a close, darkened space we find ourselves face to face with some smaller pieces, Hauseagos and Rodins intermingled across the space as if at their own vernissage.

An interesting conversation between the two sculptors emerges – most evidently at first is Houseago with his chiselled and hammered bodies and faces, which contrasts harmoniously with Rodin’s elegant, muscled forms. But as the conversation is sustained, much like the sustained note of a piano that elongates and continues if left unchecked, a deeper meaning begins to appear.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

Both focus on the human body and its multiple forms of dynamism, however, Houseago’s working of his materials evokes a very human truth that stands in stark contrast to Rodin’s relatively polished finish. It’s as if Houseago wanted to show us that, much like in the process of hewing out his sculptures from the raw material, showing us each blow, twist, and scar on the surface, the process of living through to our death is very much the same. After all, where is pleasure without pain?

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

It’s worth noting that this is the second collaboration between Gagosian and Musée Rodin – the first being in 2011 for their Rodin-Sugimoto exhibition in Paris – and it is exciting to see an increasing number of such collaborations appearing in the commercial sector of the art world.

During a period where, globally, artists and museums are struggling to stay afloat, it is immensely encouraging to see the three entities in the sector coming together in collaboration and co-creation. Long may this continue.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

This exhibition also comes hot on the heels of Tate Modern’s current exhibition The Making of Rodin (on until November 21st), and it gives a unique opportunity to see Rodin’s bronzes up and close without the crowds.

Houseago-Rodin is on at Gagosian Davies Street, London, until December 18th. Entry is free of charge.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
16/09/2021
Reviews
Beatriz Pizarro Aparicio
Houseago | Rodin at Gagosian
A twin exhibition of sculptors Houseago & Rodin, on show at Gagosian Davies St.

No artist has ever made it entirely on their own: credited or denied, conscious or marauding in the subconscious, an artistic predecessor’s influence is never far away. From Cecily Brown and her Old Masters to Picasso and Cézanne; everyone has had a muse, a guide, an ancestor pulling back the curtain of inspiration.

So it is a welcome sight to see Houseago being brought into the mix of artists who tip their hat to the old in this hidden gem of an exhibition at Gagosian Davies St.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

The space is relatively modest, with its main room bathed white in natural light and displaying Houseago’s Gold Walking Man (2021), a behemoth that belies an industrial presence despite its gold patina, surrounded by three of Rodin’s curvilinear sculptures on loan from the Rodin Musée in Paris. Appended to the main room, in a close, darkened space we find ourselves face to face with some smaller pieces, Hauseagos and Rodins intermingled across the space as if at their own vernissage.

An interesting conversation between the two sculptors emerges – most evidently at first is Houseago with his chiselled and hammered bodies and faces, which contrasts harmoniously with Rodin’s elegant, muscled forms. But as the conversation is sustained, much like the sustained note of a piano that elongates and continues if left unchecked, a deeper meaning begins to appear.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

Both focus on the human body and its multiple forms of dynamism, however, Houseago’s working of his materials evokes a very human truth that stands in stark contrast to Rodin’s relatively polished finish. It’s as if Houseago wanted to show us that, much like in the process of hewing out his sculptures from the raw material, showing us each blow, twist, and scar on the surface, the process of living through to our death is very much the same. After all, where is pleasure without pain?

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

It’s worth noting that this is the second collaboration between Gagosian and Musée Rodin – the first being in 2011 for their Rodin-Sugimoto exhibition in Paris – and it is exciting to see an increasing number of such collaborations appearing in the commercial sector of the art world.

During a period where, globally, artists and museums are struggling to stay afloat, it is immensely encouraging to see the three entities in the sector coming together in collaboration and co-creation. Long may this continue.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

This exhibition also comes hot on the heels of Tate Modern’s current exhibition The Making of Rodin (on until November 21st), and it gives a unique opportunity to see Rodin’s bronzes up and close without the crowds.

Houseago-Rodin is on at Gagosian Davies Street, London, until December 18th. Entry is free of charge.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
16/09/2021
Reviews
Beatriz Pizarro Aparicio
Houseago | Rodin at Gagosian
A twin exhibition of sculptors Houseago & Rodin, on show at Gagosian Davies St.

No artist has ever made it entirely on their own: credited or denied, conscious or marauding in the subconscious, an artistic predecessor’s influence is never far away. From Cecily Brown and her Old Masters to Picasso and Cézanne; everyone has had a muse, a guide, an ancestor pulling back the curtain of inspiration.

So it is a welcome sight to see Houseago being brought into the mix of artists who tip their hat to the old in this hidden gem of an exhibition at Gagosian Davies St.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

The space is relatively modest, with its main room bathed white in natural light and displaying Houseago’s Gold Walking Man (2021), a behemoth that belies an industrial presence despite its gold patina, surrounded by three of Rodin’s curvilinear sculptures on loan from the Rodin Musée in Paris. Appended to the main room, in a close, darkened space we find ourselves face to face with some smaller pieces, Hauseagos and Rodins intermingled across the space as if at their own vernissage.

An interesting conversation between the two sculptors emerges – most evidently at first is Houseago with his chiselled and hammered bodies and faces, which contrasts harmoniously with Rodin’s elegant, muscled forms. But as the conversation is sustained, much like the sustained note of a piano that elongates and continues if left unchecked, a deeper meaning begins to appear.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

Both focus on the human body and its multiple forms of dynamism, however, Houseago’s working of his materials evokes a very human truth that stands in stark contrast to Rodin’s relatively polished finish. It’s as if Houseago wanted to show us that, much like in the process of hewing out his sculptures from the raw material, showing us each blow, twist, and scar on the surface, the process of living through to our death is very much the same. After all, where is pleasure without pain?

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

It’s worth noting that this is the second collaboration between Gagosian and Musée Rodin – the first being in 2011 for their Rodin-Sugimoto exhibition in Paris – and it is exciting to see an increasing number of such collaborations appearing in the commercial sector of the art world.

During a period where, globally, artists and museums are struggling to stay afloat, it is immensely encouraging to see the three entities in the sector coming together in collaboration and co-creation. Long may this continue.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

This exhibition also comes hot on the heels of Tate Modern’s current exhibition The Making of Rodin (on until November 21st), and it gives a unique opportunity to see Rodin’s bronzes up and close without the crowds.

Houseago-Rodin is on at Gagosian Davies Street, London, until December 18th. Entry is free of charge.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
16/09/2021
Reviews
Beatriz Pizarro Aparicio
Houseago | Rodin at Gagosian
A twin exhibition of sculptors Houseago & Rodin, on show at Gagosian Davies St.

No artist has ever made it entirely on their own: credited or denied, conscious or marauding in the subconscious, an artistic predecessor’s influence is never far away. From Cecily Brown and her Old Masters to Picasso and Cézanne; everyone has had a muse, a guide, an ancestor pulling back the curtain of inspiration.

So it is a welcome sight to see Houseago being brought into the mix of artists who tip their hat to the old in this hidden gem of an exhibition at Gagosian Davies St.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

The space is relatively modest, with its main room bathed white in natural light and displaying Houseago’s Gold Walking Man (2021), a behemoth that belies an industrial presence despite its gold patina, surrounded by three of Rodin’s curvilinear sculptures on loan from the Rodin Musée in Paris. Appended to the main room, in a close, darkened space we find ourselves face to face with some smaller pieces, Hauseagos and Rodins intermingled across the space as if at their own vernissage.

An interesting conversation between the two sculptors emerges – most evidently at first is Houseago with his chiselled and hammered bodies and faces, which contrasts harmoniously with Rodin’s elegant, muscled forms. But as the conversation is sustained, much like the sustained note of a piano that elongates and continues if left unchecked, a deeper meaning begins to appear.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

Both focus on the human body and its multiple forms of dynamism, however, Houseago’s working of his materials evokes a very human truth that stands in stark contrast to Rodin’s relatively polished finish. It’s as if Houseago wanted to show us that, much like in the process of hewing out his sculptures from the raw material, showing us each blow, twist, and scar on the surface, the process of living through to our death is very much the same. After all, where is pleasure without pain?

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

It’s worth noting that this is the second collaboration between Gagosian and Musée Rodin – the first being in 2011 for their Rodin-Sugimoto exhibition in Paris – and it is exciting to see an increasing number of such collaborations appearing in the commercial sector of the art world.

During a period where, globally, artists and museums are struggling to stay afloat, it is immensely encouraging to see the three entities in the sector coming together in collaboration and co-creation. Long may this continue.

Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins
Installation view, photo by Lucy Dawkins

This exhibition also comes hot on the heels of Tate Modern’s current exhibition The Making of Rodin (on until November 21st), and it gives a unique opportunity to see Rodin’s bronzes up and close without the crowds.

Houseago-Rodin is on at Gagosian Davies Street, London, until December 18th. Entry is free of charge.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
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