07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this June
We spotlight some of the best exhibitions running in the UK this month

I Made This For You, Thomas Albdorf, 2017

Thomas Albdorf at Belfast Exposed Photography

Straddling the line between photography and sculpture, the work of Vienna-based conceptual artist Thomas Albdorf deliberately disorientates viewers, reframing and recontextualising familiar images until they’re rendered unintelligible. The majority of Albdorf’s work takes place not in the production or composition of his photographs, but in their post-production, a process which allows greater imaginative potential; after creating his images, he often submits them to online image recognition software in order to test whether his creations can trick them into thinking they are ‘real’. The combination of digital and analogue technologies conceptually echoes the history of the medium itself, arguably evolved further with the introduction of post-production, allowing the apparently infinite altering of an image to the point of decontextualisation, echoing the ephemeral, shifting perceptions of the modern world online. The three bodies of work on display at Belfast Exposed Photography demonstrate these sensibilities of Thomas Albdorf’s work, and form part of the Belfast Photo Festival 2022.

Thomas Albdorf is showing at Belfast Exposed Photography until 16th July

Glasgow Tenements, James Morrison, 1960

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 at The Scottish Gallery

Two years after his death in 2020, The Scottish Gallery hosts a major retrospective dedicated to beloved Scottish artist James Morrison, taking over both floors of the gallery and spanning Morrison’s seven decade-long career. One of the most distinctive and instantly recognisable Scottish artists of the last fifty years, Morrison’s instantly recognisable technique is credited with helping to reinvigorate landscape painting in Scotland. The displaying of the exhibition at The Scottish Gallery is fitting given its historic association with James Morrison since 1959, which ultimately allowed the artist to retire from his job teaching at Dundee’s Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art to focus on painting full-time in 1987. The pieces being shown display the variety of Scottish landscapes throughout the seasons as focalised through the distinctive eye of Morrison and, with over 100 works from across his career, this exhibition serves as a comprehensive retrospective of a much-loved national artist.

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 is showing at The Scottish Gallery until 25th June

LOVE (Red Blue Green), Robert Indiana, 1966-1998

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2018 at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

This exhibition may have been running since March, but with the weather picking up, there’s no better time to appreciate this large-scale outdoor retrospective of Robert Indiana’s work at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Covering six decades of the sculptor's work, the collection is perhaps best embodied by his iconic piece LOVE (Red Blue Green) (1966-1998), a colossal piece which greets visitors at the park’s entrance; with its message of universal tolerance and acceptance, pieces such as this remain relevant in contemporary struggles against racism and discrimination to LGBTQIA+ communities. While traditionally displayed in urban spaces, the presence of LOVE in the Yorkshire countryside is striking, and serves as a fitting introduction of the rest of the work on display; Mississippi (1965), for instance, was conceived as a contemporary response to the violence which met the civil rights protests in the 50s and 60s, Ash (1985) references the queer community’s response to the AIDS crisis, and Love Rising (The Black and White Love) (1968) was created following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. With pieces such as these displayed alongside exciting contemporary sculptures by Damien Hirst and Jordan McKenzie, summer is undoubtedly the best time to visit the park.

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2020 is showing at Yorkshire Sculpture Park until 8th January 2023

Three Thousand Species of Fungi in the New Forest, Kurt Jackson, 2019

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity at Southampton City Art Gallery

Continuing a series of exhibitions exploring the climate crisis and environmental concerns, Biodiversity features sculptures, paintings and found objects by Kurt Jackson. The pieces themselves were created in locations around the UK including such natural areas as the south coast and the New Forest. While, as the title of the exhibition would suggest, Jackson’s pieces often spotlight diversity of flora and fauna found throughout the country, perhaps even more of a focus is the interdependence of various creatures and plants within the landscape, and the myriad ways in which human intervention is disrupting this natural order. As such, the show stands as a call for action and acknowledgement of humanity’s responsibility in the face of potential catastrophe.

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity is showing at Southampton City Art Gallery until 29th October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this June
We spotlight some of the best exhibitions running in the UK this month

I Made This For You, Thomas Albdorf, 2017

Thomas Albdorf at Belfast Exposed Photography

Straddling the line between photography and sculpture, the work of Vienna-based conceptual artist Thomas Albdorf deliberately disorientates viewers, reframing and recontextualising familiar images until they’re rendered unintelligible. The majority of Albdorf’s work takes place not in the production or composition of his photographs, but in their post-production, a process which allows greater imaginative potential; after creating his images, he often submits them to online image recognition software in order to test whether his creations can trick them into thinking they are ‘real’. The combination of digital and analogue technologies conceptually echoes the history of the medium itself, arguably evolved further with the introduction of post-production, allowing the apparently infinite altering of an image to the point of decontextualisation, echoing the ephemeral, shifting perceptions of the modern world online. The three bodies of work on display at Belfast Exposed Photography demonstrate these sensibilities of Thomas Albdorf’s work, and form part of the Belfast Photo Festival 2022.

Thomas Albdorf is showing at Belfast Exposed Photography until 16th July

Glasgow Tenements, James Morrison, 1960

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 at The Scottish Gallery

Two years after his death in 2020, The Scottish Gallery hosts a major retrospective dedicated to beloved Scottish artist James Morrison, taking over both floors of the gallery and spanning Morrison’s seven decade-long career. One of the most distinctive and instantly recognisable Scottish artists of the last fifty years, Morrison’s instantly recognisable technique is credited with helping to reinvigorate landscape painting in Scotland. The displaying of the exhibition at The Scottish Gallery is fitting given its historic association with James Morrison since 1959, which ultimately allowed the artist to retire from his job teaching at Dundee’s Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art to focus on painting full-time in 1987. The pieces being shown display the variety of Scottish landscapes throughout the seasons as focalised through the distinctive eye of Morrison and, with over 100 works from across his career, this exhibition serves as a comprehensive retrospective of a much-loved national artist.

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 is showing at The Scottish Gallery until 25th June

LOVE (Red Blue Green), Robert Indiana, 1966-1998

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2018 at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

This exhibition may have been running since March, but with the weather picking up, there’s no better time to appreciate this large-scale outdoor retrospective of Robert Indiana’s work at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Covering six decades of the sculptor's work, the collection is perhaps best embodied by his iconic piece LOVE (Red Blue Green) (1966-1998), a colossal piece which greets visitors at the park’s entrance; with its message of universal tolerance and acceptance, pieces such as this remain relevant in contemporary struggles against racism and discrimination to LGBTQIA+ communities. While traditionally displayed in urban spaces, the presence of LOVE in the Yorkshire countryside is striking, and serves as a fitting introduction of the rest of the work on display; Mississippi (1965), for instance, was conceived as a contemporary response to the violence which met the civil rights protests in the 50s and 60s, Ash (1985) references the queer community’s response to the AIDS crisis, and Love Rising (The Black and White Love) (1968) was created following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. With pieces such as these displayed alongside exciting contemporary sculptures by Damien Hirst and Jordan McKenzie, summer is undoubtedly the best time to visit the park.

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2020 is showing at Yorkshire Sculpture Park until 8th January 2023

Three Thousand Species of Fungi in the New Forest, Kurt Jackson, 2019

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity at Southampton City Art Gallery

Continuing a series of exhibitions exploring the climate crisis and environmental concerns, Biodiversity features sculptures, paintings and found objects by Kurt Jackson. The pieces themselves were created in locations around the UK including such natural areas as the south coast and the New Forest. While, as the title of the exhibition would suggest, Jackson’s pieces often spotlight diversity of flora and fauna found throughout the country, perhaps even more of a focus is the interdependence of various creatures and plants within the landscape, and the myriad ways in which human intervention is disrupting this natural order. As such, the show stands as a call for action and acknowledgement of humanity’s responsibility in the face of potential catastrophe.

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity is showing at Southampton City Art Gallery until 29th October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this June
We spotlight some of the best exhibitions running in the UK this month

I Made This For You, Thomas Albdorf, 2017

Thomas Albdorf at Belfast Exposed Photography

Straddling the line between photography and sculpture, the work of Vienna-based conceptual artist Thomas Albdorf deliberately disorientates viewers, reframing and recontextualising familiar images until they’re rendered unintelligible. The majority of Albdorf’s work takes place not in the production or composition of his photographs, but in their post-production, a process which allows greater imaginative potential; after creating his images, he often submits them to online image recognition software in order to test whether his creations can trick them into thinking they are ‘real’. The combination of digital and analogue technologies conceptually echoes the history of the medium itself, arguably evolved further with the introduction of post-production, allowing the apparently infinite altering of an image to the point of decontextualisation, echoing the ephemeral, shifting perceptions of the modern world online. The three bodies of work on display at Belfast Exposed Photography demonstrate these sensibilities of Thomas Albdorf’s work, and form part of the Belfast Photo Festival 2022.

Thomas Albdorf is showing at Belfast Exposed Photography until 16th July

Glasgow Tenements, James Morrison, 1960

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 at The Scottish Gallery

Two years after his death in 2020, The Scottish Gallery hosts a major retrospective dedicated to beloved Scottish artist James Morrison, taking over both floors of the gallery and spanning Morrison’s seven decade-long career. One of the most distinctive and instantly recognisable Scottish artists of the last fifty years, Morrison’s instantly recognisable technique is credited with helping to reinvigorate landscape painting in Scotland. The displaying of the exhibition at The Scottish Gallery is fitting given its historic association with James Morrison since 1959, which ultimately allowed the artist to retire from his job teaching at Dundee’s Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art to focus on painting full-time in 1987. The pieces being shown display the variety of Scottish landscapes throughout the seasons as focalised through the distinctive eye of Morrison and, with over 100 works from across his career, this exhibition serves as a comprehensive retrospective of a much-loved national artist.

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 is showing at The Scottish Gallery until 25th June

LOVE (Red Blue Green), Robert Indiana, 1966-1998

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2018 at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

This exhibition may have been running since March, but with the weather picking up, there’s no better time to appreciate this large-scale outdoor retrospective of Robert Indiana’s work at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Covering six decades of the sculptor's work, the collection is perhaps best embodied by his iconic piece LOVE (Red Blue Green) (1966-1998), a colossal piece which greets visitors at the park’s entrance; with its message of universal tolerance and acceptance, pieces such as this remain relevant in contemporary struggles against racism and discrimination to LGBTQIA+ communities. While traditionally displayed in urban spaces, the presence of LOVE in the Yorkshire countryside is striking, and serves as a fitting introduction of the rest of the work on display; Mississippi (1965), for instance, was conceived as a contemporary response to the violence which met the civil rights protests in the 50s and 60s, Ash (1985) references the queer community’s response to the AIDS crisis, and Love Rising (The Black and White Love) (1968) was created following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. With pieces such as these displayed alongside exciting contemporary sculptures by Damien Hirst and Jordan McKenzie, summer is undoubtedly the best time to visit the park.

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2020 is showing at Yorkshire Sculpture Park until 8th January 2023

Three Thousand Species of Fungi in the New Forest, Kurt Jackson, 2019

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity at Southampton City Art Gallery

Continuing a series of exhibitions exploring the climate crisis and environmental concerns, Biodiversity features sculptures, paintings and found objects by Kurt Jackson. The pieces themselves were created in locations around the UK including such natural areas as the south coast and the New Forest. While, as the title of the exhibition would suggest, Jackson’s pieces often spotlight diversity of flora and fauna found throughout the country, perhaps even more of a focus is the interdependence of various creatures and plants within the landscape, and the myriad ways in which human intervention is disrupting this natural order. As such, the show stands as a call for action and acknowledgement of humanity’s responsibility in the face of potential catastrophe.

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity is showing at Southampton City Art Gallery until 29th October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this June
We spotlight some of the best exhibitions running in the UK this month

I Made This For You, Thomas Albdorf, 2017

Thomas Albdorf at Belfast Exposed Photography

Straddling the line between photography and sculpture, the work of Vienna-based conceptual artist Thomas Albdorf deliberately disorientates viewers, reframing and recontextualising familiar images until they’re rendered unintelligible. The majority of Albdorf’s work takes place not in the production or composition of his photographs, but in their post-production, a process which allows greater imaginative potential; after creating his images, he often submits them to online image recognition software in order to test whether his creations can trick them into thinking they are ‘real’. The combination of digital and analogue technologies conceptually echoes the history of the medium itself, arguably evolved further with the introduction of post-production, allowing the apparently infinite altering of an image to the point of decontextualisation, echoing the ephemeral, shifting perceptions of the modern world online. The three bodies of work on display at Belfast Exposed Photography demonstrate these sensibilities of Thomas Albdorf’s work, and form part of the Belfast Photo Festival 2022.

Thomas Albdorf is showing at Belfast Exposed Photography until 16th July

Glasgow Tenements, James Morrison, 1960

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 at The Scottish Gallery

Two years after his death in 2020, The Scottish Gallery hosts a major retrospective dedicated to beloved Scottish artist James Morrison, taking over both floors of the gallery and spanning Morrison’s seven decade-long career. One of the most distinctive and instantly recognisable Scottish artists of the last fifty years, Morrison’s instantly recognisable technique is credited with helping to reinvigorate landscape painting in Scotland. The displaying of the exhibition at The Scottish Gallery is fitting given its historic association with James Morrison since 1959, which ultimately allowed the artist to retire from his job teaching at Dundee’s Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art to focus on painting full-time in 1987. The pieces being shown display the variety of Scottish landscapes throughout the seasons as focalised through the distinctive eye of Morrison and, with over 100 works from across his career, this exhibition serves as a comprehensive retrospective of a much-loved national artist.

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 is showing at The Scottish Gallery until 25th June

LOVE (Red Blue Green), Robert Indiana, 1966-1998

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2018 at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

This exhibition may have been running since March, but with the weather picking up, there’s no better time to appreciate this large-scale outdoor retrospective of Robert Indiana’s work at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Covering six decades of the sculptor's work, the collection is perhaps best embodied by his iconic piece LOVE (Red Blue Green) (1966-1998), a colossal piece which greets visitors at the park’s entrance; with its message of universal tolerance and acceptance, pieces such as this remain relevant in contemporary struggles against racism and discrimination to LGBTQIA+ communities. While traditionally displayed in urban spaces, the presence of LOVE in the Yorkshire countryside is striking, and serves as a fitting introduction of the rest of the work on display; Mississippi (1965), for instance, was conceived as a contemporary response to the violence which met the civil rights protests in the 50s and 60s, Ash (1985) references the queer community’s response to the AIDS crisis, and Love Rising (The Black and White Love) (1968) was created following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. With pieces such as these displayed alongside exciting contemporary sculptures by Damien Hirst and Jordan McKenzie, summer is undoubtedly the best time to visit the park.

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2020 is showing at Yorkshire Sculpture Park until 8th January 2023

Three Thousand Species of Fungi in the New Forest, Kurt Jackson, 2019

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity at Southampton City Art Gallery

Continuing a series of exhibitions exploring the climate crisis and environmental concerns, Biodiversity features sculptures, paintings and found objects by Kurt Jackson. The pieces themselves were created in locations around the UK including such natural areas as the south coast and the New Forest. While, as the title of the exhibition would suggest, Jackson’s pieces often spotlight diversity of flora and fauna found throughout the country, perhaps even more of a focus is the interdependence of various creatures and plants within the landscape, and the myriad ways in which human intervention is disrupting this natural order. As such, the show stands as a call for action and acknowledgement of humanity’s responsibility in the face of potential catastrophe.

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity is showing at Southampton City Art Gallery until 29th October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this June
We spotlight some of the best exhibitions running in the UK this month

I Made This For You, Thomas Albdorf, 2017

Thomas Albdorf at Belfast Exposed Photography

Straddling the line between photography and sculpture, the work of Vienna-based conceptual artist Thomas Albdorf deliberately disorientates viewers, reframing and recontextualising familiar images until they’re rendered unintelligible. The majority of Albdorf’s work takes place not in the production or composition of his photographs, but in their post-production, a process which allows greater imaginative potential; after creating his images, he often submits them to online image recognition software in order to test whether his creations can trick them into thinking they are ‘real’. The combination of digital and analogue technologies conceptually echoes the history of the medium itself, arguably evolved further with the introduction of post-production, allowing the apparently infinite altering of an image to the point of decontextualisation, echoing the ephemeral, shifting perceptions of the modern world online. The three bodies of work on display at Belfast Exposed Photography demonstrate these sensibilities of Thomas Albdorf’s work, and form part of the Belfast Photo Festival 2022.

Thomas Albdorf is showing at Belfast Exposed Photography until 16th July

Glasgow Tenements, James Morrison, 1960

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 at The Scottish Gallery

Two years after his death in 2020, The Scottish Gallery hosts a major retrospective dedicated to beloved Scottish artist James Morrison, taking over both floors of the gallery and spanning Morrison’s seven decade-long career. One of the most distinctive and instantly recognisable Scottish artists of the last fifty years, Morrison’s instantly recognisable technique is credited with helping to reinvigorate landscape painting in Scotland. The displaying of the exhibition at The Scottish Gallery is fitting given its historic association with James Morrison since 1959, which ultimately allowed the artist to retire from his job teaching at Dundee’s Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art to focus on painting full-time in 1987. The pieces being shown display the variety of Scottish landscapes throughout the seasons as focalised through the distinctive eye of Morrison and, with over 100 works from across his career, this exhibition serves as a comprehensive retrospective of a much-loved national artist.

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 is showing at The Scottish Gallery until 25th June

LOVE (Red Blue Green), Robert Indiana, 1966-1998

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2018 at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

This exhibition may have been running since March, but with the weather picking up, there’s no better time to appreciate this large-scale outdoor retrospective of Robert Indiana’s work at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Covering six decades of the sculptor's work, the collection is perhaps best embodied by his iconic piece LOVE (Red Blue Green) (1966-1998), a colossal piece which greets visitors at the park’s entrance; with its message of universal tolerance and acceptance, pieces such as this remain relevant in contemporary struggles against racism and discrimination to LGBTQIA+ communities. While traditionally displayed in urban spaces, the presence of LOVE in the Yorkshire countryside is striking, and serves as a fitting introduction of the rest of the work on display; Mississippi (1965), for instance, was conceived as a contemporary response to the violence which met the civil rights protests in the 50s and 60s, Ash (1985) references the queer community’s response to the AIDS crisis, and Love Rising (The Black and White Love) (1968) was created following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. With pieces such as these displayed alongside exciting contemporary sculptures by Damien Hirst and Jordan McKenzie, summer is undoubtedly the best time to visit the park.

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2020 is showing at Yorkshire Sculpture Park until 8th January 2023

Three Thousand Species of Fungi in the New Forest, Kurt Jackson, 2019

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity at Southampton City Art Gallery

Continuing a series of exhibitions exploring the climate crisis and environmental concerns, Biodiversity features sculptures, paintings and found objects by Kurt Jackson. The pieces themselves were created in locations around the UK including such natural areas as the south coast and the New Forest. While, as the title of the exhibition would suggest, Jackson’s pieces often spotlight diversity of flora and fauna found throughout the country, perhaps even more of a focus is the interdependence of various creatures and plants within the landscape, and the myriad ways in which human intervention is disrupting this natural order. As such, the show stands as a call for action and acknowledgement of humanity’s responsibility in the face of potential catastrophe.

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity is showing at Southampton City Art Gallery until 29th October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this June

I Made This For You, Thomas Albdorf, 2017

Thomas Albdorf at Belfast Exposed Photography

Straddling the line between photography and sculpture, the work of Vienna-based conceptual artist Thomas Albdorf deliberately disorientates viewers, reframing and recontextualising familiar images until they’re rendered unintelligible. The majority of Albdorf’s work takes place not in the production or composition of his photographs, but in their post-production, a process which allows greater imaginative potential; after creating his images, he often submits them to online image recognition software in order to test whether his creations can trick them into thinking they are ‘real’. The combination of digital and analogue technologies conceptually echoes the history of the medium itself, arguably evolved further with the introduction of post-production, allowing the apparently infinite altering of an image to the point of decontextualisation, echoing the ephemeral, shifting perceptions of the modern world online. The three bodies of work on display at Belfast Exposed Photography demonstrate these sensibilities of Thomas Albdorf’s work, and form part of the Belfast Photo Festival 2022.

Thomas Albdorf is showing at Belfast Exposed Photography until 16th July

Glasgow Tenements, James Morrison, 1960

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 at The Scottish Gallery

Two years after his death in 2020, The Scottish Gallery hosts a major retrospective dedicated to beloved Scottish artist James Morrison, taking over both floors of the gallery and spanning Morrison’s seven decade-long career. One of the most distinctive and instantly recognisable Scottish artists of the last fifty years, Morrison’s instantly recognisable technique is credited with helping to reinvigorate landscape painting in Scotland. The displaying of the exhibition at The Scottish Gallery is fitting given its historic association with James Morrison since 1959, which ultimately allowed the artist to retire from his job teaching at Dundee’s Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art to focus on painting full-time in 1987. The pieces being shown display the variety of Scottish landscapes throughout the seasons as focalised through the distinctive eye of Morrison and, with over 100 works from across his career, this exhibition serves as a comprehensive retrospective of a much-loved national artist.

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 is showing at The Scottish Gallery until 25th June

LOVE (Red Blue Green), Robert Indiana, 1966-1998

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2018 at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

This exhibition may have been running since March, but with the weather picking up, there’s no better time to appreciate this large-scale outdoor retrospective of Robert Indiana’s work at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Covering six decades of the sculptor's work, the collection is perhaps best embodied by his iconic piece LOVE (Red Blue Green) (1966-1998), a colossal piece which greets visitors at the park’s entrance; with its message of universal tolerance and acceptance, pieces such as this remain relevant in contemporary struggles against racism and discrimination to LGBTQIA+ communities. While traditionally displayed in urban spaces, the presence of LOVE in the Yorkshire countryside is striking, and serves as a fitting introduction of the rest of the work on display; Mississippi (1965), for instance, was conceived as a contemporary response to the violence which met the civil rights protests in the 50s and 60s, Ash (1985) references the queer community’s response to the AIDS crisis, and Love Rising (The Black and White Love) (1968) was created following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. With pieces such as these displayed alongside exciting contemporary sculptures by Damien Hirst and Jordan McKenzie, summer is undoubtedly the best time to visit the park.

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2020 is showing at Yorkshire Sculpture Park until 8th January 2023

Three Thousand Species of Fungi in the New Forest, Kurt Jackson, 2019

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity at Southampton City Art Gallery

Continuing a series of exhibitions exploring the climate crisis and environmental concerns, Biodiversity features sculptures, paintings and found objects by Kurt Jackson. The pieces themselves were created in locations around the UK including such natural areas as the south coast and the New Forest. While, as the title of the exhibition would suggest, Jackson’s pieces often spotlight diversity of flora and fauna found throughout the country, perhaps even more of a focus is the interdependence of various creatures and plants within the landscape, and the myriad ways in which human intervention is disrupting this natural order. As such, the show stands as a call for action and acknowledgement of humanity’s responsibility in the face of potential catastrophe.

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity is showing at Southampton City Art Gallery until 29th October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this June
We spotlight some of the best exhibitions running in the UK this month

I Made This For You, Thomas Albdorf, 2017

Thomas Albdorf at Belfast Exposed Photography

Straddling the line between photography and sculpture, the work of Vienna-based conceptual artist Thomas Albdorf deliberately disorientates viewers, reframing and recontextualising familiar images until they’re rendered unintelligible. The majority of Albdorf’s work takes place not in the production or composition of his photographs, but in their post-production, a process which allows greater imaginative potential; after creating his images, he often submits them to online image recognition software in order to test whether his creations can trick them into thinking they are ‘real’. The combination of digital and analogue technologies conceptually echoes the history of the medium itself, arguably evolved further with the introduction of post-production, allowing the apparently infinite altering of an image to the point of decontextualisation, echoing the ephemeral, shifting perceptions of the modern world online. The three bodies of work on display at Belfast Exposed Photography demonstrate these sensibilities of Thomas Albdorf’s work, and form part of the Belfast Photo Festival 2022.

Thomas Albdorf is showing at Belfast Exposed Photography until 16th July

Glasgow Tenements, James Morrison, 1960

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 at The Scottish Gallery

Two years after his death in 2020, The Scottish Gallery hosts a major retrospective dedicated to beloved Scottish artist James Morrison, taking over both floors of the gallery and spanning Morrison’s seven decade-long career. One of the most distinctive and instantly recognisable Scottish artists of the last fifty years, Morrison’s instantly recognisable technique is credited with helping to reinvigorate landscape painting in Scotland. The displaying of the exhibition at The Scottish Gallery is fitting given its historic association with James Morrison since 1959, which ultimately allowed the artist to retire from his job teaching at Dundee’s Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art to focus on painting full-time in 1987. The pieces being shown display the variety of Scottish landscapes throughout the seasons as focalised through the distinctive eye of Morrison and, with over 100 works from across his career, this exhibition serves as a comprehensive retrospective of a much-loved national artist.

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 is showing at The Scottish Gallery until 25th June

LOVE (Red Blue Green), Robert Indiana, 1966-1998

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2018 at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

This exhibition may have been running since March, but with the weather picking up, there’s no better time to appreciate this large-scale outdoor retrospective of Robert Indiana’s work at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Covering six decades of the sculptor's work, the collection is perhaps best embodied by his iconic piece LOVE (Red Blue Green) (1966-1998), a colossal piece which greets visitors at the park’s entrance; with its message of universal tolerance and acceptance, pieces such as this remain relevant in contemporary struggles against racism and discrimination to LGBTQIA+ communities. While traditionally displayed in urban spaces, the presence of LOVE in the Yorkshire countryside is striking, and serves as a fitting introduction of the rest of the work on display; Mississippi (1965), for instance, was conceived as a contemporary response to the violence which met the civil rights protests in the 50s and 60s, Ash (1985) references the queer community’s response to the AIDS crisis, and Love Rising (The Black and White Love) (1968) was created following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. With pieces such as these displayed alongside exciting contemporary sculptures by Damien Hirst and Jordan McKenzie, summer is undoubtedly the best time to visit the park.

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2020 is showing at Yorkshire Sculpture Park until 8th January 2023

Three Thousand Species of Fungi in the New Forest, Kurt Jackson, 2019

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity at Southampton City Art Gallery

Continuing a series of exhibitions exploring the climate crisis and environmental concerns, Biodiversity features sculptures, paintings and found objects by Kurt Jackson. The pieces themselves were created in locations around the UK including such natural areas as the south coast and the New Forest. While, as the title of the exhibition would suggest, Jackson’s pieces often spotlight diversity of flora and fauna found throughout the country, perhaps even more of a focus is the interdependence of various creatures and plants within the landscape, and the myriad ways in which human intervention is disrupting this natural order. As such, the show stands as a call for action and acknowledgement of humanity’s responsibility in the face of potential catastrophe.

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity is showing at Southampton City Art Gallery until 29th October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this June
We spotlight some of the best exhibitions running in the UK this month

I Made This For You, Thomas Albdorf, 2017

Thomas Albdorf at Belfast Exposed Photography

Straddling the line between photography and sculpture, the work of Vienna-based conceptual artist Thomas Albdorf deliberately disorientates viewers, reframing and recontextualising familiar images until they’re rendered unintelligible. The majority of Albdorf’s work takes place not in the production or composition of his photographs, but in their post-production, a process which allows greater imaginative potential; after creating his images, he often submits them to online image recognition software in order to test whether his creations can trick them into thinking they are ‘real’. The combination of digital and analogue technologies conceptually echoes the history of the medium itself, arguably evolved further with the introduction of post-production, allowing the apparently infinite altering of an image to the point of decontextualisation, echoing the ephemeral, shifting perceptions of the modern world online. The three bodies of work on display at Belfast Exposed Photography demonstrate these sensibilities of Thomas Albdorf’s work, and form part of the Belfast Photo Festival 2022.

Thomas Albdorf is showing at Belfast Exposed Photography until 16th July

Glasgow Tenements, James Morrison, 1960

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 at The Scottish Gallery

Two years after his death in 2020, The Scottish Gallery hosts a major retrospective dedicated to beloved Scottish artist James Morrison, taking over both floors of the gallery and spanning Morrison’s seven decade-long career. One of the most distinctive and instantly recognisable Scottish artists of the last fifty years, Morrison’s instantly recognisable technique is credited with helping to reinvigorate landscape painting in Scotland. The displaying of the exhibition at The Scottish Gallery is fitting given its historic association with James Morrison since 1959, which ultimately allowed the artist to retire from his job teaching at Dundee’s Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art to focus on painting full-time in 1987. The pieces being shown display the variety of Scottish landscapes throughout the seasons as focalised through the distinctive eye of Morrison and, with over 100 works from across his career, this exhibition serves as a comprehensive retrospective of a much-loved national artist.

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 is showing at The Scottish Gallery until 25th June

LOVE (Red Blue Green), Robert Indiana, 1966-1998

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2018 at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

This exhibition may have been running since March, but with the weather picking up, there’s no better time to appreciate this large-scale outdoor retrospective of Robert Indiana’s work at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Covering six decades of the sculptor's work, the collection is perhaps best embodied by his iconic piece LOVE (Red Blue Green) (1966-1998), a colossal piece which greets visitors at the park’s entrance; with its message of universal tolerance and acceptance, pieces such as this remain relevant in contemporary struggles against racism and discrimination to LGBTQIA+ communities. While traditionally displayed in urban spaces, the presence of LOVE in the Yorkshire countryside is striking, and serves as a fitting introduction of the rest of the work on display; Mississippi (1965), for instance, was conceived as a contemporary response to the violence which met the civil rights protests in the 50s and 60s, Ash (1985) references the queer community’s response to the AIDS crisis, and Love Rising (The Black and White Love) (1968) was created following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. With pieces such as these displayed alongside exciting contemporary sculptures by Damien Hirst and Jordan McKenzie, summer is undoubtedly the best time to visit the park.

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2020 is showing at Yorkshire Sculpture Park until 8th January 2023

Three Thousand Species of Fungi in the New Forest, Kurt Jackson, 2019

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity at Southampton City Art Gallery

Continuing a series of exhibitions exploring the climate crisis and environmental concerns, Biodiversity features sculptures, paintings and found objects by Kurt Jackson. The pieces themselves were created in locations around the UK including such natural areas as the south coast and the New Forest. While, as the title of the exhibition would suggest, Jackson’s pieces often spotlight diversity of flora and fauna found throughout the country, perhaps even more of a focus is the interdependence of various creatures and plants within the landscape, and the myriad ways in which human intervention is disrupting this natural order. As such, the show stands as a call for action and acknowledgement of humanity’s responsibility in the face of potential catastrophe.

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity is showing at Southampton City Art Gallery until 29th October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
07/06/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
UK Exhibitions to see this June
We spotlight some of the best exhibitions running in the UK this month

I Made This For You, Thomas Albdorf, 2017

Thomas Albdorf at Belfast Exposed Photography

Straddling the line between photography and sculpture, the work of Vienna-based conceptual artist Thomas Albdorf deliberately disorientates viewers, reframing and recontextualising familiar images until they’re rendered unintelligible. The majority of Albdorf’s work takes place not in the production or composition of his photographs, but in their post-production, a process which allows greater imaginative potential; after creating his images, he often submits them to online image recognition software in order to test whether his creations can trick them into thinking they are ‘real’. The combination of digital and analogue technologies conceptually echoes the history of the medium itself, arguably evolved further with the introduction of post-production, allowing the apparently infinite altering of an image to the point of decontextualisation, echoing the ephemeral, shifting perceptions of the modern world online. The three bodies of work on display at Belfast Exposed Photography demonstrate these sensibilities of Thomas Albdorf’s work, and form part of the Belfast Photo Festival 2022.

Thomas Albdorf is showing at Belfast Exposed Photography until 16th July

Glasgow Tenements, James Morrison, 1960

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 at The Scottish Gallery

Two years after his death in 2020, The Scottish Gallery hosts a major retrospective dedicated to beloved Scottish artist James Morrison, taking over both floors of the gallery and spanning Morrison’s seven decade-long career. One of the most distinctive and instantly recognisable Scottish artists of the last fifty years, Morrison’s instantly recognisable technique is credited with helping to reinvigorate landscape painting in Scotland. The displaying of the exhibition at The Scottish Gallery is fitting given its historic association with James Morrison since 1959, which ultimately allowed the artist to retire from his job teaching at Dundee’s Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art to focus on painting full-time in 1987. The pieces being shown display the variety of Scottish landscapes throughout the seasons as focalised through the distinctive eye of Morrison and, with over 100 works from across his career, this exhibition serves as a comprehensive retrospective of a much-loved national artist.

James Morrison: A Celebration 1932-2020 is showing at The Scottish Gallery until 25th June

LOVE (Red Blue Green), Robert Indiana, 1966-1998

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2018 at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

This exhibition may have been running since March, but with the weather picking up, there’s no better time to appreciate this large-scale outdoor retrospective of Robert Indiana’s work at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Covering six decades of the sculptor's work, the collection is perhaps best embodied by his iconic piece LOVE (Red Blue Green) (1966-1998), a colossal piece which greets visitors at the park’s entrance; with its message of universal tolerance and acceptance, pieces such as this remain relevant in contemporary struggles against racism and discrimination to LGBTQIA+ communities. While traditionally displayed in urban spaces, the presence of LOVE in the Yorkshire countryside is striking, and serves as a fitting introduction of the rest of the work on display; Mississippi (1965), for instance, was conceived as a contemporary response to the violence which met the civil rights protests in the 50s and 60s, Ash (1985) references the queer community’s response to the AIDS crisis, and Love Rising (The Black and White Love) (1968) was created following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. With pieces such as these displayed alongside exciting contemporary sculptures by Damien Hirst and Jordan McKenzie, summer is undoubtedly the best time to visit the park.

Robert Indiana: Sculpture 1958-2020 is showing at Yorkshire Sculpture Park until 8th January 2023

Three Thousand Species of Fungi in the New Forest, Kurt Jackson, 2019

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity at Southampton City Art Gallery

Continuing a series of exhibitions exploring the climate crisis and environmental concerns, Biodiversity features sculptures, paintings and found objects by Kurt Jackson. The pieces themselves were created in locations around the UK including such natural areas as the south coast and the New Forest. While, as the title of the exhibition would suggest, Jackson’s pieces often spotlight diversity of flora and fauna found throughout the country, perhaps even more of a focus is the interdependence of various creatures and plants within the landscape, and the myriad ways in which human intervention is disrupting this natural order. As such, the show stands as a call for action and acknowledgement of humanity’s responsibility in the face of potential catastrophe.

Kurt Jackson: Biodiversity is showing at Southampton City Art Gallery until 29th October 2022

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
Thanks For Reading
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.