24/01/2023
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London in 2023
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing this year in the capital

The Rossettis at Tate Britain

Lady Affixing Pennant to a Knight’s Spear, Elizabeth Siddal, 1856

The Tate’s first retrospective of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the largest exhibition of his artworks in two decades, The Rossettis tracks the boundary-pushing careers of the Rossetti generation, not just of Dante Gabriel, but also of Christina and Elizabeth (née Siddal). From the Pre-Raphaelites and beyond, the works on display track the development of one of art history’s most influential families, not just in form but in their revolutionary countercultural depictions of life, romance and interpersonal relationships. More than just displaying artworks, The Rossettis utilises photography, design and spoken poetry to create a truly immersive investigation in the lives of the family and the various myths surrounding them. (Incidentally, an investigation into Christina Rossetti’s poetry couldn’t be better-timed; an appraisal of The Goblin Market (1859) comes on the back of ‘goblin mode’ being voted the Oxford word of the year). Perhaps most excitingly, however, is that the exhibition stands as the most comprehensive display of Elizabeth Siddal’s work in 30 years; as a self-taught working class artist, her art was frequently overshadowed by tragically early death and mythologising as a muse for John Everett Millais’ Ophelia. For her to be celebrated as an artist in her own right in such a major London exhibition is undoubtedly deserved and long-overdue.

The Rossettis is showing at Tate Britain from 6th April until 24th September.

Beyond the Streets London at Saatchi Gallery

Lil Crazy Legs, Martha Cooper, 1983

Featuring over 150 international artists and coming after previous blockbuster exhibitions in Los Angeles in 2018 and New York in 2019, Beyond the Streets London marks the first time in eight years that a show has occupied the entirety of Saatchi Gallery. Through original artworks, photography, site-specific installations and ephemera, the exhibition pays homage to the history of street art through the artists of graffiti, street art, hip-hop and punk rock. With cultural attitudes towards street art shifting significantly over the years, the medium’s narrative traces underground art and counterculture, challenging both authority and preconceived notions of where art can spring from. Curator and graffiti historian Roger Gastman notes that “The story of graffiti and street art can’t be told without highlighting the significant role London, and the UK in general played in revolutionising these cultures and continuing to spread the word of their existence”, marking the significance of the exhibition making its way to the capital.

Beyond the Streets London is showing at Saatchi Gallery from 17th February until 9th May.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art at The National Gallery

Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses), Paul Cézanne, c. 1894–1905

Made up of loans from museums and private collections around the world and boasting works by such names as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Rodin, Picasso, Matisse, Klimt, Kandinsky, Mondrian and more, After Impressionism traces the giants of European art through the late 19th and early 20th centuries. While the exhibitions celebrated Paris as the artistic capital of the continent at the time, The National Gallery will also display works from Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Vienna and Barcelona showcasing the formation of various different modernist movements such as Expressionism, Cubism and Abstraction. As European society crept towards the First World War, social and political instability led artists to break with tradition, questioning and experimenting with the very form of art. More than just displaying the works, however, the exhibition will invite viewers to consider modernist separation with conventional depictions of the external world, giving rise to more expressive and conceptual depictions of subjects, stories and emotions. Displaying artworks by some of the most influential figures in the Western art world, After Impressionism stands as a must-visit for anyone interested in art history, or tracing the style and influences of their favourite contemporary artists.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art is showing at The National Gallery from 25th March until 13th August.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief at Camden Arts Centre

Tell My Troubles to the Eight Ball (Eureka), Martin Wong, 1978-81

Drawing inspiration from such myriad sources as graffiti, urban poetry, Chinese iconography, carceral aesthetics and sign language, the work of Martin Wong (1946-1999) remains just as vital and energising as when it was created. Inspired equally by his Chinese-American heritage and the Latin-American community he became closely involved with, Wong’s unapologetically political paintings and sculptures make this exhibition a perfect companion piece to Saatchi Gallery’s Beyond the Streets London, with his countercultural depiction of the 70s, 80s and 90s depicting communities on the margins being displaced by gentrification, as well as queer existence within both East and West coast Chinatowns. An antidote to the reactionary discourse frequently found in late 20th Century American art, Martin Wong’s Malicious Mischief of this exhibition’s title is aimed squarely at the political and cultural establishment of the time, uncompromisingly challenging it and pushing for a more accepting society.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief is showing at Camden Arts Centre from 16th June until 17th September.

‍‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
24/01/2023
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London in 2023
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing this year in the capital

The Rossettis at Tate Britain

Lady Affixing Pennant to a Knight’s Spear, Elizabeth Siddal, 1856

The Tate’s first retrospective of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the largest exhibition of his artworks in two decades, The Rossettis tracks the boundary-pushing careers of the Rossetti generation, not just of Dante Gabriel, but also of Christina and Elizabeth (née Siddal). From the Pre-Raphaelites and beyond, the works on display track the development of one of art history’s most influential families, not just in form but in their revolutionary countercultural depictions of life, romance and interpersonal relationships. More than just displaying artworks, The Rossettis utilises photography, design and spoken poetry to create a truly immersive investigation in the lives of the family and the various myths surrounding them. (Incidentally, an investigation into Christina Rossetti’s poetry couldn’t be better-timed; an appraisal of The Goblin Market (1859) comes on the back of ‘goblin mode’ being voted the Oxford word of the year). Perhaps most excitingly, however, is that the exhibition stands as the most comprehensive display of Elizabeth Siddal’s work in 30 years; as a self-taught working class artist, her art was frequently overshadowed by tragically early death and mythologising as a muse for John Everett Millais’ Ophelia. For her to be celebrated as an artist in her own right in such a major London exhibition is undoubtedly deserved and long-overdue.

The Rossettis is showing at Tate Britain from 6th April until 24th September.

Beyond the Streets London at Saatchi Gallery

Lil Crazy Legs, Martha Cooper, 1983

Featuring over 150 international artists and coming after previous blockbuster exhibitions in Los Angeles in 2018 and New York in 2019, Beyond the Streets London marks the first time in eight years that a show has occupied the entirety of Saatchi Gallery. Through original artworks, photography, site-specific installations and ephemera, the exhibition pays homage to the history of street art through the artists of graffiti, street art, hip-hop and punk rock. With cultural attitudes towards street art shifting significantly over the years, the medium’s narrative traces underground art and counterculture, challenging both authority and preconceived notions of where art can spring from. Curator and graffiti historian Roger Gastman notes that “The story of graffiti and street art can’t be told without highlighting the significant role London, and the UK in general played in revolutionising these cultures and continuing to spread the word of their existence”, marking the significance of the exhibition making its way to the capital.

Beyond the Streets London is showing at Saatchi Gallery from 17th February until 9th May.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art at The National Gallery

Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses), Paul Cézanne, c. 1894–1905

Made up of loans from museums and private collections around the world and boasting works by such names as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Rodin, Picasso, Matisse, Klimt, Kandinsky, Mondrian and more, After Impressionism traces the giants of European art through the late 19th and early 20th centuries. While the exhibitions celebrated Paris as the artistic capital of the continent at the time, The National Gallery will also display works from Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Vienna and Barcelona showcasing the formation of various different modernist movements such as Expressionism, Cubism and Abstraction. As European society crept towards the First World War, social and political instability led artists to break with tradition, questioning and experimenting with the very form of art. More than just displaying the works, however, the exhibition will invite viewers to consider modernist separation with conventional depictions of the external world, giving rise to more expressive and conceptual depictions of subjects, stories and emotions. Displaying artworks by some of the most influential figures in the Western art world, After Impressionism stands as a must-visit for anyone interested in art history, or tracing the style and influences of their favourite contemporary artists.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art is showing at The National Gallery from 25th March until 13th August.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief at Camden Arts Centre

Tell My Troubles to the Eight Ball (Eureka), Martin Wong, 1978-81

Drawing inspiration from such myriad sources as graffiti, urban poetry, Chinese iconography, carceral aesthetics and sign language, the work of Martin Wong (1946-1999) remains just as vital and energising as when it was created. Inspired equally by his Chinese-American heritage and the Latin-American community he became closely involved with, Wong’s unapologetically political paintings and sculptures make this exhibition a perfect companion piece to Saatchi Gallery’s Beyond the Streets London, with his countercultural depiction of the 70s, 80s and 90s depicting communities on the margins being displaced by gentrification, as well as queer existence within both East and West coast Chinatowns. An antidote to the reactionary discourse frequently found in late 20th Century American art, Martin Wong’s Malicious Mischief of this exhibition’s title is aimed squarely at the political and cultural establishment of the time, uncompromisingly challenging it and pushing for a more accepting society.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief is showing at Camden Arts Centre from 16th June until 17th September.

‍‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
24/01/2023
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London in 2023
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing this year in the capital

The Rossettis at Tate Britain

Lady Affixing Pennant to a Knight’s Spear, Elizabeth Siddal, 1856

The Tate’s first retrospective of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the largest exhibition of his artworks in two decades, The Rossettis tracks the boundary-pushing careers of the Rossetti generation, not just of Dante Gabriel, but also of Christina and Elizabeth (née Siddal). From the Pre-Raphaelites and beyond, the works on display track the development of one of art history’s most influential families, not just in form but in their revolutionary countercultural depictions of life, romance and interpersonal relationships. More than just displaying artworks, The Rossettis utilises photography, design and spoken poetry to create a truly immersive investigation in the lives of the family and the various myths surrounding them. (Incidentally, an investigation into Christina Rossetti’s poetry couldn’t be better-timed; an appraisal of The Goblin Market (1859) comes on the back of ‘goblin mode’ being voted the Oxford word of the year). Perhaps most excitingly, however, is that the exhibition stands as the most comprehensive display of Elizabeth Siddal’s work in 30 years; as a self-taught working class artist, her art was frequently overshadowed by tragically early death and mythologising as a muse for John Everett Millais’ Ophelia. For her to be celebrated as an artist in her own right in such a major London exhibition is undoubtedly deserved and long-overdue.

The Rossettis is showing at Tate Britain from 6th April until 24th September.

Beyond the Streets London at Saatchi Gallery

Lil Crazy Legs, Martha Cooper, 1983

Featuring over 150 international artists and coming after previous blockbuster exhibitions in Los Angeles in 2018 and New York in 2019, Beyond the Streets London marks the first time in eight years that a show has occupied the entirety of Saatchi Gallery. Through original artworks, photography, site-specific installations and ephemera, the exhibition pays homage to the history of street art through the artists of graffiti, street art, hip-hop and punk rock. With cultural attitudes towards street art shifting significantly over the years, the medium’s narrative traces underground art and counterculture, challenging both authority and preconceived notions of where art can spring from. Curator and graffiti historian Roger Gastman notes that “The story of graffiti and street art can’t be told without highlighting the significant role London, and the UK in general played in revolutionising these cultures and continuing to spread the word of their existence”, marking the significance of the exhibition making its way to the capital.

Beyond the Streets London is showing at Saatchi Gallery from 17th February until 9th May.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art at The National Gallery

Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses), Paul Cézanne, c. 1894–1905

Made up of loans from museums and private collections around the world and boasting works by such names as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Rodin, Picasso, Matisse, Klimt, Kandinsky, Mondrian and more, After Impressionism traces the giants of European art through the late 19th and early 20th centuries. While the exhibitions celebrated Paris as the artistic capital of the continent at the time, The National Gallery will also display works from Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Vienna and Barcelona showcasing the formation of various different modernist movements such as Expressionism, Cubism and Abstraction. As European society crept towards the First World War, social and political instability led artists to break with tradition, questioning and experimenting with the very form of art. More than just displaying the works, however, the exhibition will invite viewers to consider modernist separation with conventional depictions of the external world, giving rise to more expressive and conceptual depictions of subjects, stories and emotions. Displaying artworks by some of the most influential figures in the Western art world, After Impressionism stands as a must-visit for anyone interested in art history, or tracing the style and influences of their favourite contemporary artists.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art is showing at The National Gallery from 25th March until 13th August.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief at Camden Arts Centre

Tell My Troubles to the Eight Ball (Eureka), Martin Wong, 1978-81

Drawing inspiration from such myriad sources as graffiti, urban poetry, Chinese iconography, carceral aesthetics and sign language, the work of Martin Wong (1946-1999) remains just as vital and energising as when it was created. Inspired equally by his Chinese-American heritage and the Latin-American community he became closely involved with, Wong’s unapologetically political paintings and sculptures make this exhibition a perfect companion piece to Saatchi Gallery’s Beyond the Streets London, with his countercultural depiction of the 70s, 80s and 90s depicting communities on the margins being displaced by gentrification, as well as queer existence within both East and West coast Chinatowns. An antidote to the reactionary discourse frequently found in late 20th Century American art, Martin Wong’s Malicious Mischief of this exhibition’s title is aimed squarely at the political and cultural establishment of the time, uncompromisingly challenging it and pushing for a more accepting society.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief is showing at Camden Arts Centre from 16th June until 17th September.

‍‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
24/01/2023
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London in 2023
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing this year in the capital

The Rossettis at Tate Britain

Lady Affixing Pennant to a Knight’s Spear, Elizabeth Siddal, 1856

The Tate’s first retrospective of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the largest exhibition of his artworks in two decades, The Rossettis tracks the boundary-pushing careers of the Rossetti generation, not just of Dante Gabriel, but also of Christina and Elizabeth (née Siddal). From the Pre-Raphaelites and beyond, the works on display track the development of one of art history’s most influential families, not just in form but in their revolutionary countercultural depictions of life, romance and interpersonal relationships. More than just displaying artworks, The Rossettis utilises photography, design and spoken poetry to create a truly immersive investigation in the lives of the family and the various myths surrounding them. (Incidentally, an investigation into Christina Rossetti’s poetry couldn’t be better-timed; an appraisal of The Goblin Market (1859) comes on the back of ‘goblin mode’ being voted the Oxford word of the year). Perhaps most excitingly, however, is that the exhibition stands as the most comprehensive display of Elizabeth Siddal’s work in 30 years; as a self-taught working class artist, her art was frequently overshadowed by tragically early death and mythologising as a muse for John Everett Millais’ Ophelia. For her to be celebrated as an artist in her own right in such a major London exhibition is undoubtedly deserved and long-overdue.

The Rossettis is showing at Tate Britain from 6th April until 24th September.

Beyond the Streets London at Saatchi Gallery

Lil Crazy Legs, Martha Cooper, 1983

Featuring over 150 international artists and coming after previous blockbuster exhibitions in Los Angeles in 2018 and New York in 2019, Beyond the Streets London marks the first time in eight years that a show has occupied the entirety of Saatchi Gallery. Through original artworks, photography, site-specific installations and ephemera, the exhibition pays homage to the history of street art through the artists of graffiti, street art, hip-hop and punk rock. With cultural attitudes towards street art shifting significantly over the years, the medium’s narrative traces underground art and counterculture, challenging both authority and preconceived notions of where art can spring from. Curator and graffiti historian Roger Gastman notes that “The story of graffiti and street art can’t be told without highlighting the significant role London, and the UK in general played in revolutionising these cultures and continuing to spread the word of their existence”, marking the significance of the exhibition making its way to the capital.

Beyond the Streets London is showing at Saatchi Gallery from 17th February until 9th May.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art at The National Gallery

Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses), Paul Cézanne, c. 1894–1905

Made up of loans from museums and private collections around the world and boasting works by such names as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Rodin, Picasso, Matisse, Klimt, Kandinsky, Mondrian and more, After Impressionism traces the giants of European art through the late 19th and early 20th centuries. While the exhibitions celebrated Paris as the artistic capital of the continent at the time, The National Gallery will also display works from Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Vienna and Barcelona showcasing the formation of various different modernist movements such as Expressionism, Cubism and Abstraction. As European society crept towards the First World War, social and political instability led artists to break with tradition, questioning and experimenting with the very form of art. More than just displaying the works, however, the exhibition will invite viewers to consider modernist separation with conventional depictions of the external world, giving rise to more expressive and conceptual depictions of subjects, stories and emotions. Displaying artworks by some of the most influential figures in the Western art world, After Impressionism stands as a must-visit for anyone interested in art history, or tracing the style and influences of their favourite contemporary artists.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art is showing at The National Gallery from 25th March until 13th August.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief at Camden Arts Centre

Tell My Troubles to the Eight Ball (Eureka), Martin Wong, 1978-81

Drawing inspiration from such myriad sources as graffiti, urban poetry, Chinese iconography, carceral aesthetics and sign language, the work of Martin Wong (1946-1999) remains just as vital and energising as when it was created. Inspired equally by his Chinese-American heritage and the Latin-American community he became closely involved with, Wong’s unapologetically political paintings and sculptures make this exhibition a perfect companion piece to Saatchi Gallery’s Beyond the Streets London, with his countercultural depiction of the 70s, 80s and 90s depicting communities on the margins being displaced by gentrification, as well as queer existence within both East and West coast Chinatowns. An antidote to the reactionary discourse frequently found in late 20th Century American art, Martin Wong’s Malicious Mischief of this exhibition’s title is aimed squarely at the political and cultural establishment of the time, uncompromisingly challenging it and pushing for a more accepting society.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief is showing at Camden Arts Centre from 16th June until 17th September.

‍‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
24/01/2023
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London in 2023
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing this year in the capital

The Rossettis at Tate Britain

Lady Affixing Pennant to a Knight’s Spear, Elizabeth Siddal, 1856

The Tate’s first retrospective of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the largest exhibition of his artworks in two decades, The Rossettis tracks the boundary-pushing careers of the Rossetti generation, not just of Dante Gabriel, but also of Christina and Elizabeth (née Siddal). From the Pre-Raphaelites and beyond, the works on display track the development of one of art history’s most influential families, not just in form but in their revolutionary countercultural depictions of life, romance and interpersonal relationships. More than just displaying artworks, The Rossettis utilises photography, design and spoken poetry to create a truly immersive investigation in the lives of the family and the various myths surrounding them. (Incidentally, an investigation into Christina Rossetti’s poetry couldn’t be better-timed; an appraisal of The Goblin Market (1859) comes on the back of ‘goblin mode’ being voted the Oxford word of the year). Perhaps most excitingly, however, is that the exhibition stands as the most comprehensive display of Elizabeth Siddal’s work in 30 years; as a self-taught working class artist, her art was frequently overshadowed by tragically early death and mythologising as a muse for John Everett Millais’ Ophelia. For her to be celebrated as an artist in her own right in such a major London exhibition is undoubtedly deserved and long-overdue.

The Rossettis is showing at Tate Britain from 6th April until 24th September.

Beyond the Streets London at Saatchi Gallery

Lil Crazy Legs, Martha Cooper, 1983

Featuring over 150 international artists and coming after previous blockbuster exhibitions in Los Angeles in 2018 and New York in 2019, Beyond the Streets London marks the first time in eight years that a show has occupied the entirety of Saatchi Gallery. Through original artworks, photography, site-specific installations and ephemera, the exhibition pays homage to the history of street art through the artists of graffiti, street art, hip-hop and punk rock. With cultural attitudes towards street art shifting significantly over the years, the medium’s narrative traces underground art and counterculture, challenging both authority and preconceived notions of where art can spring from. Curator and graffiti historian Roger Gastman notes that “The story of graffiti and street art can’t be told without highlighting the significant role London, and the UK in general played in revolutionising these cultures and continuing to spread the word of their existence”, marking the significance of the exhibition making its way to the capital.

Beyond the Streets London is showing at Saatchi Gallery from 17th February until 9th May.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art at The National Gallery

Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses), Paul Cézanne, c. 1894–1905

Made up of loans from museums and private collections around the world and boasting works by such names as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Rodin, Picasso, Matisse, Klimt, Kandinsky, Mondrian and more, After Impressionism traces the giants of European art through the late 19th and early 20th centuries. While the exhibitions celebrated Paris as the artistic capital of the continent at the time, The National Gallery will also display works from Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Vienna and Barcelona showcasing the formation of various different modernist movements such as Expressionism, Cubism and Abstraction. As European society crept towards the First World War, social and political instability led artists to break with tradition, questioning and experimenting with the very form of art. More than just displaying the works, however, the exhibition will invite viewers to consider modernist separation with conventional depictions of the external world, giving rise to more expressive and conceptual depictions of subjects, stories and emotions. Displaying artworks by some of the most influential figures in the Western art world, After Impressionism stands as a must-visit for anyone interested in art history, or tracing the style and influences of their favourite contemporary artists.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art is showing at The National Gallery from 25th March until 13th August.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief at Camden Arts Centre

Tell My Troubles to the Eight Ball (Eureka), Martin Wong, 1978-81

Drawing inspiration from such myriad sources as graffiti, urban poetry, Chinese iconography, carceral aesthetics and sign language, the work of Martin Wong (1946-1999) remains just as vital and energising as when it was created. Inspired equally by his Chinese-American heritage and the Latin-American community he became closely involved with, Wong’s unapologetically political paintings and sculptures make this exhibition a perfect companion piece to Saatchi Gallery’s Beyond the Streets London, with his countercultural depiction of the 70s, 80s and 90s depicting communities on the margins being displaced by gentrification, as well as queer existence within both East and West coast Chinatowns. An antidote to the reactionary discourse frequently found in late 20th Century American art, Martin Wong’s Malicious Mischief of this exhibition’s title is aimed squarely at the political and cultural establishment of the time, uncompromisingly challenging it and pushing for a more accepting society.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief is showing at Camden Arts Centre from 16th June until 17th September.

‍‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
24/01/2023
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London in 2023

The Rossettis at Tate Britain

Lady Affixing Pennant to a Knight’s Spear, Elizabeth Siddal, 1856

The Tate’s first retrospective of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the largest exhibition of his artworks in two decades, The Rossettis tracks the boundary-pushing careers of the Rossetti generation, not just of Dante Gabriel, but also of Christina and Elizabeth (née Siddal). From the Pre-Raphaelites and beyond, the works on display track the development of one of art history’s most influential families, not just in form but in their revolutionary countercultural depictions of life, romance and interpersonal relationships. More than just displaying artworks, The Rossettis utilises photography, design and spoken poetry to create a truly immersive investigation in the lives of the family and the various myths surrounding them. (Incidentally, an investigation into Christina Rossetti’s poetry couldn’t be better-timed; an appraisal of The Goblin Market (1859) comes on the back of ‘goblin mode’ being voted the Oxford word of the year). Perhaps most excitingly, however, is that the exhibition stands as the most comprehensive display of Elizabeth Siddal’s work in 30 years; as a self-taught working class artist, her art was frequently overshadowed by tragically early death and mythologising as a muse for John Everett Millais’ Ophelia. For her to be celebrated as an artist in her own right in such a major London exhibition is undoubtedly deserved and long-overdue.

The Rossettis is showing at Tate Britain from 6th April until 24th September.

Beyond the Streets London at Saatchi Gallery

Lil Crazy Legs, Martha Cooper, 1983

Featuring over 150 international artists and coming after previous blockbuster exhibitions in Los Angeles in 2018 and New York in 2019, Beyond the Streets London marks the first time in eight years that a show has occupied the entirety of Saatchi Gallery. Through original artworks, photography, site-specific installations and ephemera, the exhibition pays homage to the history of street art through the artists of graffiti, street art, hip-hop and punk rock. With cultural attitudes towards street art shifting significantly over the years, the medium’s narrative traces underground art and counterculture, challenging both authority and preconceived notions of where art can spring from. Curator and graffiti historian Roger Gastman notes that “The story of graffiti and street art can’t be told without highlighting the significant role London, and the UK in general played in revolutionising these cultures and continuing to spread the word of their existence”, marking the significance of the exhibition making its way to the capital.

Beyond the Streets London is showing at Saatchi Gallery from 17th February until 9th May.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art at The National Gallery

Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses), Paul Cézanne, c. 1894–1905

Made up of loans from museums and private collections around the world and boasting works by such names as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Rodin, Picasso, Matisse, Klimt, Kandinsky, Mondrian and more, After Impressionism traces the giants of European art through the late 19th and early 20th centuries. While the exhibitions celebrated Paris as the artistic capital of the continent at the time, The National Gallery will also display works from Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Vienna and Barcelona showcasing the formation of various different modernist movements such as Expressionism, Cubism and Abstraction. As European society crept towards the First World War, social and political instability led artists to break with tradition, questioning and experimenting with the very form of art. More than just displaying the works, however, the exhibition will invite viewers to consider modernist separation with conventional depictions of the external world, giving rise to more expressive and conceptual depictions of subjects, stories and emotions. Displaying artworks by some of the most influential figures in the Western art world, After Impressionism stands as a must-visit for anyone interested in art history, or tracing the style and influences of their favourite contemporary artists.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art is showing at The National Gallery from 25th March until 13th August.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief at Camden Arts Centre

Tell My Troubles to the Eight Ball (Eureka), Martin Wong, 1978-81

Drawing inspiration from such myriad sources as graffiti, urban poetry, Chinese iconography, carceral aesthetics and sign language, the work of Martin Wong (1946-1999) remains just as vital and energising as when it was created. Inspired equally by his Chinese-American heritage and the Latin-American community he became closely involved with, Wong’s unapologetically political paintings and sculptures make this exhibition a perfect companion piece to Saatchi Gallery’s Beyond the Streets London, with his countercultural depiction of the 70s, 80s and 90s depicting communities on the margins being displaced by gentrification, as well as queer existence within both East and West coast Chinatowns. An antidote to the reactionary discourse frequently found in late 20th Century American art, Martin Wong’s Malicious Mischief of this exhibition’s title is aimed squarely at the political and cultural establishment of the time, uncompromisingly challenging it and pushing for a more accepting society.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief is showing at Camden Arts Centre from 16th June until 17th September.

‍‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
24/01/2023
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London in 2023
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing this year in the capital

The Rossettis at Tate Britain

Lady Affixing Pennant to a Knight’s Spear, Elizabeth Siddal, 1856

The Tate’s first retrospective of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the largest exhibition of his artworks in two decades, The Rossettis tracks the boundary-pushing careers of the Rossetti generation, not just of Dante Gabriel, but also of Christina and Elizabeth (née Siddal). From the Pre-Raphaelites and beyond, the works on display track the development of one of art history’s most influential families, not just in form but in their revolutionary countercultural depictions of life, romance and interpersonal relationships. More than just displaying artworks, The Rossettis utilises photography, design and spoken poetry to create a truly immersive investigation in the lives of the family and the various myths surrounding them. (Incidentally, an investigation into Christina Rossetti’s poetry couldn’t be better-timed; an appraisal of The Goblin Market (1859) comes on the back of ‘goblin mode’ being voted the Oxford word of the year). Perhaps most excitingly, however, is that the exhibition stands as the most comprehensive display of Elizabeth Siddal’s work in 30 years; as a self-taught working class artist, her art was frequently overshadowed by tragically early death and mythologising as a muse for John Everett Millais’ Ophelia. For her to be celebrated as an artist in her own right in such a major London exhibition is undoubtedly deserved and long-overdue.

The Rossettis is showing at Tate Britain from 6th April until 24th September.

Beyond the Streets London at Saatchi Gallery

Lil Crazy Legs, Martha Cooper, 1983

Featuring over 150 international artists and coming after previous blockbuster exhibitions in Los Angeles in 2018 and New York in 2019, Beyond the Streets London marks the first time in eight years that a show has occupied the entirety of Saatchi Gallery. Through original artworks, photography, site-specific installations and ephemera, the exhibition pays homage to the history of street art through the artists of graffiti, street art, hip-hop and punk rock. With cultural attitudes towards street art shifting significantly over the years, the medium’s narrative traces underground art and counterculture, challenging both authority and preconceived notions of where art can spring from. Curator and graffiti historian Roger Gastman notes that “The story of graffiti and street art can’t be told without highlighting the significant role London, and the UK in general played in revolutionising these cultures and continuing to spread the word of their existence”, marking the significance of the exhibition making its way to the capital.

Beyond the Streets London is showing at Saatchi Gallery from 17th February until 9th May.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art at The National Gallery

Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses), Paul Cézanne, c. 1894–1905

Made up of loans from museums and private collections around the world and boasting works by such names as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Rodin, Picasso, Matisse, Klimt, Kandinsky, Mondrian and more, After Impressionism traces the giants of European art through the late 19th and early 20th centuries. While the exhibitions celebrated Paris as the artistic capital of the continent at the time, The National Gallery will also display works from Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Vienna and Barcelona showcasing the formation of various different modernist movements such as Expressionism, Cubism and Abstraction. As European society crept towards the First World War, social and political instability led artists to break with tradition, questioning and experimenting with the very form of art. More than just displaying the works, however, the exhibition will invite viewers to consider modernist separation with conventional depictions of the external world, giving rise to more expressive and conceptual depictions of subjects, stories and emotions. Displaying artworks by some of the most influential figures in the Western art world, After Impressionism stands as a must-visit for anyone interested in art history, or tracing the style and influences of their favourite contemporary artists.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art is showing at The National Gallery from 25th March until 13th August.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief at Camden Arts Centre

Tell My Troubles to the Eight Ball (Eureka), Martin Wong, 1978-81

Drawing inspiration from such myriad sources as graffiti, urban poetry, Chinese iconography, carceral aesthetics and sign language, the work of Martin Wong (1946-1999) remains just as vital and energising as when it was created. Inspired equally by his Chinese-American heritage and the Latin-American community he became closely involved with, Wong’s unapologetically political paintings and sculptures make this exhibition a perfect companion piece to Saatchi Gallery’s Beyond the Streets London, with his countercultural depiction of the 70s, 80s and 90s depicting communities on the margins being displaced by gentrification, as well as queer existence within both East and West coast Chinatowns. An antidote to the reactionary discourse frequently found in late 20th Century American art, Martin Wong’s Malicious Mischief of this exhibition’s title is aimed squarely at the political and cultural establishment of the time, uncompromisingly challenging it and pushing for a more accepting society.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief is showing at Camden Arts Centre from 16th June until 17th September.

‍‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
24/01/2023
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London in 2023
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing this year in the capital

The Rossettis at Tate Britain

Lady Affixing Pennant to a Knight’s Spear, Elizabeth Siddal, 1856

The Tate’s first retrospective of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the largest exhibition of his artworks in two decades, The Rossettis tracks the boundary-pushing careers of the Rossetti generation, not just of Dante Gabriel, but also of Christina and Elizabeth (née Siddal). From the Pre-Raphaelites and beyond, the works on display track the development of one of art history’s most influential families, not just in form but in their revolutionary countercultural depictions of life, romance and interpersonal relationships. More than just displaying artworks, The Rossettis utilises photography, design and spoken poetry to create a truly immersive investigation in the lives of the family and the various myths surrounding them. (Incidentally, an investigation into Christina Rossetti’s poetry couldn’t be better-timed; an appraisal of The Goblin Market (1859) comes on the back of ‘goblin mode’ being voted the Oxford word of the year). Perhaps most excitingly, however, is that the exhibition stands as the most comprehensive display of Elizabeth Siddal’s work in 30 years; as a self-taught working class artist, her art was frequently overshadowed by tragically early death and mythologising as a muse for John Everett Millais’ Ophelia. For her to be celebrated as an artist in her own right in such a major London exhibition is undoubtedly deserved and long-overdue.

The Rossettis is showing at Tate Britain from 6th April until 24th September.

Beyond the Streets London at Saatchi Gallery

Lil Crazy Legs, Martha Cooper, 1983

Featuring over 150 international artists and coming after previous blockbuster exhibitions in Los Angeles in 2018 and New York in 2019, Beyond the Streets London marks the first time in eight years that a show has occupied the entirety of Saatchi Gallery. Through original artworks, photography, site-specific installations and ephemera, the exhibition pays homage to the history of street art through the artists of graffiti, street art, hip-hop and punk rock. With cultural attitudes towards street art shifting significantly over the years, the medium’s narrative traces underground art and counterculture, challenging both authority and preconceived notions of where art can spring from. Curator and graffiti historian Roger Gastman notes that “The story of graffiti and street art can’t be told without highlighting the significant role London, and the UK in general played in revolutionising these cultures and continuing to spread the word of their existence”, marking the significance of the exhibition making its way to the capital.

Beyond the Streets London is showing at Saatchi Gallery from 17th February until 9th May.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art at The National Gallery

Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses), Paul Cézanne, c. 1894–1905

Made up of loans from museums and private collections around the world and boasting works by such names as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Rodin, Picasso, Matisse, Klimt, Kandinsky, Mondrian and more, After Impressionism traces the giants of European art through the late 19th and early 20th centuries. While the exhibitions celebrated Paris as the artistic capital of the continent at the time, The National Gallery will also display works from Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Vienna and Barcelona showcasing the formation of various different modernist movements such as Expressionism, Cubism and Abstraction. As European society crept towards the First World War, social and political instability led artists to break with tradition, questioning and experimenting with the very form of art. More than just displaying the works, however, the exhibition will invite viewers to consider modernist separation with conventional depictions of the external world, giving rise to more expressive and conceptual depictions of subjects, stories and emotions. Displaying artworks by some of the most influential figures in the Western art world, After Impressionism stands as a must-visit for anyone interested in art history, or tracing the style and influences of their favourite contemporary artists.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art is showing at The National Gallery from 25th March until 13th August.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief at Camden Arts Centre

Tell My Troubles to the Eight Ball (Eureka), Martin Wong, 1978-81

Drawing inspiration from such myriad sources as graffiti, urban poetry, Chinese iconography, carceral aesthetics and sign language, the work of Martin Wong (1946-1999) remains just as vital and energising as when it was created. Inspired equally by his Chinese-American heritage and the Latin-American community he became closely involved with, Wong’s unapologetically political paintings and sculptures make this exhibition a perfect companion piece to Saatchi Gallery’s Beyond the Streets London, with his countercultural depiction of the 70s, 80s and 90s depicting communities on the margins being displaced by gentrification, as well as queer existence within both East and West coast Chinatowns. An antidote to the reactionary discourse frequently found in late 20th Century American art, Martin Wong’s Malicious Mischief of this exhibition’s title is aimed squarely at the political and cultural establishment of the time, uncompromisingly challenging it and pushing for a more accepting society.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief is showing at Camden Arts Centre from 16th June until 17th September.

‍‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
24/01/2023
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London in 2023
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing this year in the capital

The Rossettis at Tate Britain

Lady Affixing Pennant to a Knight’s Spear, Elizabeth Siddal, 1856

The Tate’s first retrospective of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the largest exhibition of his artworks in two decades, The Rossettis tracks the boundary-pushing careers of the Rossetti generation, not just of Dante Gabriel, but also of Christina and Elizabeth (née Siddal). From the Pre-Raphaelites and beyond, the works on display track the development of one of art history’s most influential families, not just in form but in their revolutionary countercultural depictions of life, romance and interpersonal relationships. More than just displaying artworks, The Rossettis utilises photography, design and spoken poetry to create a truly immersive investigation in the lives of the family and the various myths surrounding them. (Incidentally, an investigation into Christina Rossetti’s poetry couldn’t be better-timed; an appraisal of The Goblin Market (1859) comes on the back of ‘goblin mode’ being voted the Oxford word of the year). Perhaps most excitingly, however, is that the exhibition stands as the most comprehensive display of Elizabeth Siddal’s work in 30 years; as a self-taught working class artist, her art was frequently overshadowed by tragically early death and mythologising as a muse for John Everett Millais’ Ophelia. For her to be celebrated as an artist in her own right in such a major London exhibition is undoubtedly deserved and long-overdue.

The Rossettis is showing at Tate Britain from 6th April until 24th September.

Beyond the Streets London at Saatchi Gallery

Lil Crazy Legs, Martha Cooper, 1983

Featuring over 150 international artists and coming after previous blockbuster exhibitions in Los Angeles in 2018 and New York in 2019, Beyond the Streets London marks the first time in eight years that a show has occupied the entirety of Saatchi Gallery. Through original artworks, photography, site-specific installations and ephemera, the exhibition pays homage to the history of street art through the artists of graffiti, street art, hip-hop and punk rock. With cultural attitudes towards street art shifting significantly over the years, the medium’s narrative traces underground art and counterculture, challenging both authority and preconceived notions of where art can spring from. Curator and graffiti historian Roger Gastman notes that “The story of graffiti and street art can’t be told without highlighting the significant role London, and the UK in general played in revolutionising these cultures and continuing to spread the word of their existence”, marking the significance of the exhibition making its way to the capital.

Beyond the Streets London is showing at Saatchi Gallery from 17th February until 9th May.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art at The National Gallery

Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses), Paul Cézanne, c. 1894–1905

Made up of loans from museums and private collections around the world and boasting works by such names as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Rodin, Picasso, Matisse, Klimt, Kandinsky, Mondrian and more, After Impressionism traces the giants of European art through the late 19th and early 20th centuries. While the exhibitions celebrated Paris as the artistic capital of the continent at the time, The National Gallery will also display works from Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Vienna and Barcelona showcasing the formation of various different modernist movements such as Expressionism, Cubism and Abstraction. As European society crept towards the First World War, social and political instability led artists to break with tradition, questioning and experimenting with the very form of art. More than just displaying the works, however, the exhibition will invite viewers to consider modernist separation with conventional depictions of the external world, giving rise to more expressive and conceptual depictions of subjects, stories and emotions. Displaying artworks by some of the most influential figures in the Western art world, After Impressionism stands as a must-visit for anyone interested in art history, or tracing the style and influences of their favourite contemporary artists.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art is showing at The National Gallery from 25th March until 13th August.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief at Camden Arts Centre

Tell My Troubles to the Eight Ball (Eureka), Martin Wong, 1978-81

Drawing inspiration from such myriad sources as graffiti, urban poetry, Chinese iconography, carceral aesthetics and sign language, the work of Martin Wong (1946-1999) remains just as vital and energising as when it was created. Inspired equally by his Chinese-American heritage and the Latin-American community he became closely involved with, Wong’s unapologetically political paintings and sculptures make this exhibition a perfect companion piece to Saatchi Gallery’s Beyond the Streets London, with his countercultural depiction of the 70s, 80s and 90s depicting communities on the margins being displaced by gentrification, as well as queer existence within both East and West coast Chinatowns. An antidote to the reactionary discourse frequently found in late 20th Century American art, Martin Wong’s Malicious Mischief of this exhibition’s title is aimed squarely at the political and cultural establishment of the time, uncompromisingly challenging it and pushing for a more accepting society.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief is showing at Camden Arts Centre from 16th June until 17th September.

‍‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
24/01/2023
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London in 2023
Our picks for the best exhibitions showing this year in the capital

The Rossettis at Tate Britain

Lady Affixing Pennant to a Knight’s Spear, Elizabeth Siddal, 1856

The Tate’s first retrospective of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the largest exhibition of his artworks in two decades, The Rossettis tracks the boundary-pushing careers of the Rossetti generation, not just of Dante Gabriel, but also of Christina and Elizabeth (née Siddal). From the Pre-Raphaelites and beyond, the works on display track the development of one of art history’s most influential families, not just in form but in their revolutionary countercultural depictions of life, romance and interpersonal relationships. More than just displaying artworks, The Rossettis utilises photography, design and spoken poetry to create a truly immersive investigation in the lives of the family and the various myths surrounding them. (Incidentally, an investigation into Christina Rossetti’s poetry couldn’t be better-timed; an appraisal of The Goblin Market (1859) comes on the back of ‘goblin mode’ being voted the Oxford word of the year). Perhaps most excitingly, however, is that the exhibition stands as the most comprehensive display of Elizabeth Siddal’s work in 30 years; as a self-taught working class artist, her art was frequently overshadowed by tragically early death and mythologising as a muse for John Everett Millais’ Ophelia. For her to be celebrated as an artist in her own right in such a major London exhibition is undoubtedly deserved and long-overdue.

The Rossettis is showing at Tate Britain from 6th April until 24th September.

Beyond the Streets London at Saatchi Gallery

Lil Crazy Legs, Martha Cooper, 1983

Featuring over 150 international artists and coming after previous blockbuster exhibitions in Los Angeles in 2018 and New York in 2019, Beyond the Streets London marks the first time in eight years that a show has occupied the entirety of Saatchi Gallery. Through original artworks, photography, site-specific installations and ephemera, the exhibition pays homage to the history of street art through the artists of graffiti, street art, hip-hop and punk rock. With cultural attitudes towards street art shifting significantly over the years, the medium’s narrative traces underground art and counterculture, challenging both authority and preconceived notions of where art can spring from. Curator and graffiti historian Roger Gastman notes that “The story of graffiti and street art can’t be told without highlighting the significant role London, and the UK in general played in revolutionising these cultures and continuing to spread the word of their existence”, marking the significance of the exhibition making its way to the capital.

Beyond the Streets London is showing at Saatchi Gallery from 17th February until 9th May.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art at The National Gallery

Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses), Paul Cézanne, c. 1894–1905

Made up of loans from museums and private collections around the world and boasting works by such names as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Rodin, Picasso, Matisse, Klimt, Kandinsky, Mondrian and more, After Impressionism traces the giants of European art through the late 19th and early 20th centuries. While the exhibitions celebrated Paris as the artistic capital of the continent at the time, The National Gallery will also display works from Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Vienna and Barcelona showcasing the formation of various different modernist movements such as Expressionism, Cubism and Abstraction. As European society crept towards the First World War, social and political instability led artists to break with tradition, questioning and experimenting with the very form of art. More than just displaying the works, however, the exhibition will invite viewers to consider modernist separation with conventional depictions of the external world, giving rise to more expressive and conceptual depictions of subjects, stories and emotions. Displaying artworks by some of the most influential figures in the Western art world, After Impressionism stands as a must-visit for anyone interested in art history, or tracing the style and influences of their favourite contemporary artists.

After Impressionism: Inventing Modern Art is showing at The National Gallery from 25th March until 13th August.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief at Camden Arts Centre

Tell My Troubles to the Eight Ball (Eureka), Martin Wong, 1978-81

Drawing inspiration from such myriad sources as graffiti, urban poetry, Chinese iconography, carceral aesthetics and sign language, the work of Martin Wong (1946-1999) remains just as vital and energising as when it was created. Inspired equally by his Chinese-American heritage and the Latin-American community he became closely involved with, Wong’s unapologetically political paintings and sculptures make this exhibition a perfect companion piece to Saatchi Gallery’s Beyond the Streets London, with his countercultural depiction of the 70s, 80s and 90s depicting communities on the margins being displaced by gentrification, as well as queer existence within both East and West coast Chinatowns. An antidote to the reactionary discourse frequently found in late 20th Century American art, Martin Wong’s Malicious Mischief of this exhibition’s title is aimed squarely at the political and cultural establishment of the time, uncompromisingly challenging it and pushing for a more accepting society.

Martin Wong: Malicious Mischief is showing at Camden Arts Centre from 16th June until 17th September.

‍‍Make sure to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with every exhibition you visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
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