12/11/2021
Artist Spotlight
Nathalie Brough
COP26: Our Favourite Artworks in Response to the Climate Crisis
So, what’s been the result of the climate talks?

Leaders, activists and indigenous peoples came together in Glasgow to set new goals for a better, cleaner future. So, what’s been the result of the climate talks? The past week saw desperate protests, speeches and innovative solutions ranging from central Paris going car-free to building eco-friendly 3D-printed homes in Texas. But with concerns that countries’ short-term goals are not enough to prevent significant temperature rises by the end of this century, it’s clear the fight is far from over.

COP26 recognises that we don’t just need scientists on board to present the truth about climate change, we need the power of art. “Science discovers, Art digests”, said producers 5x15 in the lead up to their panel discussion hosted by Brian Eno on the final day of the summit, in which artists and performers will explore the role of art in response to climate change. The special event features the likes of multimedia artist Carolina Caycedo, science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson and fantasy writer Neil Gaiman, aiming to pave the way for creatives to drive change through art. In light of this ethos, we take a glance at some of our favourite artworks that have emerged in Glasgow and beyond over the current few weeks.


First up is Jenny Holzer’s HURT EARTH; colossallight projections on the facade of the Tate Modern as well as a number of Glaswegian landmarks, quoting Greta Thunberg’s “If not now, then when?” among other prolific environmental activists.

HURT EARTH, 2021 Light projection Tate Modern, London

Wayne Binitie’s glass capsule of Antarctic air from 1765 is another of our favourites. Five years of research in collaboration with scientists of the British Antarctic Survey allowed Binitie to be able to capture the purest form of air that was trapped inside polar ice since before the Industrial Revolution.

Artist Wayne Binitie with his glass sculpture containing air from the year 1765. Photograph: Jane Barlow

This sculpture of Clarion the Polar Bear, which artist Bamber Hawes carried from Shropshire to Glasgow, captured the attention of many. Along the way, the artist was accompanied by supporters and strangers alike who all shared the same passion for the urgent need to take action against climate change.

Clarion the Polar Bear by Bamber Hawes. Picture: Andrew Fusek Peters

And, last but not least, are the street murals made by Children in Glasgow; an impactful reminder of the acute awareness that younger generations have of the dangers that will be presented to them if we do not act now.

A shark, bluebell and dragonfly feature in the Glasgow mural
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
12/11/2021
Artist Spotlight
Nathalie Brough
COP26: Our Favourite Artworks in Response to the Climate Crisis
So, what’s been the result of the climate talks?

Leaders, activists and indigenous peoples came together in Glasgow to set new goals for a better, cleaner future. So, what’s been the result of the climate talks? The past week saw desperate protests, speeches and innovative solutions ranging from central Paris going car-free to building eco-friendly 3D-printed homes in Texas. But with concerns that countries’ short-term goals are not enough to prevent significant temperature rises by the end of this century, it’s clear the fight is far from over.

COP26 recognises that we don’t just need scientists on board to present the truth about climate change, we need the power of art. “Science discovers, Art digests”, said producers 5x15 in the lead up to their panel discussion hosted by Brian Eno on the final day of the summit, in which artists and performers will explore the role of art in response to climate change. The special event features the likes of multimedia artist Carolina Caycedo, science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson and fantasy writer Neil Gaiman, aiming to pave the way for creatives to drive change through art. In light of this ethos, we take a glance at some of our favourite artworks that have emerged in Glasgow and beyond over the current few weeks.


First up is Jenny Holzer’s HURT EARTH; colossallight projections on the facade of the Tate Modern as well as a number of Glaswegian landmarks, quoting Greta Thunberg’s “If not now, then when?” among other prolific environmental activists.

HURT EARTH, 2021 Light projection Tate Modern, London

Wayne Binitie’s glass capsule of Antarctic air from 1765 is another of our favourites. Five years of research in collaboration with scientists of the British Antarctic Survey allowed Binitie to be able to capture the purest form of air that was trapped inside polar ice since before the Industrial Revolution.

Artist Wayne Binitie with his glass sculpture containing air from the year 1765. Photograph: Jane Barlow

This sculpture of Clarion the Polar Bear, which artist Bamber Hawes carried from Shropshire to Glasgow, captured the attention of many. Along the way, the artist was accompanied by supporters and strangers alike who all shared the same passion for the urgent need to take action against climate change.

Clarion the Polar Bear by Bamber Hawes. Picture: Andrew Fusek Peters

And, last but not least, are the street murals made by Children in Glasgow; an impactful reminder of the acute awareness that younger generations have of the dangers that will be presented to them if we do not act now.

A shark, bluebell and dragonfly feature in the Glasgow mural
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
12/11/2021
Artist Spotlight
Nathalie Brough
COP26: Our Favourite Artworks in Response to the Climate Crisis
So, what’s been the result of the climate talks?

Leaders, activists and indigenous peoples came together in Glasgow to set new goals for a better, cleaner future. So, what’s been the result of the climate talks? The past week saw desperate protests, speeches and innovative solutions ranging from central Paris going car-free to building eco-friendly 3D-printed homes in Texas. But with concerns that countries’ short-term goals are not enough to prevent significant temperature rises by the end of this century, it’s clear the fight is far from over.

COP26 recognises that we don’t just need scientists on board to present the truth about climate change, we need the power of art. “Science discovers, Art digests”, said producers 5x15 in the lead up to their panel discussion hosted by Brian Eno on the final day of the summit, in which artists and performers will explore the role of art in response to climate change. The special event features the likes of multimedia artist Carolina Caycedo, science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson and fantasy writer Neil Gaiman, aiming to pave the way for creatives to drive change through art. In light of this ethos, we take a glance at some of our favourite artworks that have emerged in Glasgow and beyond over the current few weeks.


First up is Jenny Holzer’s HURT EARTH; colossallight projections on the facade of the Tate Modern as well as a number of Glaswegian landmarks, quoting Greta Thunberg’s “If not now, then when?” among other prolific environmental activists.

HURT EARTH, 2021 Light projection Tate Modern, London

Wayne Binitie’s glass capsule of Antarctic air from 1765 is another of our favourites. Five years of research in collaboration with scientists of the British Antarctic Survey allowed Binitie to be able to capture the purest form of air that was trapped inside polar ice since before the Industrial Revolution.

Artist Wayne Binitie with his glass sculpture containing air from the year 1765. Photograph: Jane Barlow

This sculpture of Clarion the Polar Bear, which artist Bamber Hawes carried from Shropshire to Glasgow, captured the attention of many. Along the way, the artist was accompanied by supporters and strangers alike who all shared the same passion for the urgent need to take action against climate change.

Clarion the Polar Bear by Bamber Hawes. Picture: Andrew Fusek Peters

And, last but not least, are the street murals made by Children in Glasgow; an impactful reminder of the acute awareness that younger generations have of the dangers that will be presented to them if we do not act now.

A shark, bluebell and dragonfly feature in the Glasgow mural
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
12/11/2021
Artist Spotlight
Nathalie Brough
COP26: Our Favourite Artworks in Response to the Climate Crisis
So, what’s been the result of the climate talks?

Leaders, activists and indigenous peoples came together in Glasgow to set new goals for a better, cleaner future. So, what’s been the result of the climate talks? The past week saw desperate protests, speeches and innovative solutions ranging from central Paris going car-free to building eco-friendly 3D-printed homes in Texas. But with concerns that countries’ short-term goals are not enough to prevent significant temperature rises by the end of this century, it’s clear the fight is far from over.

COP26 recognises that we don’t just need scientists on board to present the truth about climate change, we need the power of art. “Science discovers, Art digests”, said producers 5x15 in the lead up to their panel discussion hosted by Brian Eno on the final day of the summit, in which artists and performers will explore the role of art in response to climate change. The special event features the likes of multimedia artist Carolina Caycedo, science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson and fantasy writer Neil Gaiman, aiming to pave the way for creatives to drive change through art. In light of this ethos, we take a glance at some of our favourite artworks that have emerged in Glasgow and beyond over the current few weeks.


First up is Jenny Holzer’s HURT EARTH; colossallight projections on the facade of the Tate Modern as well as a number of Glaswegian landmarks, quoting Greta Thunberg’s “If not now, then when?” among other prolific environmental activists.

HURT EARTH, 2021 Light projection Tate Modern, London

Wayne Binitie’s glass capsule of Antarctic air from 1765 is another of our favourites. Five years of research in collaboration with scientists of the British Antarctic Survey allowed Binitie to be able to capture the purest form of air that was trapped inside polar ice since before the Industrial Revolution.

Artist Wayne Binitie with his glass sculpture containing air from the year 1765. Photograph: Jane Barlow

This sculpture of Clarion the Polar Bear, which artist Bamber Hawes carried from Shropshire to Glasgow, captured the attention of many. Along the way, the artist was accompanied by supporters and strangers alike who all shared the same passion for the urgent need to take action against climate change.

Clarion the Polar Bear by Bamber Hawes. Picture: Andrew Fusek Peters

And, last but not least, are the street murals made by Children in Glasgow; an impactful reminder of the acute awareness that younger generations have of the dangers that will be presented to them if we do not act now.

A shark, bluebell and dragonfly feature in the Glasgow mural
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
12/11/2021
Artist Spotlight
Nathalie Brough
COP26: Our Favourite Artworks in Response to the Climate Crisis
So, what’s been the result of the climate talks?

Leaders, activists and indigenous peoples came together in Glasgow to set new goals for a better, cleaner future. So, what’s been the result of the climate talks? The past week saw desperate protests, speeches and innovative solutions ranging from central Paris going car-free to building eco-friendly 3D-printed homes in Texas. But with concerns that countries’ short-term goals are not enough to prevent significant temperature rises by the end of this century, it’s clear the fight is far from over.

COP26 recognises that we don’t just need scientists on board to present the truth about climate change, we need the power of art. “Science discovers, Art digests”, said producers 5x15 in the lead up to their panel discussion hosted by Brian Eno on the final day of the summit, in which artists and performers will explore the role of art in response to climate change. The special event features the likes of multimedia artist Carolina Caycedo, science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson and fantasy writer Neil Gaiman, aiming to pave the way for creatives to drive change through art. In light of this ethos, we take a glance at some of our favourite artworks that have emerged in Glasgow and beyond over the current few weeks.


First up is Jenny Holzer’s HURT EARTH; colossallight projections on the facade of the Tate Modern as well as a number of Glaswegian landmarks, quoting Greta Thunberg’s “If not now, then when?” among other prolific environmental activists.

HURT EARTH, 2021 Light projection Tate Modern, London

Wayne Binitie’s glass capsule of Antarctic air from 1765 is another of our favourites. Five years of research in collaboration with scientists of the British Antarctic Survey allowed Binitie to be able to capture the purest form of air that was trapped inside polar ice since before the Industrial Revolution.

Artist Wayne Binitie with his glass sculpture containing air from the year 1765. Photograph: Jane Barlow

This sculpture of Clarion the Polar Bear, which artist Bamber Hawes carried from Shropshire to Glasgow, captured the attention of many. Along the way, the artist was accompanied by supporters and strangers alike who all shared the same passion for the urgent need to take action against climate change.

Clarion the Polar Bear by Bamber Hawes. Picture: Andrew Fusek Peters

And, last but not least, are the street murals made by Children in Glasgow; an impactful reminder of the acute awareness that younger generations have of the dangers that will be presented to them if we do not act now.

A shark, bluebell and dragonfly feature in the Glasgow mural
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
12/11/2021
Artist Spotlight
Nathalie Brough
COP26: Our Favourite Artworks in Response to the Climate Crisis

Leaders, activists and indigenous peoples came together in Glasgow to set new goals for a better, cleaner future. So, what’s been the result of the climate talks? The past week saw desperate protests, speeches and innovative solutions ranging from central Paris going car-free to building eco-friendly 3D-printed homes in Texas. But with concerns that countries’ short-term goals are not enough to prevent significant temperature rises by the end of this century, it’s clear the fight is far from over.

COP26 recognises that we don’t just need scientists on board to present the truth about climate change, we need the power of art. “Science discovers, Art digests”, said producers 5x15 in the lead up to their panel discussion hosted by Brian Eno on the final day of the summit, in which artists and performers will explore the role of art in response to climate change. The special event features the likes of multimedia artist Carolina Caycedo, science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson and fantasy writer Neil Gaiman, aiming to pave the way for creatives to drive change through art. In light of this ethos, we take a glance at some of our favourite artworks that have emerged in Glasgow and beyond over the current few weeks.


First up is Jenny Holzer’s HURT EARTH; colossallight projections on the facade of the Tate Modern as well as a number of Glaswegian landmarks, quoting Greta Thunberg’s “If not now, then when?” among other prolific environmental activists.

HURT EARTH, 2021 Light projection Tate Modern, London

Wayne Binitie’s glass capsule of Antarctic air from 1765 is another of our favourites. Five years of research in collaboration with scientists of the British Antarctic Survey allowed Binitie to be able to capture the purest form of air that was trapped inside polar ice since before the Industrial Revolution.

Artist Wayne Binitie with his glass sculpture containing air from the year 1765. Photograph: Jane Barlow

This sculpture of Clarion the Polar Bear, which artist Bamber Hawes carried from Shropshire to Glasgow, captured the attention of many. Along the way, the artist was accompanied by supporters and strangers alike who all shared the same passion for the urgent need to take action against climate change.

Clarion the Polar Bear by Bamber Hawes. Picture: Andrew Fusek Peters

And, last but not least, are the street murals made by Children in Glasgow; an impactful reminder of the acute awareness that younger generations have of the dangers that will be presented to them if we do not act now.

A shark, bluebell and dragonfly feature in the Glasgow mural
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
12/11/2021
Artist Spotlight
Nathalie Brough
COP26: Our Favourite Artworks in Response to the Climate Crisis
So, what’s been the result of the climate talks?

Leaders, activists and indigenous peoples came together in Glasgow to set new goals for a better, cleaner future. So, what’s been the result of the climate talks? The past week saw desperate protests, speeches and innovative solutions ranging from central Paris going car-free to building eco-friendly 3D-printed homes in Texas. But with concerns that countries’ short-term goals are not enough to prevent significant temperature rises by the end of this century, it’s clear the fight is far from over.

COP26 recognises that we don’t just need scientists on board to present the truth about climate change, we need the power of art. “Science discovers, Art digests”, said producers 5x15 in the lead up to their panel discussion hosted by Brian Eno on the final day of the summit, in which artists and performers will explore the role of art in response to climate change. The special event features the likes of multimedia artist Carolina Caycedo, science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson and fantasy writer Neil Gaiman, aiming to pave the way for creatives to drive change through art. In light of this ethos, we take a glance at some of our favourite artworks that have emerged in Glasgow and beyond over the current few weeks.


First up is Jenny Holzer’s HURT EARTH; colossallight projections on the facade of the Tate Modern as well as a number of Glaswegian landmarks, quoting Greta Thunberg’s “If not now, then when?” among other prolific environmental activists.

HURT EARTH, 2021 Light projection Tate Modern, London

Wayne Binitie’s glass capsule of Antarctic air from 1765 is another of our favourites. Five years of research in collaboration with scientists of the British Antarctic Survey allowed Binitie to be able to capture the purest form of air that was trapped inside polar ice since before the Industrial Revolution.

Artist Wayne Binitie with his glass sculpture containing air from the year 1765. Photograph: Jane Barlow

This sculpture of Clarion the Polar Bear, which artist Bamber Hawes carried from Shropshire to Glasgow, captured the attention of many. Along the way, the artist was accompanied by supporters and strangers alike who all shared the same passion for the urgent need to take action against climate change.

Clarion the Polar Bear by Bamber Hawes. Picture: Andrew Fusek Peters

And, last but not least, are the street murals made by Children in Glasgow; an impactful reminder of the acute awareness that younger generations have of the dangers that will be presented to them if we do not act now.

A shark, bluebell and dragonfly feature in the Glasgow mural
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
12/11/2021
Artist Spotlight
Nathalie Brough
COP26: Our Favourite Artworks in Response to the Climate Crisis
So, what’s been the result of the climate talks?

Leaders, activists and indigenous peoples came together in Glasgow to set new goals for a better, cleaner future. So, what’s been the result of the climate talks? The past week saw desperate protests, speeches and innovative solutions ranging from central Paris going car-free to building eco-friendly 3D-printed homes in Texas. But with concerns that countries’ short-term goals are not enough to prevent significant temperature rises by the end of this century, it’s clear the fight is far from over.

COP26 recognises that we don’t just need scientists on board to present the truth about climate change, we need the power of art. “Science discovers, Art digests”, said producers 5x15 in the lead up to their panel discussion hosted by Brian Eno on the final day of the summit, in which artists and performers will explore the role of art in response to climate change. The special event features the likes of multimedia artist Carolina Caycedo, science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson and fantasy writer Neil Gaiman, aiming to pave the way for creatives to drive change through art. In light of this ethos, we take a glance at some of our favourite artworks that have emerged in Glasgow and beyond over the current few weeks.


First up is Jenny Holzer’s HURT EARTH; colossallight projections on the facade of the Tate Modern as well as a number of Glaswegian landmarks, quoting Greta Thunberg’s “If not now, then when?” among other prolific environmental activists.

HURT EARTH, 2021 Light projection Tate Modern, London

Wayne Binitie’s glass capsule of Antarctic air from 1765 is another of our favourites. Five years of research in collaboration with scientists of the British Antarctic Survey allowed Binitie to be able to capture the purest form of air that was trapped inside polar ice since before the Industrial Revolution.

Artist Wayne Binitie with his glass sculpture containing air from the year 1765. Photograph: Jane Barlow

This sculpture of Clarion the Polar Bear, which artist Bamber Hawes carried from Shropshire to Glasgow, captured the attention of many. Along the way, the artist was accompanied by supporters and strangers alike who all shared the same passion for the urgent need to take action against climate change.

Clarion the Polar Bear by Bamber Hawes. Picture: Andrew Fusek Peters

And, last but not least, are the street murals made by Children in Glasgow; an impactful reminder of the acute awareness that younger generations have of the dangers that will be presented to them if we do not act now.

A shark, bluebell and dragonfly feature in the Glasgow mural
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
12/11/2021
Artist Spotlight
Nathalie Brough
COP26: Our Favourite Artworks in Response to the Climate Crisis
So, what’s been the result of the climate talks?

Leaders, activists and indigenous peoples came together in Glasgow to set new goals for a better, cleaner future. So, what’s been the result of the climate talks? The past week saw desperate protests, speeches and innovative solutions ranging from central Paris going car-free to building eco-friendly 3D-printed homes in Texas. But with concerns that countries’ short-term goals are not enough to prevent significant temperature rises by the end of this century, it’s clear the fight is far from over.

COP26 recognises that we don’t just need scientists on board to present the truth about climate change, we need the power of art. “Science discovers, Art digests”, said producers 5x15 in the lead up to their panel discussion hosted by Brian Eno on the final day of the summit, in which artists and performers will explore the role of art in response to climate change. The special event features the likes of multimedia artist Carolina Caycedo, science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson and fantasy writer Neil Gaiman, aiming to pave the way for creatives to drive change through art. In light of this ethos, we take a glance at some of our favourite artworks that have emerged in Glasgow and beyond over the current few weeks.


First up is Jenny Holzer’s HURT EARTH; colossallight projections on the facade of the Tate Modern as well as a number of Glaswegian landmarks, quoting Greta Thunberg’s “If not now, then when?” among other prolific environmental activists.

HURT EARTH, 2021 Light projection Tate Modern, London

Wayne Binitie’s glass capsule of Antarctic air from 1765 is another of our favourites. Five years of research in collaboration with scientists of the British Antarctic Survey allowed Binitie to be able to capture the purest form of air that was trapped inside polar ice since before the Industrial Revolution.

Artist Wayne Binitie with his glass sculpture containing air from the year 1765. Photograph: Jane Barlow

This sculpture of Clarion the Polar Bear, which artist Bamber Hawes carried from Shropshire to Glasgow, captured the attention of many. Along the way, the artist was accompanied by supporters and strangers alike who all shared the same passion for the urgent need to take action against climate change.

Clarion the Polar Bear by Bamber Hawes. Picture: Andrew Fusek Peters

And, last but not least, are the street murals made by Children in Glasgow; an impactful reminder of the acute awareness that younger generations have of the dangers that will be presented to them if we do not act now.

A shark, bluebell and dragonfly feature in the Glasgow mural
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
12/11/2021
Artist Spotlight
Nathalie Brough
COP26: Our Favourite Artworks in Response to the Climate Crisis
So, what’s been the result of the climate talks?

Leaders, activists and indigenous peoples came together in Glasgow to set new goals for a better, cleaner future. So, what’s been the result of the climate talks? The past week saw desperate protests, speeches and innovative solutions ranging from central Paris going car-free to building eco-friendly 3D-printed homes in Texas. But with concerns that countries’ short-term goals are not enough to prevent significant temperature rises by the end of this century, it’s clear the fight is far from over.

COP26 recognises that we don’t just need scientists on board to present the truth about climate change, we need the power of art. “Science discovers, Art digests”, said producers 5x15 in the lead up to their panel discussion hosted by Brian Eno on the final day of the summit, in which artists and performers will explore the role of art in response to climate change. The special event features the likes of multimedia artist Carolina Caycedo, science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson and fantasy writer Neil Gaiman, aiming to pave the way for creatives to drive change through art. In light of this ethos, we take a glance at some of our favourite artworks that have emerged in Glasgow and beyond over the current few weeks.


First up is Jenny Holzer’s HURT EARTH; colossallight projections on the facade of the Tate Modern as well as a number of Glaswegian landmarks, quoting Greta Thunberg’s “If not now, then when?” among other prolific environmental activists.

HURT EARTH, 2021 Light projection Tate Modern, London

Wayne Binitie’s glass capsule of Antarctic air from 1765 is another of our favourites. Five years of research in collaboration with scientists of the British Antarctic Survey allowed Binitie to be able to capture the purest form of air that was trapped inside polar ice since before the Industrial Revolution.

Artist Wayne Binitie with his glass sculpture containing air from the year 1765. Photograph: Jane Barlow

This sculpture of Clarion the Polar Bear, which artist Bamber Hawes carried from Shropshire to Glasgow, captured the attention of many. Along the way, the artist was accompanied by supporters and strangers alike who all shared the same passion for the urgent need to take action against climate change.

Clarion the Polar Bear by Bamber Hawes. Picture: Andrew Fusek Peters

And, last but not least, are the street murals made by Children in Glasgow; an impactful reminder of the acute awareness that younger generations have of the dangers that will be presented to them if we do not act now.

A shark, bluebell and dragonfly feature in the Glasgow mural
Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
Thanks For Reading
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