19/01/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Sculpting Solutions: Art to Combat Disability
Amputation is not a failure of treatment but an effective management strategy for certain life threatening conditions. However, that does not make it any less devastating to those who receive it as a prognosis. We take a look into the ways that creative minds and artists have transformed medical and clinical objects into opportunities for design and beauty.


Spare Parts at The Rag Factory, 2012 


Spare Parts was an exhibition that brought together a diverse and multifaceted group of artists all using pre-loved prosthetics as their drawing board. The exhibition was synthesised by the culmination of prosthetics that were donated by amputees and clinics from all over the globe. Although not officially partnered with The Olympic Games, the exhibition ran at the same time as the Paralympics in London, with founder Priscilla Sutton noting the awareness and positive conversation that paralympic athletes bring to the subject matter of prosthetic limbs.



This exhibition sought to use spare prosthetic limbs as the tool of creativity. However, as of late more and more artists see it as the product of creativity. 


John Powers


 John Powers, an artist trained in creating realistic bronze statues and abstract forms, had to face this life altering medical complication. In 2021, he sustained a traumatic and career-threatening injury that saw a power saw slice off a thumb and finger, and severely mangle two others. Powers has  said that art was the saving grace of his recovery, stating that “art has given me a way to look at this and take part in this.” Specifically, Powers sought to call on artists to create prosthetics which transcended function and provided avant garde and ornamental accessories for him to don at art openings. The first professional he called upon to create a prosthetic for him was Adam Poots, the founder of a tabletop board-game company. Poots’ design draws inspiration from a gauntlet prosthetic worn by a 16th century German Knight known as Götz of the Iron Hand. Powers has now launched a site, called Open Paw, which invites artists to submit designs. A future possibility is an exhibit of all submissions at Postmasters Gallery in New York. 





Sophie De Oliveira Barata 

 

Sophie de Oliveira Barata is a pioneer in the unique medium of artistic prosthetic creation. With a background in fine art and an early  job  creating prosthetics which allowed her to develop finely detailed model-making skills, she merged her multifaceted creativity and talent to found ‘The Alternative Limb Project’. This project explores the theme of body image, evolution, and modification using a combination of modern technology and traditional crafts. With her work aiming to promote a positive narrative around disability and to celebrate diversity, Barata makes about six limbs a year for a mostly private clientele. She works closely with her clients to ensure their personality is represented in their prosthetics, with no two works the same 




McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda 


Designers McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda launched Alleles Design Studio in 2013 after they noted the lack of design options for prosthetics. In the years since, they have been crafting stylish leg and arm covers that people can actually afford. The designer duo prioritise style and elegance in their designs, not creating for insurance companies or clinicians, but for those who need them. Their ambition was to create prosthetics that people want to don when hitting the town or hanging out with friends. 




This fairly new merge between functional prosthetic medicine and art is a medium to be celebrated. It is through these works that people who have suffered amputations or conditions that require prosthetics, are able to celebrate their individuality and differences in ways previously unavailable.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/01/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Sculpting Solutions: Art to Combat Disability
Amputation is not a failure of treatment but an effective management strategy for certain life threatening conditions. However, that does not make it any less devastating to those who receive it as a prognosis. We take a look into the ways that creative minds and artists have transformed medical and clinical objects into opportunities for design and beauty.


Spare Parts at The Rag Factory, 2012 


Spare Parts was an exhibition that brought together a diverse and multifaceted group of artists all using pre-loved prosthetics as their drawing board. The exhibition was synthesised by the culmination of prosthetics that were donated by amputees and clinics from all over the globe. Although not officially partnered with The Olympic Games, the exhibition ran at the same time as the Paralympics in London, with founder Priscilla Sutton noting the awareness and positive conversation that paralympic athletes bring to the subject matter of prosthetic limbs.



This exhibition sought to use spare prosthetic limbs as the tool of creativity. However, as of late more and more artists see it as the product of creativity. 


John Powers


 John Powers, an artist trained in creating realistic bronze statues and abstract forms, had to face this life altering medical complication. In 2021, he sustained a traumatic and career-threatening injury that saw a power saw slice off a thumb and finger, and severely mangle two others. Powers has  said that art was the saving grace of his recovery, stating that “art has given me a way to look at this and take part in this.” Specifically, Powers sought to call on artists to create prosthetics which transcended function and provided avant garde and ornamental accessories for him to don at art openings. The first professional he called upon to create a prosthetic for him was Adam Poots, the founder of a tabletop board-game company. Poots’ design draws inspiration from a gauntlet prosthetic worn by a 16th century German Knight known as Götz of the Iron Hand. Powers has now launched a site, called Open Paw, which invites artists to submit designs. A future possibility is an exhibit of all submissions at Postmasters Gallery in New York. 





Sophie De Oliveira Barata 

 

Sophie de Oliveira Barata is a pioneer in the unique medium of artistic prosthetic creation. With a background in fine art and an early  job  creating prosthetics which allowed her to develop finely detailed model-making skills, she merged her multifaceted creativity and talent to found ‘The Alternative Limb Project’. This project explores the theme of body image, evolution, and modification using a combination of modern technology and traditional crafts. With her work aiming to promote a positive narrative around disability and to celebrate diversity, Barata makes about six limbs a year for a mostly private clientele. She works closely with her clients to ensure their personality is represented in their prosthetics, with no two works the same 




McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda 


Designers McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda launched Alleles Design Studio in 2013 after they noted the lack of design options for prosthetics. In the years since, they have been crafting stylish leg and arm covers that people can actually afford. The designer duo prioritise style and elegance in their designs, not creating for insurance companies or clinicians, but for those who need them. Their ambition was to create prosthetics that people want to don when hitting the town or hanging out with friends. 




This fairly new merge between functional prosthetic medicine and art is a medium to be celebrated. It is through these works that people who have suffered amputations or conditions that require prosthetics, are able to celebrate their individuality and differences in ways previously unavailable.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/01/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Sculpting Solutions: Art to Combat Disability
Amputation is not a failure of treatment but an effective management strategy for certain life threatening conditions. However, that does not make it any less devastating to those who receive it as a prognosis. We take a look into the ways that creative minds and artists have transformed medical and clinical objects into opportunities for design and beauty.


Spare Parts at The Rag Factory, 2012 


Spare Parts was an exhibition that brought together a diverse and multifaceted group of artists all using pre-loved prosthetics as their drawing board. The exhibition was synthesised by the culmination of prosthetics that were donated by amputees and clinics from all over the globe. Although not officially partnered with The Olympic Games, the exhibition ran at the same time as the Paralympics in London, with founder Priscilla Sutton noting the awareness and positive conversation that paralympic athletes bring to the subject matter of prosthetic limbs.



This exhibition sought to use spare prosthetic limbs as the tool of creativity. However, as of late more and more artists see it as the product of creativity. 


John Powers


 John Powers, an artist trained in creating realistic bronze statues and abstract forms, had to face this life altering medical complication. In 2021, he sustained a traumatic and career-threatening injury that saw a power saw slice off a thumb and finger, and severely mangle two others. Powers has  said that art was the saving grace of his recovery, stating that “art has given me a way to look at this and take part in this.” Specifically, Powers sought to call on artists to create prosthetics which transcended function and provided avant garde and ornamental accessories for him to don at art openings. The first professional he called upon to create a prosthetic for him was Adam Poots, the founder of a tabletop board-game company. Poots’ design draws inspiration from a gauntlet prosthetic worn by a 16th century German Knight known as Götz of the Iron Hand. Powers has now launched a site, called Open Paw, which invites artists to submit designs. A future possibility is an exhibit of all submissions at Postmasters Gallery in New York. 





Sophie De Oliveira Barata 

 

Sophie de Oliveira Barata is a pioneer in the unique medium of artistic prosthetic creation. With a background in fine art and an early  job  creating prosthetics which allowed her to develop finely detailed model-making skills, she merged her multifaceted creativity and talent to found ‘The Alternative Limb Project’. This project explores the theme of body image, evolution, and modification using a combination of modern technology and traditional crafts. With her work aiming to promote a positive narrative around disability and to celebrate diversity, Barata makes about six limbs a year for a mostly private clientele. She works closely with her clients to ensure their personality is represented in their prosthetics, with no two works the same 




McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda 


Designers McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda launched Alleles Design Studio in 2013 after they noted the lack of design options for prosthetics. In the years since, they have been crafting stylish leg and arm covers that people can actually afford. The designer duo prioritise style and elegance in their designs, not creating for insurance companies or clinicians, but for those who need them. Their ambition was to create prosthetics that people want to don when hitting the town or hanging out with friends. 




This fairly new merge between functional prosthetic medicine and art is a medium to be celebrated. It is through these works that people who have suffered amputations or conditions that require prosthetics, are able to celebrate their individuality and differences in ways previously unavailable.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/01/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Sculpting Solutions: Art to Combat Disability
Amputation is not a failure of treatment but an effective management strategy for certain life threatening conditions. However, that does not make it any less devastating to those who receive it as a prognosis. We take a look into the ways that creative minds and artists have transformed medical and clinical objects into opportunities for design and beauty.


Spare Parts at The Rag Factory, 2012 


Spare Parts was an exhibition that brought together a diverse and multifaceted group of artists all using pre-loved prosthetics as their drawing board. The exhibition was synthesised by the culmination of prosthetics that were donated by amputees and clinics from all over the globe. Although not officially partnered with The Olympic Games, the exhibition ran at the same time as the Paralympics in London, with founder Priscilla Sutton noting the awareness and positive conversation that paralympic athletes bring to the subject matter of prosthetic limbs.



This exhibition sought to use spare prosthetic limbs as the tool of creativity. However, as of late more and more artists see it as the product of creativity. 


John Powers


 John Powers, an artist trained in creating realistic bronze statues and abstract forms, had to face this life altering medical complication. In 2021, he sustained a traumatic and career-threatening injury that saw a power saw slice off a thumb and finger, and severely mangle two others. Powers has  said that art was the saving grace of his recovery, stating that “art has given me a way to look at this and take part in this.” Specifically, Powers sought to call on artists to create prosthetics which transcended function and provided avant garde and ornamental accessories for him to don at art openings. The first professional he called upon to create a prosthetic for him was Adam Poots, the founder of a tabletop board-game company. Poots’ design draws inspiration from a gauntlet prosthetic worn by a 16th century German Knight known as Götz of the Iron Hand. Powers has now launched a site, called Open Paw, which invites artists to submit designs. A future possibility is an exhibit of all submissions at Postmasters Gallery in New York. 





Sophie De Oliveira Barata 

 

Sophie de Oliveira Barata is a pioneer in the unique medium of artistic prosthetic creation. With a background in fine art and an early  job  creating prosthetics which allowed her to develop finely detailed model-making skills, she merged her multifaceted creativity and talent to found ‘The Alternative Limb Project’. This project explores the theme of body image, evolution, and modification using a combination of modern technology and traditional crafts. With her work aiming to promote a positive narrative around disability and to celebrate diversity, Barata makes about six limbs a year for a mostly private clientele. She works closely with her clients to ensure their personality is represented in their prosthetics, with no two works the same 




McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda 


Designers McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda launched Alleles Design Studio in 2013 after they noted the lack of design options for prosthetics. In the years since, they have been crafting stylish leg and arm covers that people can actually afford. The designer duo prioritise style and elegance in their designs, not creating for insurance companies or clinicians, but for those who need them. Their ambition was to create prosthetics that people want to don when hitting the town or hanging out with friends. 




This fairly new merge between functional prosthetic medicine and art is a medium to be celebrated. It is through these works that people who have suffered amputations or conditions that require prosthetics, are able to celebrate their individuality and differences in ways previously unavailable.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/01/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Sculpting Solutions: Art to Combat Disability
Amputation is not a failure of treatment but an effective management strategy for certain life threatening conditions. However, that does not make it any less devastating to those who receive it as a prognosis. We take a look into the ways that creative minds and artists have transformed medical and clinical objects into opportunities for design and beauty.


Spare Parts at The Rag Factory, 2012 


Spare Parts was an exhibition that brought together a diverse and multifaceted group of artists all using pre-loved prosthetics as their drawing board. The exhibition was synthesised by the culmination of prosthetics that were donated by amputees and clinics from all over the globe. Although not officially partnered with The Olympic Games, the exhibition ran at the same time as the Paralympics in London, with founder Priscilla Sutton noting the awareness and positive conversation that paralympic athletes bring to the subject matter of prosthetic limbs.



This exhibition sought to use spare prosthetic limbs as the tool of creativity. However, as of late more and more artists see it as the product of creativity. 


John Powers


 John Powers, an artist trained in creating realistic bronze statues and abstract forms, had to face this life altering medical complication. In 2021, he sustained a traumatic and career-threatening injury that saw a power saw slice off a thumb and finger, and severely mangle two others. Powers has  said that art was the saving grace of his recovery, stating that “art has given me a way to look at this and take part in this.” Specifically, Powers sought to call on artists to create prosthetics which transcended function and provided avant garde and ornamental accessories for him to don at art openings. The first professional he called upon to create a prosthetic for him was Adam Poots, the founder of a tabletop board-game company. Poots’ design draws inspiration from a gauntlet prosthetic worn by a 16th century German Knight known as Götz of the Iron Hand. Powers has now launched a site, called Open Paw, which invites artists to submit designs. A future possibility is an exhibit of all submissions at Postmasters Gallery in New York. 





Sophie De Oliveira Barata 

 

Sophie de Oliveira Barata is a pioneer in the unique medium of artistic prosthetic creation. With a background in fine art and an early  job  creating prosthetics which allowed her to develop finely detailed model-making skills, she merged her multifaceted creativity and talent to found ‘The Alternative Limb Project’. This project explores the theme of body image, evolution, and modification using a combination of modern technology and traditional crafts. With her work aiming to promote a positive narrative around disability and to celebrate diversity, Barata makes about six limbs a year for a mostly private clientele. She works closely with her clients to ensure their personality is represented in their prosthetics, with no two works the same 




McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda 


Designers McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda launched Alleles Design Studio in 2013 after they noted the lack of design options for prosthetics. In the years since, they have been crafting stylish leg and arm covers that people can actually afford. The designer duo prioritise style and elegance in their designs, not creating for insurance companies or clinicians, but for those who need them. Their ambition was to create prosthetics that people want to don when hitting the town or hanging out with friends. 




This fairly new merge between functional prosthetic medicine and art is a medium to be celebrated. It is through these works that people who have suffered amputations or conditions that require prosthetics, are able to celebrate their individuality and differences in ways previously unavailable.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/01/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Sculpting Solutions: Art to Combat Disability


Spare Parts at The Rag Factory, 2012 


Spare Parts was an exhibition that brought together a diverse and multifaceted group of artists all using pre-loved prosthetics as their drawing board. The exhibition was synthesised by the culmination of prosthetics that were donated by amputees and clinics from all over the globe. Although not officially partnered with The Olympic Games, the exhibition ran at the same time as the Paralympics in London, with founder Priscilla Sutton noting the awareness and positive conversation that paralympic athletes bring to the subject matter of prosthetic limbs.



This exhibition sought to use spare prosthetic limbs as the tool of creativity. However, as of late more and more artists see it as the product of creativity. 


John Powers


 John Powers, an artist trained in creating realistic bronze statues and abstract forms, had to face this life altering medical complication. In 2021, he sustained a traumatic and career-threatening injury that saw a power saw slice off a thumb and finger, and severely mangle two others. Powers has  said that art was the saving grace of his recovery, stating that “art has given me a way to look at this and take part in this.” Specifically, Powers sought to call on artists to create prosthetics which transcended function and provided avant garde and ornamental accessories for him to don at art openings. The first professional he called upon to create a prosthetic for him was Adam Poots, the founder of a tabletop board-game company. Poots’ design draws inspiration from a gauntlet prosthetic worn by a 16th century German Knight known as Götz of the Iron Hand. Powers has now launched a site, called Open Paw, which invites artists to submit designs. A future possibility is an exhibit of all submissions at Postmasters Gallery in New York. 





Sophie De Oliveira Barata 

 

Sophie de Oliveira Barata is a pioneer in the unique medium of artistic prosthetic creation. With a background in fine art and an early  job  creating prosthetics which allowed her to develop finely detailed model-making skills, she merged her multifaceted creativity and talent to found ‘The Alternative Limb Project’. This project explores the theme of body image, evolution, and modification using a combination of modern technology and traditional crafts. With her work aiming to promote a positive narrative around disability and to celebrate diversity, Barata makes about six limbs a year for a mostly private clientele. She works closely with her clients to ensure their personality is represented in their prosthetics, with no two works the same 




McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda 


Designers McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda launched Alleles Design Studio in 2013 after they noted the lack of design options for prosthetics. In the years since, they have been crafting stylish leg and arm covers that people can actually afford. The designer duo prioritise style and elegance in their designs, not creating for insurance companies or clinicians, but for those who need them. Their ambition was to create prosthetics that people want to don when hitting the town or hanging out with friends. 




This fairly new merge between functional prosthetic medicine and art is a medium to be celebrated. It is through these works that people who have suffered amputations or conditions that require prosthetics, are able to celebrate their individuality and differences in ways previously unavailable.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/01/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Sculpting Solutions: Art to Combat Disability
Amputation is not a failure of treatment but an effective management strategy for certain life threatening conditions. However, that does not make it any less devastating to those who receive it as a prognosis. We take a look into the ways that creative minds and artists have transformed medical and clinical objects into opportunities for design and beauty.


Spare Parts at The Rag Factory, 2012 


Spare Parts was an exhibition that brought together a diverse and multifaceted group of artists all using pre-loved prosthetics as their drawing board. The exhibition was synthesised by the culmination of prosthetics that were donated by amputees and clinics from all over the globe. Although not officially partnered with The Olympic Games, the exhibition ran at the same time as the Paralympics in London, with founder Priscilla Sutton noting the awareness and positive conversation that paralympic athletes bring to the subject matter of prosthetic limbs.



This exhibition sought to use spare prosthetic limbs as the tool of creativity. However, as of late more and more artists see it as the product of creativity. 


John Powers


 John Powers, an artist trained in creating realistic bronze statues and abstract forms, had to face this life altering medical complication. In 2021, he sustained a traumatic and career-threatening injury that saw a power saw slice off a thumb and finger, and severely mangle two others. Powers has  said that art was the saving grace of his recovery, stating that “art has given me a way to look at this and take part in this.” Specifically, Powers sought to call on artists to create prosthetics which transcended function and provided avant garde and ornamental accessories for him to don at art openings. The first professional he called upon to create a prosthetic for him was Adam Poots, the founder of a tabletop board-game company. Poots’ design draws inspiration from a gauntlet prosthetic worn by a 16th century German Knight known as Götz of the Iron Hand. Powers has now launched a site, called Open Paw, which invites artists to submit designs. A future possibility is an exhibit of all submissions at Postmasters Gallery in New York. 





Sophie De Oliveira Barata 

 

Sophie de Oliveira Barata is a pioneer in the unique medium of artistic prosthetic creation. With a background in fine art and an early  job  creating prosthetics which allowed her to develop finely detailed model-making skills, she merged her multifaceted creativity and talent to found ‘The Alternative Limb Project’. This project explores the theme of body image, evolution, and modification using a combination of modern technology and traditional crafts. With her work aiming to promote a positive narrative around disability and to celebrate diversity, Barata makes about six limbs a year for a mostly private clientele. She works closely with her clients to ensure their personality is represented in their prosthetics, with no two works the same 




McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda 


Designers McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda launched Alleles Design Studio in 2013 after they noted the lack of design options for prosthetics. In the years since, they have been crafting stylish leg and arm covers that people can actually afford. The designer duo prioritise style and elegance in their designs, not creating for insurance companies or clinicians, but for those who need them. Their ambition was to create prosthetics that people want to don when hitting the town or hanging out with friends. 




This fairly new merge between functional prosthetic medicine and art is a medium to be celebrated. It is through these works that people who have suffered amputations or conditions that require prosthetics, are able to celebrate their individuality and differences in ways previously unavailable.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/01/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Sculpting Solutions: Art to Combat Disability
Amputation is not a failure of treatment but an effective management strategy for certain life threatening conditions. However, that does not make it any less devastating to those who receive it as a prognosis. We take a look into the ways that creative minds and artists have transformed medical and clinical objects into opportunities for design and beauty.


Spare Parts at The Rag Factory, 2012 


Spare Parts was an exhibition that brought together a diverse and multifaceted group of artists all using pre-loved prosthetics as their drawing board. The exhibition was synthesised by the culmination of prosthetics that were donated by amputees and clinics from all over the globe. Although not officially partnered with The Olympic Games, the exhibition ran at the same time as the Paralympics in London, with founder Priscilla Sutton noting the awareness and positive conversation that paralympic athletes bring to the subject matter of prosthetic limbs.



This exhibition sought to use spare prosthetic limbs as the tool of creativity. However, as of late more and more artists see it as the product of creativity. 


John Powers


 John Powers, an artist trained in creating realistic bronze statues and abstract forms, had to face this life altering medical complication. In 2021, he sustained a traumatic and career-threatening injury that saw a power saw slice off a thumb and finger, and severely mangle two others. Powers has  said that art was the saving grace of his recovery, stating that “art has given me a way to look at this and take part in this.” Specifically, Powers sought to call on artists to create prosthetics which transcended function and provided avant garde and ornamental accessories for him to don at art openings. The first professional he called upon to create a prosthetic for him was Adam Poots, the founder of a tabletop board-game company. Poots’ design draws inspiration from a gauntlet prosthetic worn by a 16th century German Knight known as Götz of the Iron Hand. Powers has now launched a site, called Open Paw, which invites artists to submit designs. A future possibility is an exhibit of all submissions at Postmasters Gallery in New York. 





Sophie De Oliveira Barata 

 

Sophie de Oliveira Barata is a pioneer in the unique medium of artistic prosthetic creation. With a background in fine art and an early  job  creating prosthetics which allowed her to develop finely detailed model-making skills, she merged her multifaceted creativity and talent to found ‘The Alternative Limb Project’. This project explores the theme of body image, evolution, and modification using a combination of modern technology and traditional crafts. With her work aiming to promote a positive narrative around disability and to celebrate diversity, Barata makes about six limbs a year for a mostly private clientele. She works closely with her clients to ensure their personality is represented in their prosthetics, with no two works the same 




McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda 


Designers McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda launched Alleles Design Studio in 2013 after they noted the lack of design options for prosthetics. In the years since, they have been crafting stylish leg and arm covers that people can actually afford. The designer duo prioritise style and elegance in their designs, not creating for insurance companies or clinicians, but for those who need them. Their ambition was to create prosthetics that people want to don when hitting the town or hanging out with friends. 




This fairly new merge between functional prosthetic medicine and art is a medium to be celebrated. It is through these works that people who have suffered amputations or conditions that require prosthetics, are able to celebrate their individuality and differences in ways previously unavailable.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/01/2022
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
Sculpting Solutions: Art to Combat Disability
Amputation is not a failure of treatment but an effective management strategy for certain life threatening conditions. However, that does not make it any less devastating to those who receive it as a prognosis. We take a look into the ways that creative minds and artists have transformed medical and clinical objects into opportunities for design and beauty.


Spare Parts at The Rag Factory, 2012 


Spare Parts was an exhibition that brought together a diverse and multifaceted group of artists all using pre-loved prosthetics as their drawing board. The exhibition was synthesised by the culmination of prosthetics that were donated by amputees and clinics from all over the globe. Although not officially partnered with The Olympic Games, the exhibition ran at the same time as the Paralympics in London, with founder Priscilla Sutton noting the awareness and positive conversation that paralympic athletes bring to the subject matter of prosthetic limbs.



This exhibition sought to use spare prosthetic limbs as the tool of creativity. However, as of late more and more artists see it as the product of creativity. 


John Powers


 John Powers, an artist trained in creating realistic bronze statues and abstract forms, had to face this life altering medical complication. In 2021, he sustained a traumatic and career-threatening injury that saw a power saw slice off a thumb and finger, and severely mangle two others. Powers has  said that art was the saving grace of his recovery, stating that “art has given me a way to look at this and take part in this.” Specifically, Powers sought to call on artists to create prosthetics which transcended function and provided avant garde and ornamental accessories for him to don at art openings. The first professional he called upon to create a prosthetic for him was Adam Poots, the founder of a tabletop board-game company. Poots’ design draws inspiration from a gauntlet prosthetic worn by a 16th century German Knight known as Götz of the Iron Hand. Powers has now launched a site, called Open Paw, which invites artists to submit designs. A future possibility is an exhibit of all submissions at Postmasters Gallery in New York. 





Sophie De Oliveira Barata 

 

Sophie de Oliveira Barata is a pioneer in the unique medium of artistic prosthetic creation. With a background in fine art and an early  job  creating prosthetics which allowed her to develop finely detailed model-making skills, she merged her multifaceted creativity and talent to found ‘The Alternative Limb Project’. This project explores the theme of body image, evolution, and modification using a combination of modern technology and traditional crafts. With her work aiming to promote a positive narrative around disability and to celebrate diversity, Barata makes about six limbs a year for a mostly private clientele. She works closely with her clients to ensure their personality is represented in their prosthetics, with no two works the same 




McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda 


Designers McCauley Wanner and Ryan Palibroda launched Alleles Design Studio in 2013 after they noted the lack of design options for prosthetics. In the years since, they have been crafting stylish leg and arm covers that people can actually afford. The designer duo prioritise style and elegance in their designs, not creating for insurance companies or clinicians, but for those who need them. Their ambition was to create prosthetics that people want to don when hitting the town or hanging out with friends. 




This fairly new merge between functional prosthetic medicine and art is a medium to be celebrated. It is through these works that people who have suffered amputations or conditions that require prosthetics, are able to celebrate their individuality and differences in ways previously unavailable.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
Thanks For Reading
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.