15/09/2021
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
French Impressionists and Painted Prostitution
A look into the portrayal of prostitution within the widely celebrated art movement

In the nineteenth century, prostitution in Paris was widespread and exponential. Despite its undeniable existence and pervasive presence in Parisian culture, prostitution did not make for polite conversation. In the 1870s artists became particularly fascinated with the depiction of ladies of the night and their works were met with venomous criticism and surrounded by scandal.


Édouard Manet: Olympia (1863)

On two occasions, Manet painted works which depicted prostitutes and elicited great outrage and indignation when exhibited to the public. According to T.J. Clark, during this time the issue of prostitution was hiding underground, and Manet unburied it bringing it to the surface. Not only did Manet drudge up a topic considered taboo, but he also rejected the traditional trend for romanticising sex work. In Olympia the female figure's face is devoid of expression, perhaps even verging on boredom. By depicting the woman in the painting as disinterested, Manet challenges the romantic ideals of prostitution. He communicated the reality that women employed in sex work did not find the experiences romantic or enjoyable.

Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: The Medical Inspection (1894)

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec built his fame upon the foundation of his paintings depicting prostitutes. A frequent visitor of Moulin Rouge and other cabarets, Lautrec documented and captured these women in their reality rather than via the male gaze, opting for the rejection of objectification. The Medical Inspection depicts an experience of these women’s lives more intimate than their sexual encounters. It illustrates their compulsory gynaecological examination. Sexually transmitted diseases ran rife and rampant in this era due to the lack of contraception, protection, and education. Lautrec documents these events with neutrality, showing two women in the process of hiking up their dresses to reveal their genitalia to an invisible doctor. The blonde woman’s expression is possibly the most poignant element of this painting as one can clearly observe the look of resignation on her face. Despite being a paying client of this brothel, Lautrec’s own carnal pursuits are not present in the painting. Instead, it is a realistic depiction of the profession and there is no sentimentality or romanticism.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.


Edgar Degas: The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage (1874)

In nineteenth century Paris, women had two roles and two roles only. They were either housewives or courtesans. If a woman ventured outside the home for work, then the latter was suspected whether it was true or not. Thus, when Degas explored female professions outside the home such as ballerinas and milliners, the depictions were heavily imbued with suspicion that these women were in these employments to hide the true nature of their work: prostitution. In fact, Degas’s works did not stray from reality. Sex work was a part of a ballerina’s prerequisite. Behind the curtain of the glamorous opera houses, were rooms where powerful and wealthy men could conduct business and proposition young ballerinas. These relationships were unbalanced in their power as ballerinas entered the ballet usually as children from impoverished backgrounds and were subjected to the mercy of dominant and affluent men. Although Degas was grouped amongst the impressionists, he preferred to be called a realist. In truth, Degas’s works were peepholes to the sordid actuality of the French ballet.

Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
15/09/2021
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
French Impressionists and Painted Prostitution
A look into the portrayal of prostitution within the widely celebrated art movement

In the nineteenth century, prostitution in Paris was widespread and exponential. Despite its undeniable existence and pervasive presence in Parisian culture, prostitution did not make for polite conversation. In the 1870s artists became particularly fascinated with the depiction of ladies of the night and their works were met with venomous criticism and surrounded by scandal.


Édouard Manet: Olympia (1863)

On two occasions, Manet painted works which depicted prostitutes and elicited great outrage and indignation when exhibited to the public. According to T.J. Clark, during this time the issue of prostitution was hiding underground, and Manet unburied it bringing it to the surface. Not only did Manet drudge up a topic considered taboo, but he also rejected the traditional trend for romanticising sex work. In Olympia the female figure's face is devoid of expression, perhaps even verging on boredom. By depicting the woman in the painting as disinterested, Manet challenges the romantic ideals of prostitution. He communicated the reality that women employed in sex work did not find the experiences romantic or enjoyable.

Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: The Medical Inspection (1894)

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec built his fame upon the foundation of his paintings depicting prostitutes. A frequent visitor of Moulin Rouge and other cabarets, Lautrec documented and captured these women in their reality rather than via the male gaze, opting for the rejection of objectification. The Medical Inspection depicts an experience of these women’s lives more intimate than their sexual encounters. It illustrates their compulsory gynaecological examination. Sexually transmitted diseases ran rife and rampant in this era due to the lack of contraception, protection, and education. Lautrec documents these events with neutrality, showing two women in the process of hiking up their dresses to reveal their genitalia to an invisible doctor. The blonde woman’s expression is possibly the most poignant element of this painting as one can clearly observe the look of resignation on her face. Despite being a paying client of this brothel, Lautrec’s own carnal pursuits are not present in the painting. Instead, it is a realistic depiction of the profession and there is no sentimentality or romanticism.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.


Edgar Degas: The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage (1874)

In nineteenth century Paris, women had two roles and two roles only. They were either housewives or courtesans. If a woman ventured outside the home for work, then the latter was suspected whether it was true or not. Thus, when Degas explored female professions outside the home such as ballerinas and milliners, the depictions were heavily imbued with suspicion that these women were in these employments to hide the true nature of their work: prostitution. In fact, Degas’s works did not stray from reality. Sex work was a part of a ballerina’s prerequisite. Behind the curtain of the glamorous opera houses, were rooms where powerful and wealthy men could conduct business and proposition young ballerinas. These relationships were unbalanced in their power as ballerinas entered the ballet usually as children from impoverished backgrounds and were subjected to the mercy of dominant and affluent men. Although Degas was grouped amongst the impressionists, he preferred to be called a realist. In truth, Degas’s works were peepholes to the sordid actuality of the French ballet.

Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
15/09/2021
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
French Impressionists and Painted Prostitution
A look into the portrayal of prostitution within the widely celebrated art movement

In the nineteenth century, prostitution in Paris was widespread and exponential. Despite its undeniable existence and pervasive presence in Parisian culture, prostitution did not make for polite conversation. In the 1870s artists became particularly fascinated with the depiction of ladies of the night and their works were met with venomous criticism and surrounded by scandal.


Édouard Manet: Olympia (1863)

On two occasions, Manet painted works which depicted prostitutes and elicited great outrage and indignation when exhibited to the public. According to T.J. Clark, during this time the issue of prostitution was hiding underground, and Manet unburied it bringing it to the surface. Not only did Manet drudge up a topic considered taboo, but he also rejected the traditional trend for romanticising sex work. In Olympia the female figure's face is devoid of expression, perhaps even verging on boredom. By depicting the woman in the painting as disinterested, Manet challenges the romantic ideals of prostitution. He communicated the reality that women employed in sex work did not find the experiences romantic or enjoyable.

Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: The Medical Inspection (1894)

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec built his fame upon the foundation of his paintings depicting prostitutes. A frequent visitor of Moulin Rouge and other cabarets, Lautrec documented and captured these women in their reality rather than via the male gaze, opting for the rejection of objectification. The Medical Inspection depicts an experience of these women’s lives more intimate than their sexual encounters. It illustrates their compulsory gynaecological examination. Sexually transmitted diseases ran rife and rampant in this era due to the lack of contraception, protection, and education. Lautrec documents these events with neutrality, showing two women in the process of hiking up their dresses to reveal their genitalia to an invisible doctor. The blonde woman’s expression is possibly the most poignant element of this painting as one can clearly observe the look of resignation on her face. Despite being a paying client of this brothel, Lautrec’s own carnal pursuits are not present in the painting. Instead, it is a realistic depiction of the profession and there is no sentimentality or romanticism.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.


Edgar Degas: The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage (1874)

In nineteenth century Paris, women had two roles and two roles only. They were either housewives or courtesans. If a woman ventured outside the home for work, then the latter was suspected whether it was true or not. Thus, when Degas explored female professions outside the home such as ballerinas and milliners, the depictions were heavily imbued with suspicion that these women were in these employments to hide the true nature of their work: prostitution. In fact, Degas’s works did not stray from reality. Sex work was a part of a ballerina’s prerequisite. Behind the curtain of the glamorous opera houses, were rooms where powerful and wealthy men could conduct business and proposition young ballerinas. These relationships were unbalanced in their power as ballerinas entered the ballet usually as children from impoverished backgrounds and were subjected to the mercy of dominant and affluent men. Although Degas was grouped amongst the impressionists, he preferred to be called a realist. In truth, Degas’s works were peepholes to the sordid actuality of the French ballet.

Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
15/09/2021
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
French Impressionists and Painted Prostitution
A look into the portrayal of prostitution within the widely celebrated art movement

In the nineteenth century, prostitution in Paris was widespread and exponential. Despite its undeniable existence and pervasive presence in Parisian culture, prostitution did not make for polite conversation. In the 1870s artists became particularly fascinated with the depiction of ladies of the night and their works were met with venomous criticism and surrounded by scandal.


Édouard Manet: Olympia (1863)

On two occasions, Manet painted works which depicted prostitutes and elicited great outrage and indignation when exhibited to the public. According to T.J. Clark, during this time the issue of prostitution was hiding underground, and Manet unburied it bringing it to the surface. Not only did Manet drudge up a topic considered taboo, but he also rejected the traditional trend for romanticising sex work. In Olympia the female figure's face is devoid of expression, perhaps even verging on boredom. By depicting the woman in the painting as disinterested, Manet challenges the romantic ideals of prostitution. He communicated the reality that women employed in sex work did not find the experiences romantic or enjoyable.

Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: The Medical Inspection (1894)

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec built his fame upon the foundation of his paintings depicting prostitutes. A frequent visitor of Moulin Rouge and other cabarets, Lautrec documented and captured these women in their reality rather than via the male gaze, opting for the rejection of objectification. The Medical Inspection depicts an experience of these women’s lives more intimate than their sexual encounters. It illustrates their compulsory gynaecological examination. Sexually transmitted diseases ran rife and rampant in this era due to the lack of contraception, protection, and education. Lautrec documents these events with neutrality, showing two women in the process of hiking up their dresses to reveal their genitalia to an invisible doctor. The blonde woman’s expression is possibly the most poignant element of this painting as one can clearly observe the look of resignation on her face. Despite being a paying client of this brothel, Lautrec’s own carnal pursuits are not present in the painting. Instead, it is a realistic depiction of the profession and there is no sentimentality or romanticism.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.


Edgar Degas: The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage (1874)

In nineteenth century Paris, women had two roles and two roles only. They were either housewives or courtesans. If a woman ventured outside the home for work, then the latter was suspected whether it was true or not. Thus, when Degas explored female professions outside the home such as ballerinas and milliners, the depictions were heavily imbued with suspicion that these women were in these employments to hide the true nature of their work: prostitution. In fact, Degas’s works did not stray from reality. Sex work was a part of a ballerina’s prerequisite. Behind the curtain of the glamorous opera houses, were rooms where powerful and wealthy men could conduct business and proposition young ballerinas. These relationships were unbalanced in their power as ballerinas entered the ballet usually as children from impoverished backgrounds and were subjected to the mercy of dominant and affluent men. Although Degas was grouped amongst the impressionists, he preferred to be called a realist. In truth, Degas’s works were peepholes to the sordid actuality of the French ballet.

Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
15/09/2021
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
French Impressionists and Painted Prostitution
A look into the portrayal of prostitution within the widely celebrated art movement

In the nineteenth century, prostitution in Paris was widespread and exponential. Despite its undeniable existence and pervasive presence in Parisian culture, prostitution did not make for polite conversation. In the 1870s artists became particularly fascinated with the depiction of ladies of the night and their works were met with venomous criticism and surrounded by scandal.


Édouard Manet: Olympia (1863)

On two occasions, Manet painted works which depicted prostitutes and elicited great outrage and indignation when exhibited to the public. According to T.J. Clark, during this time the issue of prostitution was hiding underground, and Manet unburied it bringing it to the surface. Not only did Manet drudge up a topic considered taboo, but he also rejected the traditional trend for romanticising sex work. In Olympia the female figure's face is devoid of expression, perhaps even verging on boredom. By depicting the woman in the painting as disinterested, Manet challenges the romantic ideals of prostitution. He communicated the reality that women employed in sex work did not find the experiences romantic or enjoyable.

Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: The Medical Inspection (1894)

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec built his fame upon the foundation of his paintings depicting prostitutes. A frequent visitor of Moulin Rouge and other cabarets, Lautrec documented and captured these women in their reality rather than via the male gaze, opting for the rejection of objectification. The Medical Inspection depicts an experience of these women’s lives more intimate than their sexual encounters. It illustrates their compulsory gynaecological examination. Sexually transmitted diseases ran rife and rampant in this era due to the lack of contraception, protection, and education. Lautrec documents these events with neutrality, showing two women in the process of hiking up their dresses to reveal their genitalia to an invisible doctor. The blonde woman’s expression is possibly the most poignant element of this painting as one can clearly observe the look of resignation on her face. Despite being a paying client of this brothel, Lautrec’s own carnal pursuits are not present in the painting. Instead, it is a realistic depiction of the profession and there is no sentimentality or romanticism.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.


Edgar Degas: The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage (1874)

In nineteenth century Paris, women had two roles and two roles only. They were either housewives or courtesans. If a woman ventured outside the home for work, then the latter was suspected whether it was true or not. Thus, when Degas explored female professions outside the home such as ballerinas and milliners, the depictions were heavily imbued with suspicion that these women were in these employments to hide the true nature of their work: prostitution. In fact, Degas’s works did not stray from reality. Sex work was a part of a ballerina’s prerequisite. Behind the curtain of the glamorous opera houses, were rooms where powerful and wealthy men could conduct business and proposition young ballerinas. These relationships were unbalanced in their power as ballerinas entered the ballet usually as children from impoverished backgrounds and were subjected to the mercy of dominant and affluent men. Although Degas was grouped amongst the impressionists, he preferred to be called a realist. In truth, Degas’s works were peepholes to the sordid actuality of the French ballet.

Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
15/09/2021
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
French Impressionists and Painted Prostitution

In the nineteenth century, prostitution in Paris was widespread and exponential. Despite its undeniable existence and pervasive presence in Parisian culture, prostitution did not make for polite conversation. In the 1870s artists became particularly fascinated with the depiction of ladies of the night and their works were met with venomous criticism and surrounded by scandal.


Édouard Manet: Olympia (1863)

On two occasions, Manet painted works which depicted prostitutes and elicited great outrage and indignation when exhibited to the public. According to T.J. Clark, during this time the issue of prostitution was hiding underground, and Manet unburied it bringing it to the surface. Not only did Manet drudge up a topic considered taboo, but he also rejected the traditional trend for romanticising sex work. In Olympia the female figure's face is devoid of expression, perhaps even verging on boredom. By depicting the woman in the painting as disinterested, Manet challenges the romantic ideals of prostitution. He communicated the reality that women employed in sex work did not find the experiences romantic or enjoyable.

Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: The Medical Inspection (1894)

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec built his fame upon the foundation of his paintings depicting prostitutes. A frequent visitor of Moulin Rouge and other cabarets, Lautrec documented and captured these women in their reality rather than via the male gaze, opting for the rejection of objectification. The Medical Inspection depicts an experience of these women’s lives more intimate than their sexual encounters. It illustrates their compulsory gynaecological examination. Sexually transmitted diseases ran rife and rampant in this era due to the lack of contraception, protection, and education. Lautrec documents these events with neutrality, showing two women in the process of hiking up their dresses to reveal their genitalia to an invisible doctor. The blonde woman’s expression is possibly the most poignant element of this painting as one can clearly observe the look of resignation on her face. Despite being a paying client of this brothel, Lautrec’s own carnal pursuits are not present in the painting. Instead, it is a realistic depiction of the profession and there is no sentimentality or romanticism.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.


Edgar Degas: The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage (1874)

In nineteenth century Paris, women had two roles and two roles only. They were either housewives or courtesans. If a woman ventured outside the home for work, then the latter was suspected whether it was true or not. Thus, when Degas explored female professions outside the home such as ballerinas and milliners, the depictions were heavily imbued with suspicion that these women were in these employments to hide the true nature of their work: prostitution. In fact, Degas’s works did not stray from reality. Sex work was a part of a ballerina’s prerequisite. Behind the curtain of the glamorous opera houses, were rooms where powerful and wealthy men could conduct business and proposition young ballerinas. These relationships were unbalanced in their power as ballerinas entered the ballet usually as children from impoverished backgrounds and were subjected to the mercy of dominant and affluent men. Although Degas was grouped amongst the impressionists, he preferred to be called a realist. In truth, Degas’s works were peepholes to the sordid actuality of the French ballet.

Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
15/09/2021
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
French Impressionists and Painted Prostitution
A look into the portrayal of prostitution within the widely celebrated art movement

In the nineteenth century, prostitution in Paris was widespread and exponential. Despite its undeniable existence and pervasive presence in Parisian culture, prostitution did not make for polite conversation. In the 1870s artists became particularly fascinated with the depiction of ladies of the night and their works were met with venomous criticism and surrounded by scandal.


Édouard Manet: Olympia (1863)

On two occasions, Manet painted works which depicted prostitutes and elicited great outrage and indignation when exhibited to the public. According to T.J. Clark, during this time the issue of prostitution was hiding underground, and Manet unburied it bringing it to the surface. Not only did Manet drudge up a topic considered taboo, but he also rejected the traditional trend for romanticising sex work. In Olympia the female figure's face is devoid of expression, perhaps even verging on boredom. By depicting the woman in the painting as disinterested, Manet challenges the romantic ideals of prostitution. He communicated the reality that women employed in sex work did not find the experiences romantic or enjoyable.

Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: The Medical Inspection (1894)

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec built his fame upon the foundation of his paintings depicting prostitutes. A frequent visitor of Moulin Rouge and other cabarets, Lautrec documented and captured these women in their reality rather than via the male gaze, opting for the rejection of objectification. The Medical Inspection depicts an experience of these women’s lives more intimate than their sexual encounters. It illustrates their compulsory gynaecological examination. Sexually transmitted diseases ran rife and rampant in this era due to the lack of contraception, protection, and education. Lautrec documents these events with neutrality, showing two women in the process of hiking up their dresses to reveal their genitalia to an invisible doctor. The blonde woman’s expression is possibly the most poignant element of this painting as one can clearly observe the look of resignation on her face. Despite being a paying client of this brothel, Lautrec’s own carnal pursuits are not present in the painting. Instead, it is a realistic depiction of the profession and there is no sentimentality or romanticism.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.


Edgar Degas: The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage (1874)

In nineteenth century Paris, women had two roles and two roles only. They were either housewives or courtesans. If a woman ventured outside the home for work, then the latter was suspected whether it was true or not. Thus, when Degas explored female professions outside the home such as ballerinas and milliners, the depictions were heavily imbued with suspicion that these women were in these employments to hide the true nature of their work: prostitution. In fact, Degas’s works did not stray from reality. Sex work was a part of a ballerina’s prerequisite. Behind the curtain of the glamorous opera houses, were rooms where powerful and wealthy men could conduct business and proposition young ballerinas. These relationships were unbalanced in their power as ballerinas entered the ballet usually as children from impoverished backgrounds and were subjected to the mercy of dominant and affluent men. Although Degas was grouped amongst the impressionists, he preferred to be called a realist. In truth, Degas’s works were peepholes to the sordid actuality of the French ballet.

Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
15/09/2021
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
French Impressionists and Painted Prostitution
A look into the portrayal of prostitution within the widely celebrated art movement

In the nineteenth century, prostitution in Paris was widespread and exponential. Despite its undeniable existence and pervasive presence in Parisian culture, prostitution did not make for polite conversation. In the 1870s artists became particularly fascinated with the depiction of ladies of the night and their works were met with venomous criticism and surrounded by scandal.


Édouard Manet: Olympia (1863)

On two occasions, Manet painted works which depicted prostitutes and elicited great outrage and indignation when exhibited to the public. According to T.J. Clark, during this time the issue of prostitution was hiding underground, and Manet unburied it bringing it to the surface. Not only did Manet drudge up a topic considered taboo, but he also rejected the traditional trend for romanticising sex work. In Olympia the female figure's face is devoid of expression, perhaps even verging on boredom. By depicting the woman in the painting as disinterested, Manet challenges the romantic ideals of prostitution. He communicated the reality that women employed in sex work did not find the experiences romantic or enjoyable.

Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: The Medical Inspection (1894)

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec built his fame upon the foundation of his paintings depicting prostitutes. A frequent visitor of Moulin Rouge and other cabarets, Lautrec documented and captured these women in their reality rather than via the male gaze, opting for the rejection of objectification. The Medical Inspection depicts an experience of these women’s lives more intimate than their sexual encounters. It illustrates their compulsory gynaecological examination. Sexually transmitted diseases ran rife and rampant in this era due to the lack of contraception, protection, and education. Lautrec documents these events with neutrality, showing two women in the process of hiking up their dresses to reveal their genitalia to an invisible doctor. The blonde woman’s expression is possibly the most poignant element of this painting as one can clearly observe the look of resignation on her face. Despite being a paying client of this brothel, Lautrec’s own carnal pursuits are not present in the painting. Instead, it is a realistic depiction of the profession and there is no sentimentality or romanticism.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.


Edgar Degas: The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage (1874)

In nineteenth century Paris, women had two roles and two roles only. They were either housewives or courtesans. If a woman ventured outside the home for work, then the latter was suspected whether it was true or not. Thus, when Degas explored female professions outside the home such as ballerinas and milliners, the depictions were heavily imbued with suspicion that these women were in these employments to hide the true nature of their work: prostitution. In fact, Degas’s works did not stray from reality. Sex work was a part of a ballerina’s prerequisite. Behind the curtain of the glamorous opera houses, were rooms where powerful and wealthy men could conduct business and proposition young ballerinas. These relationships were unbalanced in their power as ballerinas entered the ballet usually as children from impoverished backgrounds and were subjected to the mercy of dominant and affluent men. Although Degas was grouped amongst the impressionists, he preferred to be called a realist. In truth, Degas’s works were peepholes to the sordid actuality of the French ballet.

Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
15/09/2021
Discussions
Sioned Bryant
French Impressionists and Painted Prostitution
A look into the portrayal of prostitution within the widely celebrated art movement

In the nineteenth century, prostitution in Paris was widespread and exponential. Despite its undeniable existence and pervasive presence in Parisian culture, prostitution did not make for polite conversation. In the 1870s artists became particularly fascinated with the depiction of ladies of the night and their works were met with venomous criticism and surrounded by scandal.


Édouard Manet: Olympia (1863)

On two occasions, Manet painted works which depicted prostitutes and elicited great outrage and indignation when exhibited to the public. According to T.J. Clark, during this time the issue of prostitution was hiding underground, and Manet unburied it bringing it to the surface. Not only did Manet drudge up a topic considered taboo, but he also rejected the traditional trend for romanticising sex work. In Olympia the female figure's face is devoid of expression, perhaps even verging on boredom. By depicting the woman in the painting as disinterested, Manet challenges the romantic ideals of prostitution. He communicated the reality that women employed in sex work did not find the experiences romantic or enjoyable.

Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: The Medical Inspection (1894)

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec built his fame upon the foundation of his paintings depicting prostitutes. A frequent visitor of Moulin Rouge and other cabarets, Lautrec documented and captured these women in their reality rather than via the male gaze, opting for the rejection of objectification. The Medical Inspection depicts an experience of these women’s lives more intimate than their sexual encounters. It illustrates their compulsory gynaecological examination. Sexually transmitted diseases ran rife and rampant in this era due to the lack of contraception, protection, and education. Lautrec documents these events with neutrality, showing two women in the process of hiking up their dresses to reveal their genitalia to an invisible doctor. The blonde woman’s expression is possibly the most poignant element of this painting as one can clearly observe the look of resignation on her face. Despite being a paying client of this brothel, Lautrec’s own carnal pursuits are not present in the painting. Instead, it is a realistic depiction of the profession and there is no sentimentality or romanticism.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.


Edgar Degas: The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage (1874)

In nineteenth century Paris, women had two roles and two roles only. They were either housewives or courtesans. If a woman ventured outside the home for work, then the latter was suspected whether it was true or not. Thus, when Degas explored female professions outside the home such as ballerinas and milliners, the depictions were heavily imbued with suspicion that these women were in these employments to hide the true nature of their work: prostitution. In fact, Degas’s works did not stray from reality. Sex work was a part of a ballerina’s prerequisite. Behind the curtain of the glamorous opera houses, were rooms where powerful and wealthy men could conduct business and proposition young ballerinas. These relationships were unbalanced in their power as ballerinas entered the ballet usually as children from impoverished backgrounds and were subjected to the mercy of dominant and affluent men. Although Degas was grouped amongst the impressionists, he preferred to be called a realist. In truth, Degas’s works were peepholes to the sordid actuality of the French ballet.

Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.


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15/09/2021
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Sioned Bryant
French Impressionists and Painted Prostitution
A look into the portrayal of prostitution within the widely celebrated art movement

In the nineteenth century, prostitution in Paris was widespread and exponential. Despite its undeniable existence and pervasive presence in Parisian culture, prostitution did not make for polite conversation. In the 1870s artists became particularly fascinated with the depiction of ladies of the night and their works were met with venomous criticism and surrounded by scandal.


Édouard Manet: Olympia (1863)

On two occasions, Manet painted works which depicted prostitutes and elicited great outrage and indignation when exhibited to the public. According to T.J. Clark, during this time the issue of prostitution was hiding underground, and Manet unburied it bringing it to the surface. Not only did Manet drudge up a topic considered taboo, but he also rejected the traditional trend for romanticising sex work. In Olympia the female figure's face is devoid of expression, perhaps even verging on boredom. By depicting the woman in the painting as disinterested, Manet challenges the romantic ideals of prostitution. He communicated the reality that women employed in sex work did not find the experiences romantic or enjoyable.

Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas.


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: The Medical Inspection (1894)

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec built his fame upon the foundation of his paintings depicting prostitutes. A frequent visitor of Moulin Rouge and other cabarets, Lautrec documented and captured these women in their reality rather than via the male gaze, opting for the rejection of objectification. The Medical Inspection depicts an experience of these women’s lives more intimate than their sexual encounters. It illustrates their compulsory gynaecological examination. Sexually transmitted diseases ran rife and rampant in this era due to the lack of contraception, protection, and education. Lautrec documents these events with neutrality, showing two women in the process of hiking up their dresses to reveal their genitalia to an invisible doctor. The blonde woman’s expression is possibly the most poignant element of this painting as one can clearly observe the look of resignation on her face. Despite being a paying client of this brothel, Lautrec’s own carnal pursuits are not present in the painting. Instead, it is a realistic depiction of the profession and there is no sentimentality or romanticism.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Medical Inspection, 1894. Oil on cardboard.


Edgar Degas: The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage (1874)

In nineteenth century Paris, women had two roles and two roles only. They were either housewives or courtesans. If a woman ventured outside the home for work, then the latter was suspected whether it was true or not. Thus, when Degas explored female professions outside the home such as ballerinas and milliners, the depictions were heavily imbued with suspicion that these women were in these employments to hide the true nature of their work: prostitution. In fact, Degas’s works did not stray from reality. Sex work was a part of a ballerina’s prerequisite. Behind the curtain of the glamorous opera houses, were rooms where powerful and wealthy men could conduct business and proposition young ballerinas. These relationships were unbalanced in their power as ballerinas entered the ballet usually as children from impoverished backgrounds and were subjected to the mercy of dominant and affluent men. Although Degas was grouped amongst the impressionists, he preferred to be called a realist. In truth, Degas’s works were peepholes to the sordid actuality of the French ballet.

Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874. Oil colors freely mixed with turpentine, with traces of watercolor and pastel over pen-and-ink drawing on cream-colored wove paper, laid down on bristol board and mounted on canvas.


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