09/09/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this September
Presenting the best art on display in the capital this month
Scattered Nimbus, Josh Raz, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie at Ronchini Gallery

London-based fine artist Josh Raz’s first solo exhibition at Ronchini Gallery reimagine the way that artists conceptualise landscapes. Here, the human figures in the landscape are more than just decoration; they are the essential focal point through which the scenery is viewed, “consider[ing] how a landscape may be internalised and changed through the experiences of different individuals within the same collective narrative”. Rather than accurately showing the landscape as it physically appears, Raz instead painted surroundings as they are seen by the figures observing them, frequently depicting the same view from various perspectives. Through these various interpersonal visions of the world, Raz also encourages viewers to consider the temporal context of the land, and the generations of people it has been home to. This explicitly ephemeral view of landscapes characterises the work throughout Trails Through a Reverie, and represents a unique new approach to the art form

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie is showing at Ronchini Gallery until 6th October

Witching Hour, Cristian Avram, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Cristian Avram: Lapse at Workplace

Serving as something of a counterpoint to Josh Raz’s exhibition, Workplace Gallery’s Lapse takes a different approach to landscapes. The last UK solo show of Romanian artist Cristian Avram, Lapse depicts domestic interiors stripped of human presence, implied only by the objects and shadows they have left behind. Avram creates these stripped-down interiors by taking photos of his daily life and removing everything he considers a superfluous detail. People serve not as the focal point of Avram’s paintings, but as the implied non-presence that could interrupt the tranquillity of the scene at any point, subverting the supposed hierarchy between figure, place and object. Similarly, the objects within Avram’s compositions reflect the history of his home country, with products of the developing capitalist society existing alongside indicators of the nation’s Soviet past; where Raz’s landscapes embrace their inherent ephemerality, Avram’s paintings depict “timeless images that capture glimpses of ordinary human activity against the vastness of the world and its history”.

Cristian Avram: Lapse is showing at Workplace Gallery until 8th October

The Twain Shall Meet, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, 2015 (Acrylic and xerox transfers on paper)

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro

Coinciding with the publication of her major new book The Story of Art Without Men on 8th September, Katy Hessel has curated the exhibition The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro. While the book explores women artists across the last 500 years of art history, the exhibition at Victoria Miro is based on its final chapter of the same name, bringing together a selection of women artists who have defined the contemporary art movement over the past two decades. Across the various works on display, Hessel’s exhibition covers figuration, abstraction, sculpture and installation, all by women artists who focus on tackling the inequalities of the art world, from reimagining concepts of utopia and dystopia to rewriting and decolonising art history. Featuring work by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, María Berrío, Somaya Critchlow, Tracey Emin, Jadé Fadojutimi, Chantal Joffe, Julie Mehretu, Zanele Muholi, Wangechi Mutu, Celia Paul, Deborah Roberts, Khadija Saye, Sarah Sze and Flora Yukhnovich, The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written presents a direct challenge to the perceived artistic ‘canon’ of the twenty-first century.

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written is showing at Victoria Miro from 8th September until 1st October

The Gulf Stream, Winslow Homer, 1899

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature at The National Gallery

Opening on 10th September, The National Gallery presents the first ever UK exhibition of American realist painter Winslow Homer (1836-1920). Homer’s career in the final decades of the nineteenth century confronted some of the major social issues facing the United States at the time, with the artist living through the American Civil War, abolition of slavery and conflict with Spain, the last of the European colonial powers in the Americas. The issues he addressed - race, conflict, and the relationship between humans and the natural world - are still relevant to modern viewers, and Homer’s focus on the lives of Americans, particularly previously-enslaved African Americans, make for important historical viewing. Winslow Homer’s interest in depicting conflict remained a constant throughout his career even as he travelled outside the United States, painting scenes of resistance in the English town of Cullercoats on the North-East coast, and against the lush backdrop of Caribbean vegetation. The exhibition itself is part of a series by The National Gallery introducing major American artists to UK audiences, and is organised in conjunction with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature is showing at The National Gallery from 10th September until 8th January 2023

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
09/09/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this September
Presenting the best art on display in the capital this month
Scattered Nimbus, Josh Raz, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie at Ronchini Gallery

London-based fine artist Josh Raz’s first solo exhibition at Ronchini Gallery reimagine the way that artists conceptualise landscapes. Here, the human figures in the landscape are more than just decoration; they are the essential focal point through which the scenery is viewed, “consider[ing] how a landscape may be internalised and changed through the experiences of different individuals within the same collective narrative”. Rather than accurately showing the landscape as it physically appears, Raz instead painted surroundings as they are seen by the figures observing them, frequently depicting the same view from various perspectives. Through these various interpersonal visions of the world, Raz also encourages viewers to consider the temporal context of the land, and the generations of people it has been home to. This explicitly ephemeral view of landscapes characterises the work throughout Trails Through a Reverie, and represents a unique new approach to the art form

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie is showing at Ronchini Gallery until 6th October

Witching Hour, Cristian Avram, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Cristian Avram: Lapse at Workplace

Serving as something of a counterpoint to Josh Raz’s exhibition, Workplace Gallery’s Lapse takes a different approach to landscapes. The last UK solo show of Romanian artist Cristian Avram, Lapse depicts domestic interiors stripped of human presence, implied only by the objects and shadows they have left behind. Avram creates these stripped-down interiors by taking photos of his daily life and removing everything he considers a superfluous detail. People serve not as the focal point of Avram’s paintings, but as the implied non-presence that could interrupt the tranquillity of the scene at any point, subverting the supposed hierarchy between figure, place and object. Similarly, the objects within Avram’s compositions reflect the history of his home country, with products of the developing capitalist society existing alongside indicators of the nation’s Soviet past; where Raz’s landscapes embrace their inherent ephemerality, Avram’s paintings depict “timeless images that capture glimpses of ordinary human activity against the vastness of the world and its history”.

Cristian Avram: Lapse is showing at Workplace Gallery until 8th October

The Twain Shall Meet, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, 2015 (Acrylic and xerox transfers on paper)

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro

Coinciding with the publication of her major new book The Story of Art Without Men on 8th September, Katy Hessel has curated the exhibition The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro. While the book explores women artists across the last 500 years of art history, the exhibition at Victoria Miro is based on its final chapter of the same name, bringing together a selection of women artists who have defined the contemporary art movement over the past two decades. Across the various works on display, Hessel’s exhibition covers figuration, abstraction, sculpture and installation, all by women artists who focus on tackling the inequalities of the art world, from reimagining concepts of utopia and dystopia to rewriting and decolonising art history. Featuring work by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, María Berrío, Somaya Critchlow, Tracey Emin, Jadé Fadojutimi, Chantal Joffe, Julie Mehretu, Zanele Muholi, Wangechi Mutu, Celia Paul, Deborah Roberts, Khadija Saye, Sarah Sze and Flora Yukhnovich, The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written presents a direct challenge to the perceived artistic ‘canon’ of the twenty-first century.

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written is showing at Victoria Miro from 8th September until 1st October

The Gulf Stream, Winslow Homer, 1899

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature at The National Gallery

Opening on 10th September, The National Gallery presents the first ever UK exhibition of American realist painter Winslow Homer (1836-1920). Homer’s career in the final decades of the nineteenth century confronted some of the major social issues facing the United States at the time, with the artist living through the American Civil War, abolition of slavery and conflict with Spain, the last of the European colonial powers in the Americas. The issues he addressed - race, conflict, and the relationship between humans and the natural world - are still relevant to modern viewers, and Homer’s focus on the lives of Americans, particularly previously-enslaved African Americans, make for important historical viewing. Winslow Homer’s interest in depicting conflict remained a constant throughout his career even as he travelled outside the United States, painting scenes of resistance in the English town of Cullercoats on the North-East coast, and against the lush backdrop of Caribbean vegetation. The exhibition itself is part of a series by The National Gallery introducing major American artists to UK audiences, and is organised in conjunction with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature is showing at The National Gallery from 10th September until 8th January 2023

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
09/09/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this September
Presenting the best art on display in the capital this month
Scattered Nimbus, Josh Raz, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie at Ronchini Gallery

London-based fine artist Josh Raz’s first solo exhibition at Ronchini Gallery reimagine the way that artists conceptualise landscapes. Here, the human figures in the landscape are more than just decoration; they are the essential focal point through which the scenery is viewed, “consider[ing] how a landscape may be internalised and changed through the experiences of different individuals within the same collective narrative”. Rather than accurately showing the landscape as it physically appears, Raz instead painted surroundings as they are seen by the figures observing them, frequently depicting the same view from various perspectives. Through these various interpersonal visions of the world, Raz also encourages viewers to consider the temporal context of the land, and the generations of people it has been home to. This explicitly ephemeral view of landscapes characterises the work throughout Trails Through a Reverie, and represents a unique new approach to the art form

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie is showing at Ronchini Gallery until 6th October

Witching Hour, Cristian Avram, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Cristian Avram: Lapse at Workplace

Serving as something of a counterpoint to Josh Raz’s exhibition, Workplace Gallery’s Lapse takes a different approach to landscapes. The last UK solo show of Romanian artist Cristian Avram, Lapse depicts domestic interiors stripped of human presence, implied only by the objects and shadows they have left behind. Avram creates these stripped-down interiors by taking photos of his daily life and removing everything he considers a superfluous detail. People serve not as the focal point of Avram’s paintings, but as the implied non-presence that could interrupt the tranquillity of the scene at any point, subverting the supposed hierarchy between figure, place and object. Similarly, the objects within Avram’s compositions reflect the history of his home country, with products of the developing capitalist society existing alongside indicators of the nation’s Soviet past; where Raz’s landscapes embrace their inherent ephemerality, Avram’s paintings depict “timeless images that capture glimpses of ordinary human activity against the vastness of the world and its history”.

Cristian Avram: Lapse is showing at Workplace Gallery until 8th October

The Twain Shall Meet, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, 2015 (Acrylic and xerox transfers on paper)

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro

Coinciding with the publication of her major new book The Story of Art Without Men on 8th September, Katy Hessel has curated the exhibition The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro. While the book explores women artists across the last 500 years of art history, the exhibition at Victoria Miro is based on its final chapter of the same name, bringing together a selection of women artists who have defined the contemporary art movement over the past two decades. Across the various works on display, Hessel’s exhibition covers figuration, abstraction, sculpture and installation, all by women artists who focus on tackling the inequalities of the art world, from reimagining concepts of utopia and dystopia to rewriting and decolonising art history. Featuring work by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, María Berrío, Somaya Critchlow, Tracey Emin, Jadé Fadojutimi, Chantal Joffe, Julie Mehretu, Zanele Muholi, Wangechi Mutu, Celia Paul, Deborah Roberts, Khadija Saye, Sarah Sze and Flora Yukhnovich, The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written presents a direct challenge to the perceived artistic ‘canon’ of the twenty-first century.

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written is showing at Victoria Miro from 8th September until 1st October

The Gulf Stream, Winslow Homer, 1899

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature at The National Gallery

Opening on 10th September, The National Gallery presents the first ever UK exhibition of American realist painter Winslow Homer (1836-1920). Homer’s career in the final decades of the nineteenth century confronted some of the major social issues facing the United States at the time, with the artist living through the American Civil War, abolition of slavery and conflict with Spain, the last of the European colonial powers in the Americas. The issues he addressed - race, conflict, and the relationship between humans and the natural world - are still relevant to modern viewers, and Homer’s focus on the lives of Americans, particularly previously-enslaved African Americans, make for important historical viewing. Winslow Homer’s interest in depicting conflict remained a constant throughout his career even as he travelled outside the United States, painting scenes of resistance in the English town of Cullercoats on the North-East coast, and against the lush backdrop of Caribbean vegetation. The exhibition itself is part of a series by The National Gallery introducing major American artists to UK audiences, and is organised in conjunction with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature is showing at The National Gallery from 10th September until 8th January 2023

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
09/09/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this September
Presenting the best art on display in the capital this month
Scattered Nimbus, Josh Raz, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie at Ronchini Gallery

London-based fine artist Josh Raz’s first solo exhibition at Ronchini Gallery reimagine the way that artists conceptualise landscapes. Here, the human figures in the landscape are more than just decoration; they are the essential focal point through which the scenery is viewed, “consider[ing] how a landscape may be internalised and changed through the experiences of different individuals within the same collective narrative”. Rather than accurately showing the landscape as it physically appears, Raz instead painted surroundings as they are seen by the figures observing them, frequently depicting the same view from various perspectives. Through these various interpersonal visions of the world, Raz also encourages viewers to consider the temporal context of the land, and the generations of people it has been home to. This explicitly ephemeral view of landscapes characterises the work throughout Trails Through a Reverie, and represents a unique new approach to the art form

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie is showing at Ronchini Gallery until 6th October

Witching Hour, Cristian Avram, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Cristian Avram: Lapse at Workplace

Serving as something of a counterpoint to Josh Raz’s exhibition, Workplace Gallery’s Lapse takes a different approach to landscapes. The last UK solo show of Romanian artist Cristian Avram, Lapse depicts domestic interiors stripped of human presence, implied only by the objects and shadows they have left behind. Avram creates these stripped-down interiors by taking photos of his daily life and removing everything he considers a superfluous detail. People serve not as the focal point of Avram’s paintings, but as the implied non-presence that could interrupt the tranquillity of the scene at any point, subverting the supposed hierarchy between figure, place and object. Similarly, the objects within Avram’s compositions reflect the history of his home country, with products of the developing capitalist society existing alongside indicators of the nation’s Soviet past; where Raz’s landscapes embrace their inherent ephemerality, Avram’s paintings depict “timeless images that capture glimpses of ordinary human activity against the vastness of the world and its history”.

Cristian Avram: Lapse is showing at Workplace Gallery until 8th October

The Twain Shall Meet, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, 2015 (Acrylic and xerox transfers on paper)

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro

Coinciding with the publication of her major new book The Story of Art Without Men on 8th September, Katy Hessel has curated the exhibition The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro. While the book explores women artists across the last 500 years of art history, the exhibition at Victoria Miro is based on its final chapter of the same name, bringing together a selection of women artists who have defined the contemporary art movement over the past two decades. Across the various works on display, Hessel’s exhibition covers figuration, abstraction, sculpture and installation, all by women artists who focus on tackling the inequalities of the art world, from reimagining concepts of utopia and dystopia to rewriting and decolonising art history. Featuring work by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, María Berrío, Somaya Critchlow, Tracey Emin, Jadé Fadojutimi, Chantal Joffe, Julie Mehretu, Zanele Muholi, Wangechi Mutu, Celia Paul, Deborah Roberts, Khadija Saye, Sarah Sze and Flora Yukhnovich, The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written presents a direct challenge to the perceived artistic ‘canon’ of the twenty-first century.

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written is showing at Victoria Miro from 8th September until 1st October

The Gulf Stream, Winslow Homer, 1899

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature at The National Gallery

Opening on 10th September, The National Gallery presents the first ever UK exhibition of American realist painter Winslow Homer (1836-1920). Homer’s career in the final decades of the nineteenth century confronted some of the major social issues facing the United States at the time, with the artist living through the American Civil War, abolition of slavery and conflict with Spain, the last of the European colonial powers in the Americas. The issues he addressed - race, conflict, and the relationship between humans and the natural world - are still relevant to modern viewers, and Homer’s focus on the lives of Americans, particularly previously-enslaved African Americans, make for important historical viewing. Winslow Homer’s interest in depicting conflict remained a constant throughout his career even as he travelled outside the United States, painting scenes of resistance in the English town of Cullercoats on the North-East coast, and against the lush backdrop of Caribbean vegetation. The exhibition itself is part of a series by The National Gallery introducing major American artists to UK audiences, and is organised in conjunction with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature is showing at The National Gallery from 10th September until 8th January 2023

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
09/09/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this September
Presenting the best art on display in the capital this month
Scattered Nimbus, Josh Raz, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie at Ronchini Gallery

London-based fine artist Josh Raz’s first solo exhibition at Ronchini Gallery reimagine the way that artists conceptualise landscapes. Here, the human figures in the landscape are more than just decoration; they are the essential focal point through which the scenery is viewed, “consider[ing] how a landscape may be internalised and changed through the experiences of different individuals within the same collective narrative”. Rather than accurately showing the landscape as it physically appears, Raz instead painted surroundings as they are seen by the figures observing them, frequently depicting the same view from various perspectives. Through these various interpersonal visions of the world, Raz also encourages viewers to consider the temporal context of the land, and the generations of people it has been home to. This explicitly ephemeral view of landscapes characterises the work throughout Trails Through a Reverie, and represents a unique new approach to the art form

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie is showing at Ronchini Gallery until 6th October

Witching Hour, Cristian Avram, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Cristian Avram: Lapse at Workplace

Serving as something of a counterpoint to Josh Raz’s exhibition, Workplace Gallery’s Lapse takes a different approach to landscapes. The last UK solo show of Romanian artist Cristian Avram, Lapse depicts domestic interiors stripped of human presence, implied only by the objects and shadows they have left behind. Avram creates these stripped-down interiors by taking photos of his daily life and removing everything he considers a superfluous detail. People serve not as the focal point of Avram’s paintings, but as the implied non-presence that could interrupt the tranquillity of the scene at any point, subverting the supposed hierarchy between figure, place and object. Similarly, the objects within Avram’s compositions reflect the history of his home country, with products of the developing capitalist society existing alongside indicators of the nation’s Soviet past; where Raz’s landscapes embrace their inherent ephemerality, Avram’s paintings depict “timeless images that capture glimpses of ordinary human activity against the vastness of the world and its history”.

Cristian Avram: Lapse is showing at Workplace Gallery until 8th October

The Twain Shall Meet, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, 2015 (Acrylic and xerox transfers on paper)

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro

Coinciding with the publication of her major new book The Story of Art Without Men on 8th September, Katy Hessel has curated the exhibition The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro. While the book explores women artists across the last 500 years of art history, the exhibition at Victoria Miro is based on its final chapter of the same name, bringing together a selection of women artists who have defined the contemporary art movement over the past two decades. Across the various works on display, Hessel’s exhibition covers figuration, abstraction, sculpture and installation, all by women artists who focus on tackling the inequalities of the art world, from reimagining concepts of utopia and dystopia to rewriting and decolonising art history. Featuring work by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, María Berrío, Somaya Critchlow, Tracey Emin, Jadé Fadojutimi, Chantal Joffe, Julie Mehretu, Zanele Muholi, Wangechi Mutu, Celia Paul, Deborah Roberts, Khadija Saye, Sarah Sze and Flora Yukhnovich, The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written presents a direct challenge to the perceived artistic ‘canon’ of the twenty-first century.

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written is showing at Victoria Miro from 8th September until 1st October

The Gulf Stream, Winslow Homer, 1899

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature at The National Gallery

Opening on 10th September, The National Gallery presents the first ever UK exhibition of American realist painter Winslow Homer (1836-1920). Homer’s career in the final decades of the nineteenth century confronted some of the major social issues facing the United States at the time, with the artist living through the American Civil War, abolition of slavery and conflict with Spain, the last of the European colonial powers in the Americas. The issues he addressed - race, conflict, and the relationship between humans and the natural world - are still relevant to modern viewers, and Homer’s focus on the lives of Americans, particularly previously-enslaved African Americans, make for important historical viewing. Winslow Homer’s interest in depicting conflict remained a constant throughout his career even as he travelled outside the United States, painting scenes of resistance in the English town of Cullercoats on the North-East coast, and against the lush backdrop of Caribbean vegetation. The exhibition itself is part of a series by The National Gallery introducing major American artists to UK audiences, and is organised in conjunction with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature is showing at The National Gallery from 10th September until 8th January 2023

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
09/09/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this September
Scattered Nimbus, Josh Raz, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie at Ronchini Gallery

London-based fine artist Josh Raz’s first solo exhibition at Ronchini Gallery reimagine the way that artists conceptualise landscapes. Here, the human figures in the landscape are more than just decoration; they are the essential focal point through which the scenery is viewed, “consider[ing] how a landscape may be internalised and changed through the experiences of different individuals within the same collective narrative”. Rather than accurately showing the landscape as it physically appears, Raz instead painted surroundings as they are seen by the figures observing them, frequently depicting the same view from various perspectives. Through these various interpersonal visions of the world, Raz also encourages viewers to consider the temporal context of the land, and the generations of people it has been home to. This explicitly ephemeral view of landscapes characterises the work throughout Trails Through a Reverie, and represents a unique new approach to the art form

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie is showing at Ronchini Gallery until 6th October

Witching Hour, Cristian Avram, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Cristian Avram: Lapse at Workplace

Serving as something of a counterpoint to Josh Raz’s exhibition, Workplace Gallery’s Lapse takes a different approach to landscapes. The last UK solo show of Romanian artist Cristian Avram, Lapse depicts domestic interiors stripped of human presence, implied only by the objects and shadows they have left behind. Avram creates these stripped-down interiors by taking photos of his daily life and removing everything he considers a superfluous detail. People serve not as the focal point of Avram’s paintings, but as the implied non-presence that could interrupt the tranquillity of the scene at any point, subverting the supposed hierarchy between figure, place and object. Similarly, the objects within Avram’s compositions reflect the history of his home country, with products of the developing capitalist society existing alongside indicators of the nation’s Soviet past; where Raz’s landscapes embrace their inherent ephemerality, Avram’s paintings depict “timeless images that capture glimpses of ordinary human activity against the vastness of the world and its history”.

Cristian Avram: Lapse is showing at Workplace Gallery until 8th October

The Twain Shall Meet, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, 2015 (Acrylic and xerox transfers on paper)

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro

Coinciding with the publication of her major new book The Story of Art Without Men on 8th September, Katy Hessel has curated the exhibition The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro. While the book explores women artists across the last 500 years of art history, the exhibition at Victoria Miro is based on its final chapter of the same name, bringing together a selection of women artists who have defined the contemporary art movement over the past two decades. Across the various works on display, Hessel’s exhibition covers figuration, abstraction, sculpture and installation, all by women artists who focus on tackling the inequalities of the art world, from reimagining concepts of utopia and dystopia to rewriting and decolonising art history. Featuring work by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, María Berrío, Somaya Critchlow, Tracey Emin, Jadé Fadojutimi, Chantal Joffe, Julie Mehretu, Zanele Muholi, Wangechi Mutu, Celia Paul, Deborah Roberts, Khadija Saye, Sarah Sze and Flora Yukhnovich, The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written presents a direct challenge to the perceived artistic ‘canon’ of the twenty-first century.

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written is showing at Victoria Miro from 8th September until 1st October

The Gulf Stream, Winslow Homer, 1899

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature at The National Gallery

Opening on 10th September, The National Gallery presents the first ever UK exhibition of American realist painter Winslow Homer (1836-1920). Homer’s career in the final decades of the nineteenth century confronted some of the major social issues facing the United States at the time, with the artist living through the American Civil War, abolition of slavery and conflict with Spain, the last of the European colonial powers in the Americas. The issues he addressed - race, conflict, and the relationship between humans and the natural world - are still relevant to modern viewers, and Homer’s focus on the lives of Americans, particularly previously-enslaved African Americans, make for important historical viewing. Winslow Homer’s interest in depicting conflict remained a constant throughout his career even as he travelled outside the United States, painting scenes of resistance in the English town of Cullercoats on the North-East coast, and against the lush backdrop of Caribbean vegetation. The exhibition itself is part of a series by The National Gallery introducing major American artists to UK audiences, and is organised in conjunction with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature is showing at The National Gallery from 10th September until 8th January 2023

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
09/09/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this September
Presenting the best art on display in the capital this month
Scattered Nimbus, Josh Raz, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie at Ronchini Gallery

London-based fine artist Josh Raz’s first solo exhibition at Ronchini Gallery reimagine the way that artists conceptualise landscapes. Here, the human figures in the landscape are more than just decoration; they are the essential focal point through which the scenery is viewed, “consider[ing] how a landscape may be internalised and changed through the experiences of different individuals within the same collective narrative”. Rather than accurately showing the landscape as it physically appears, Raz instead painted surroundings as they are seen by the figures observing them, frequently depicting the same view from various perspectives. Through these various interpersonal visions of the world, Raz also encourages viewers to consider the temporal context of the land, and the generations of people it has been home to. This explicitly ephemeral view of landscapes characterises the work throughout Trails Through a Reverie, and represents a unique new approach to the art form

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie is showing at Ronchini Gallery until 6th October

Witching Hour, Cristian Avram, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Cristian Avram: Lapse at Workplace

Serving as something of a counterpoint to Josh Raz’s exhibition, Workplace Gallery’s Lapse takes a different approach to landscapes. The last UK solo show of Romanian artist Cristian Avram, Lapse depicts domestic interiors stripped of human presence, implied only by the objects and shadows they have left behind. Avram creates these stripped-down interiors by taking photos of his daily life and removing everything he considers a superfluous detail. People serve not as the focal point of Avram’s paintings, but as the implied non-presence that could interrupt the tranquillity of the scene at any point, subverting the supposed hierarchy between figure, place and object. Similarly, the objects within Avram’s compositions reflect the history of his home country, with products of the developing capitalist society existing alongside indicators of the nation’s Soviet past; where Raz’s landscapes embrace their inherent ephemerality, Avram’s paintings depict “timeless images that capture glimpses of ordinary human activity against the vastness of the world and its history”.

Cristian Avram: Lapse is showing at Workplace Gallery until 8th October

The Twain Shall Meet, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, 2015 (Acrylic and xerox transfers on paper)

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro

Coinciding with the publication of her major new book The Story of Art Without Men on 8th September, Katy Hessel has curated the exhibition The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro. While the book explores women artists across the last 500 years of art history, the exhibition at Victoria Miro is based on its final chapter of the same name, bringing together a selection of women artists who have defined the contemporary art movement over the past two decades. Across the various works on display, Hessel’s exhibition covers figuration, abstraction, sculpture and installation, all by women artists who focus on tackling the inequalities of the art world, from reimagining concepts of utopia and dystopia to rewriting and decolonising art history. Featuring work by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, María Berrío, Somaya Critchlow, Tracey Emin, Jadé Fadojutimi, Chantal Joffe, Julie Mehretu, Zanele Muholi, Wangechi Mutu, Celia Paul, Deborah Roberts, Khadija Saye, Sarah Sze and Flora Yukhnovich, The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written presents a direct challenge to the perceived artistic ‘canon’ of the twenty-first century.

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written is showing at Victoria Miro from 8th September until 1st October

The Gulf Stream, Winslow Homer, 1899

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature at The National Gallery

Opening on 10th September, The National Gallery presents the first ever UK exhibition of American realist painter Winslow Homer (1836-1920). Homer’s career in the final decades of the nineteenth century confronted some of the major social issues facing the United States at the time, with the artist living through the American Civil War, abolition of slavery and conflict with Spain, the last of the European colonial powers in the Americas. The issues he addressed - race, conflict, and the relationship between humans and the natural world - are still relevant to modern viewers, and Homer’s focus on the lives of Americans, particularly previously-enslaved African Americans, make for important historical viewing. Winslow Homer’s interest in depicting conflict remained a constant throughout his career even as he travelled outside the United States, painting scenes of resistance in the English town of Cullercoats on the North-East coast, and against the lush backdrop of Caribbean vegetation. The exhibition itself is part of a series by The National Gallery introducing major American artists to UK audiences, and is organised in conjunction with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature is showing at The National Gallery from 10th September until 8th January 2023

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Collect your 5 yamos below
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09/09/2022
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Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this September
Presenting the best art on display in the capital this month
Scattered Nimbus, Josh Raz, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie at Ronchini Gallery

London-based fine artist Josh Raz’s first solo exhibition at Ronchini Gallery reimagine the way that artists conceptualise landscapes. Here, the human figures in the landscape are more than just decoration; they are the essential focal point through which the scenery is viewed, “consider[ing] how a landscape may be internalised and changed through the experiences of different individuals within the same collective narrative”. Rather than accurately showing the landscape as it physically appears, Raz instead painted surroundings as they are seen by the figures observing them, frequently depicting the same view from various perspectives. Through these various interpersonal visions of the world, Raz also encourages viewers to consider the temporal context of the land, and the generations of people it has been home to. This explicitly ephemeral view of landscapes characterises the work throughout Trails Through a Reverie, and represents a unique new approach to the art form

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie is showing at Ronchini Gallery until 6th October

Witching Hour, Cristian Avram, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Cristian Avram: Lapse at Workplace

Serving as something of a counterpoint to Josh Raz’s exhibition, Workplace Gallery’s Lapse takes a different approach to landscapes. The last UK solo show of Romanian artist Cristian Avram, Lapse depicts domestic interiors stripped of human presence, implied only by the objects and shadows they have left behind. Avram creates these stripped-down interiors by taking photos of his daily life and removing everything he considers a superfluous detail. People serve not as the focal point of Avram’s paintings, but as the implied non-presence that could interrupt the tranquillity of the scene at any point, subverting the supposed hierarchy between figure, place and object. Similarly, the objects within Avram’s compositions reflect the history of his home country, with products of the developing capitalist society existing alongside indicators of the nation’s Soviet past; where Raz’s landscapes embrace their inherent ephemerality, Avram’s paintings depict “timeless images that capture glimpses of ordinary human activity against the vastness of the world and its history”.

Cristian Avram: Lapse is showing at Workplace Gallery until 8th October

The Twain Shall Meet, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, 2015 (Acrylic and xerox transfers on paper)

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro

Coinciding with the publication of her major new book The Story of Art Without Men on 8th September, Katy Hessel has curated the exhibition The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro. While the book explores women artists across the last 500 years of art history, the exhibition at Victoria Miro is based on its final chapter of the same name, bringing together a selection of women artists who have defined the contemporary art movement over the past two decades. Across the various works on display, Hessel’s exhibition covers figuration, abstraction, sculpture and installation, all by women artists who focus on tackling the inequalities of the art world, from reimagining concepts of utopia and dystopia to rewriting and decolonising art history. Featuring work by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, María Berrío, Somaya Critchlow, Tracey Emin, Jadé Fadojutimi, Chantal Joffe, Julie Mehretu, Zanele Muholi, Wangechi Mutu, Celia Paul, Deborah Roberts, Khadija Saye, Sarah Sze and Flora Yukhnovich, The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written presents a direct challenge to the perceived artistic ‘canon’ of the twenty-first century.

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written is showing at Victoria Miro from 8th September until 1st October

The Gulf Stream, Winslow Homer, 1899

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature at The National Gallery

Opening on 10th September, The National Gallery presents the first ever UK exhibition of American realist painter Winslow Homer (1836-1920). Homer’s career in the final decades of the nineteenth century confronted some of the major social issues facing the United States at the time, with the artist living through the American Civil War, abolition of slavery and conflict with Spain, the last of the European colonial powers in the Americas. The issues he addressed - race, conflict, and the relationship between humans and the natural world - are still relevant to modern viewers, and Homer’s focus on the lives of Americans, particularly previously-enslaved African Americans, make for important historical viewing. Winslow Homer’s interest in depicting conflict remained a constant throughout his career even as he travelled outside the United States, painting scenes of resistance in the English town of Cullercoats on the North-East coast, and against the lush backdrop of Caribbean vegetation. The exhibition itself is part of a series by The National Gallery introducing major American artists to UK audiences, and is organised in conjunction with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature is showing at The National Gallery from 10th September until 8th January 2023

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
09/09/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this September
Presenting the best art on display in the capital this month
Scattered Nimbus, Josh Raz, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie at Ronchini Gallery

London-based fine artist Josh Raz’s first solo exhibition at Ronchini Gallery reimagine the way that artists conceptualise landscapes. Here, the human figures in the landscape are more than just decoration; they are the essential focal point through which the scenery is viewed, “consider[ing] how a landscape may be internalised and changed through the experiences of different individuals within the same collective narrative”. Rather than accurately showing the landscape as it physically appears, Raz instead painted surroundings as they are seen by the figures observing them, frequently depicting the same view from various perspectives. Through these various interpersonal visions of the world, Raz also encourages viewers to consider the temporal context of the land, and the generations of people it has been home to. This explicitly ephemeral view of landscapes characterises the work throughout Trails Through a Reverie, and represents a unique new approach to the art form

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie is showing at Ronchini Gallery until 6th October

Witching Hour, Cristian Avram, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Cristian Avram: Lapse at Workplace

Serving as something of a counterpoint to Josh Raz’s exhibition, Workplace Gallery’s Lapse takes a different approach to landscapes. The last UK solo show of Romanian artist Cristian Avram, Lapse depicts domestic interiors stripped of human presence, implied only by the objects and shadows they have left behind. Avram creates these stripped-down interiors by taking photos of his daily life and removing everything he considers a superfluous detail. People serve not as the focal point of Avram’s paintings, but as the implied non-presence that could interrupt the tranquillity of the scene at any point, subverting the supposed hierarchy between figure, place and object. Similarly, the objects within Avram’s compositions reflect the history of his home country, with products of the developing capitalist society existing alongside indicators of the nation’s Soviet past; where Raz’s landscapes embrace their inherent ephemerality, Avram’s paintings depict “timeless images that capture glimpses of ordinary human activity against the vastness of the world and its history”.

Cristian Avram: Lapse is showing at Workplace Gallery until 8th October

The Twain Shall Meet, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, 2015 (Acrylic and xerox transfers on paper)

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro

Coinciding with the publication of her major new book The Story of Art Without Men on 8th September, Katy Hessel has curated the exhibition The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro. While the book explores women artists across the last 500 years of art history, the exhibition at Victoria Miro is based on its final chapter of the same name, bringing together a selection of women artists who have defined the contemporary art movement over the past two decades. Across the various works on display, Hessel’s exhibition covers figuration, abstraction, sculpture and installation, all by women artists who focus on tackling the inequalities of the art world, from reimagining concepts of utopia and dystopia to rewriting and decolonising art history. Featuring work by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, María Berrío, Somaya Critchlow, Tracey Emin, Jadé Fadojutimi, Chantal Joffe, Julie Mehretu, Zanele Muholi, Wangechi Mutu, Celia Paul, Deborah Roberts, Khadija Saye, Sarah Sze and Flora Yukhnovich, The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written presents a direct challenge to the perceived artistic ‘canon’ of the twenty-first century.

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written is showing at Victoria Miro from 8th September until 1st October

The Gulf Stream, Winslow Homer, 1899

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature at The National Gallery

Opening on 10th September, The National Gallery presents the first ever UK exhibition of American realist painter Winslow Homer (1836-1920). Homer’s career in the final decades of the nineteenth century confronted some of the major social issues facing the United States at the time, with the artist living through the American Civil War, abolition of slavery and conflict with Spain, the last of the European colonial powers in the Americas. The issues he addressed - race, conflict, and the relationship between humans and the natural world - are still relevant to modern viewers, and Homer’s focus on the lives of Americans, particularly previously-enslaved African Americans, make for important historical viewing. Winslow Homer’s interest in depicting conflict remained a constant throughout his career even as he travelled outside the United States, painting scenes of resistance in the English town of Cullercoats on the North-East coast, and against the lush backdrop of Caribbean vegetation. The exhibition itself is part of a series by The National Gallery introducing major American artists to UK audiences, and is organised in conjunction with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature is showing at The National Gallery from 10th September until 8th January 2023

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
09/09/2022
To Do
Adam Wells
Exhibitions to see in London this September
Presenting the best art on display in the capital this month
Scattered Nimbus, Josh Raz, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie at Ronchini Gallery

London-based fine artist Josh Raz’s first solo exhibition at Ronchini Gallery reimagine the way that artists conceptualise landscapes. Here, the human figures in the landscape are more than just decoration; they are the essential focal point through which the scenery is viewed, “consider[ing] how a landscape may be internalised and changed through the experiences of different individuals within the same collective narrative”. Rather than accurately showing the landscape as it physically appears, Raz instead painted surroundings as they are seen by the figures observing them, frequently depicting the same view from various perspectives. Through these various interpersonal visions of the world, Raz also encourages viewers to consider the temporal context of the land, and the generations of people it has been home to. This explicitly ephemeral view of landscapes characterises the work throughout Trails Through a Reverie, and represents a unique new approach to the art form

Josh Raz: Trails Through a Reverie is showing at Ronchini Gallery until 6th October

Witching Hour, Cristian Avram, 2022 (Oil on canvas)

Cristian Avram: Lapse at Workplace

Serving as something of a counterpoint to Josh Raz’s exhibition, Workplace Gallery’s Lapse takes a different approach to landscapes. The last UK solo show of Romanian artist Cristian Avram, Lapse depicts domestic interiors stripped of human presence, implied only by the objects and shadows they have left behind. Avram creates these stripped-down interiors by taking photos of his daily life and removing everything he considers a superfluous detail. People serve not as the focal point of Avram’s paintings, but as the implied non-presence that could interrupt the tranquillity of the scene at any point, subverting the supposed hierarchy between figure, place and object. Similarly, the objects within Avram’s compositions reflect the history of his home country, with products of the developing capitalist society existing alongside indicators of the nation’s Soviet past; where Raz’s landscapes embrace their inherent ephemerality, Avram’s paintings depict “timeless images that capture glimpses of ordinary human activity against the vastness of the world and its history”.

Cristian Avram: Lapse is showing at Workplace Gallery until 8th October

The Twain Shall Meet, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, 2015 (Acrylic and xerox transfers on paper)

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro

Coinciding with the publication of her major new book The Story of Art Without Men on 8th September, Katy Hessel has curated the exhibition The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written at Victoria Miro. While the book explores women artists across the last 500 years of art history, the exhibition at Victoria Miro is based on its final chapter of the same name, bringing together a selection of women artists who have defined the contemporary art movement over the past two decades. Across the various works on display, Hessel’s exhibition covers figuration, abstraction, sculpture and installation, all by women artists who focus on tackling the inequalities of the art world, from reimagining concepts of utopia and dystopia to rewriting and decolonising art history. Featuring work by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, María Berrío, Somaya Critchlow, Tracey Emin, Jadé Fadojutimi, Chantal Joffe, Julie Mehretu, Zanele Muholi, Wangechi Mutu, Celia Paul, Deborah Roberts, Khadija Saye, Sarah Sze and Flora Yukhnovich, The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written presents a direct challenge to the perceived artistic ‘canon’ of the twenty-first century.

The Story of Art as it’s Still Being Written is showing at Victoria Miro from 8th September until 1st October

The Gulf Stream, Winslow Homer, 1899

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature at The National Gallery

Opening on 10th September, The National Gallery presents the first ever UK exhibition of American realist painter Winslow Homer (1836-1920). Homer’s career in the final decades of the nineteenth century confronted some of the major social issues facing the United States at the time, with the artist living through the American Civil War, abolition of slavery and conflict with Spain, the last of the European colonial powers in the Americas. The issues he addressed - race, conflict, and the relationship between humans and the natural world - are still relevant to modern viewers, and Homer’s focus on the lives of Americans, particularly previously-enslaved African Americans, make for important historical viewing. Winslow Homer’s interest in depicting conflict remained a constant throughout his career even as he travelled outside the United States, painting scenes of resistance in the English town of Cullercoats on the North-East coast, and against the lush backdrop of Caribbean vegetation. The exhibition itself is part of a series by The National Gallery introducing major American artists to UK audiences, and is organised in conjunction with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature is showing at The National Gallery from 10th September until 8th January 2023

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
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