19/10/2022
To Do
Jelena Sofronijevic
Conversations on the Thames: Curation Around the River
We take a look at the best exhibitions currently showing around the Thames...

The Thames is truly the lifeblood of London, a source of exchange of goods, services and transport to which the capital owes its very existence. And now, five exhibitions around the river curate works in conversation, bringing to the forefront silenced voices and histories in art and history more widely.

Sculpture, Seyni Awa Camara, (21st c.)

You may come to the White Cube in Bermondsey for Michael Armitage, but you’ll also stay for Seyni Awa Camara. Produced in her home in Senegal, her tall, plural people are awesome, clay heads sculpted by hand, and built on the shoulders and bodies of a community. Giving Birth, a thirty minute documentary and interview with the artist by Fatou Kande Senghor, is worth your full attention. Assertive in her talent, she expresses great gratitude towards her family, without whom she couldn’t make her art.

Septimius Severus, Elena Onwochei-Garcia (21st c.) | Arthur Roberts, Chloe Cox (21st c.)

A short walk away is the all-new Africa Centre, recently restored and relocated from its original home in Covent Garden. Painting our Past shows portraits commissioned for English Heritage sites across the UK, displayed together for the first time. The earliest figure – the Roman Septimius Severus, as portrayed by Elena Onwochei-Garcia, sits directly opposite the latest image – of the World War I soldier Arthur Roberts, painted by Chloe Cox. Staring at each other, they sit in a sort of direct conversation, of the silencing of Black figures from British history.

An X-Ray of the Painting Praxitella, Wyndham Lewis, (1921)

Inside the nearby Courtauld Gallery is a new exhibition dedicated to Helen Saunders, one of two women within the short-lived Vorticist movement of the First World War. Almost all of her artworks – and her reputation and impact – have been lost, contributing to the historical obscurity she and so many women artists endure. With X-ray technology, conservationists have discovered one of her works beneath Wyndham Lewis’ Praxitella (1921). Concise but diverse, the Courtauld’s display adds layers to the history of the art movement. A portrait of the artist by Lewis himself highlights how he not only painted over her contribution to Vorticism, but personally ended their friendship and correspondence, for no discernible reason. Bringing these silenced conversations to light, we see Saunders’ quiet feminism, and interaction with patriarchal society more widely, as well as her undervalued role in articulating the movement.

Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Cup, Paul Cezanne, (1866)

Along with the sculptor Jacob Epstein, Saunders deeply engaged with the work of Paul Cezanne, visiting (and documenting) his studio in L’Estaque in the 1920s. A vast retrospective of his work is currently on show at the Tate Modern – and it is as good as its reputation. Beyond the Bathers, its dense curation features diaries, old palettes, quotes, and grand paintings, avidly discussed and debated by those packed into the space. Testaments from living artists discuss his continued legacy as ‘the artist’s artist’. A tiny room that feels like a warm hug shows how he was revered in his time, collected by the likes of Picasso and Matisse, who called him as a ‘father’, ‘protector’, and someone who ‘sustained’ them.

Still Life With Fruit Dish, Paul Cezanne, (1879-1880)

Another conversation takes place in the second room, where we see the artist’s experimentation in style, showing his dynamic change (not progress) from the dark, violent, and ‘ballsy’ impasto of Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Club (1865-1870) to Fruit Dish (1879-1880), a work once owned by Gauguin. Like the exhibition, they serve as gentle reminders that less privileged and marginalised artists do not necessarily receive the same lavish curatorial treatment, reinforcing a cycle that prevents them being so equally adored in the hearts, minds, and mouths of the public. 

Michael Armitage: Amongst the Living, with Seyni Awa Camara is on view at the White Cube Bermondsey until 30 October 2022.

Painting our Past: The African Diaspora in England is on view at The Africa Centre until 28 October 2022. 

Helen Saunders: Modernist Rebel is on view at the Courtauld Gallery until 29 January 2023, and A Modern Masterpiece Uncovered: Wyndham Lewis, Helen Saunders and Praxitella until 12 February 2023.

The EY Exhibition: Cezanne is on view at the Tate Modern until 12 March 2023.

Remember to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with each visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/10/2022
To Do
Jelena Sofronijevic
Conversations on the Thames: Curation Around the River
We take a look at the best exhibitions currently showing around the Thames...

The Thames is truly the lifeblood of London, a source of exchange of goods, services and transport to which the capital owes its very existence. And now, five exhibitions around the river curate works in conversation, bringing to the forefront silenced voices and histories in art and history more widely.

Sculpture, Seyni Awa Camara, (21st c.)

You may come to the White Cube in Bermondsey for Michael Armitage, but you’ll also stay for Seyni Awa Camara. Produced in her home in Senegal, her tall, plural people are awesome, clay heads sculpted by hand, and built on the shoulders and bodies of a community. Giving Birth, a thirty minute documentary and interview with the artist by Fatou Kande Senghor, is worth your full attention. Assertive in her talent, she expresses great gratitude towards her family, without whom she couldn’t make her art.

Septimius Severus, Elena Onwochei-Garcia (21st c.) | Arthur Roberts, Chloe Cox (21st c.)

A short walk away is the all-new Africa Centre, recently restored and relocated from its original home in Covent Garden. Painting our Past shows portraits commissioned for English Heritage sites across the UK, displayed together for the first time. The earliest figure – the Roman Septimius Severus, as portrayed by Elena Onwochei-Garcia, sits directly opposite the latest image – of the World War I soldier Arthur Roberts, painted by Chloe Cox. Staring at each other, they sit in a sort of direct conversation, of the silencing of Black figures from British history.

An X-Ray of the Painting Praxitella, Wyndham Lewis, (1921)

Inside the nearby Courtauld Gallery is a new exhibition dedicated to Helen Saunders, one of two women within the short-lived Vorticist movement of the First World War. Almost all of her artworks – and her reputation and impact – have been lost, contributing to the historical obscurity she and so many women artists endure. With X-ray technology, conservationists have discovered one of her works beneath Wyndham Lewis’ Praxitella (1921). Concise but diverse, the Courtauld’s display adds layers to the history of the art movement. A portrait of the artist by Lewis himself highlights how he not only painted over her contribution to Vorticism, but personally ended their friendship and correspondence, for no discernible reason. Bringing these silenced conversations to light, we see Saunders’ quiet feminism, and interaction with patriarchal society more widely, as well as her undervalued role in articulating the movement.

Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Cup, Paul Cezanne, (1866)

Along with the sculptor Jacob Epstein, Saunders deeply engaged with the work of Paul Cezanne, visiting (and documenting) his studio in L’Estaque in the 1920s. A vast retrospective of his work is currently on show at the Tate Modern – and it is as good as its reputation. Beyond the Bathers, its dense curation features diaries, old palettes, quotes, and grand paintings, avidly discussed and debated by those packed into the space. Testaments from living artists discuss his continued legacy as ‘the artist’s artist’. A tiny room that feels like a warm hug shows how he was revered in his time, collected by the likes of Picasso and Matisse, who called him as a ‘father’, ‘protector’, and someone who ‘sustained’ them.

Still Life With Fruit Dish, Paul Cezanne, (1879-1880)

Another conversation takes place in the second room, where we see the artist’s experimentation in style, showing his dynamic change (not progress) from the dark, violent, and ‘ballsy’ impasto of Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Club (1865-1870) to Fruit Dish (1879-1880), a work once owned by Gauguin. Like the exhibition, they serve as gentle reminders that less privileged and marginalised artists do not necessarily receive the same lavish curatorial treatment, reinforcing a cycle that prevents them being so equally adored in the hearts, minds, and mouths of the public. 

Michael Armitage: Amongst the Living, with Seyni Awa Camara is on view at the White Cube Bermondsey until 30 October 2022.

Painting our Past: The African Diaspora in England is on view at The Africa Centre until 28 October 2022. 

Helen Saunders: Modernist Rebel is on view at the Courtauld Gallery until 29 January 2023, and A Modern Masterpiece Uncovered: Wyndham Lewis, Helen Saunders and Praxitella until 12 February 2023.

The EY Exhibition: Cezanne is on view at the Tate Modern until 12 March 2023.

Remember to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with each visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/10/2022
To Do
Jelena Sofronijevic
Conversations on the Thames: Curation Around the River
We take a look at the best exhibitions currently showing around the Thames...

The Thames is truly the lifeblood of London, a source of exchange of goods, services and transport to which the capital owes its very existence. And now, five exhibitions around the river curate works in conversation, bringing to the forefront silenced voices and histories in art and history more widely.

Sculpture, Seyni Awa Camara, (21st c.)

You may come to the White Cube in Bermondsey for Michael Armitage, but you’ll also stay for Seyni Awa Camara. Produced in her home in Senegal, her tall, plural people are awesome, clay heads sculpted by hand, and built on the shoulders and bodies of a community. Giving Birth, a thirty minute documentary and interview with the artist by Fatou Kande Senghor, is worth your full attention. Assertive in her talent, she expresses great gratitude towards her family, without whom she couldn’t make her art.

Septimius Severus, Elena Onwochei-Garcia (21st c.) | Arthur Roberts, Chloe Cox (21st c.)

A short walk away is the all-new Africa Centre, recently restored and relocated from its original home in Covent Garden. Painting our Past shows portraits commissioned for English Heritage sites across the UK, displayed together for the first time. The earliest figure – the Roman Septimius Severus, as portrayed by Elena Onwochei-Garcia, sits directly opposite the latest image – of the World War I soldier Arthur Roberts, painted by Chloe Cox. Staring at each other, they sit in a sort of direct conversation, of the silencing of Black figures from British history.

An X-Ray of the Painting Praxitella, Wyndham Lewis, (1921)

Inside the nearby Courtauld Gallery is a new exhibition dedicated to Helen Saunders, one of two women within the short-lived Vorticist movement of the First World War. Almost all of her artworks – and her reputation and impact – have been lost, contributing to the historical obscurity she and so many women artists endure. With X-ray technology, conservationists have discovered one of her works beneath Wyndham Lewis’ Praxitella (1921). Concise but diverse, the Courtauld’s display adds layers to the history of the art movement. A portrait of the artist by Lewis himself highlights how he not only painted over her contribution to Vorticism, but personally ended their friendship and correspondence, for no discernible reason. Bringing these silenced conversations to light, we see Saunders’ quiet feminism, and interaction with patriarchal society more widely, as well as her undervalued role in articulating the movement.

Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Cup, Paul Cezanne, (1866)

Along with the sculptor Jacob Epstein, Saunders deeply engaged with the work of Paul Cezanne, visiting (and documenting) his studio in L’Estaque in the 1920s. A vast retrospective of his work is currently on show at the Tate Modern – and it is as good as its reputation. Beyond the Bathers, its dense curation features diaries, old palettes, quotes, and grand paintings, avidly discussed and debated by those packed into the space. Testaments from living artists discuss his continued legacy as ‘the artist’s artist’. A tiny room that feels like a warm hug shows how he was revered in his time, collected by the likes of Picasso and Matisse, who called him as a ‘father’, ‘protector’, and someone who ‘sustained’ them.

Still Life With Fruit Dish, Paul Cezanne, (1879-1880)

Another conversation takes place in the second room, where we see the artist’s experimentation in style, showing his dynamic change (not progress) from the dark, violent, and ‘ballsy’ impasto of Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Club (1865-1870) to Fruit Dish (1879-1880), a work once owned by Gauguin. Like the exhibition, they serve as gentle reminders that less privileged and marginalised artists do not necessarily receive the same lavish curatorial treatment, reinforcing a cycle that prevents them being so equally adored in the hearts, minds, and mouths of the public. 

Michael Armitage: Amongst the Living, with Seyni Awa Camara is on view at the White Cube Bermondsey until 30 October 2022.

Painting our Past: The African Diaspora in England is on view at The Africa Centre until 28 October 2022. 

Helen Saunders: Modernist Rebel is on view at the Courtauld Gallery until 29 January 2023, and A Modern Masterpiece Uncovered: Wyndham Lewis, Helen Saunders and Praxitella until 12 February 2023.

The EY Exhibition: Cezanne is on view at the Tate Modern until 12 March 2023.

Remember to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with each visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/10/2022
To Do
Jelena Sofronijevic
Conversations on the Thames: Curation Around the River
We take a look at the best exhibitions currently showing around the Thames...

The Thames is truly the lifeblood of London, a source of exchange of goods, services and transport to which the capital owes its very existence. And now, five exhibitions around the river curate works in conversation, bringing to the forefront silenced voices and histories in art and history more widely.

Sculpture, Seyni Awa Camara, (21st c.)

You may come to the White Cube in Bermondsey for Michael Armitage, but you’ll also stay for Seyni Awa Camara. Produced in her home in Senegal, her tall, plural people are awesome, clay heads sculpted by hand, and built on the shoulders and bodies of a community. Giving Birth, a thirty minute documentary and interview with the artist by Fatou Kande Senghor, is worth your full attention. Assertive in her talent, she expresses great gratitude towards her family, without whom she couldn’t make her art.

Septimius Severus, Elena Onwochei-Garcia (21st c.) | Arthur Roberts, Chloe Cox (21st c.)

A short walk away is the all-new Africa Centre, recently restored and relocated from its original home in Covent Garden. Painting our Past shows portraits commissioned for English Heritage sites across the UK, displayed together for the first time. The earliest figure – the Roman Septimius Severus, as portrayed by Elena Onwochei-Garcia, sits directly opposite the latest image – of the World War I soldier Arthur Roberts, painted by Chloe Cox. Staring at each other, they sit in a sort of direct conversation, of the silencing of Black figures from British history.

An X-Ray of the Painting Praxitella, Wyndham Lewis, (1921)

Inside the nearby Courtauld Gallery is a new exhibition dedicated to Helen Saunders, one of two women within the short-lived Vorticist movement of the First World War. Almost all of her artworks – and her reputation and impact – have been lost, contributing to the historical obscurity she and so many women artists endure. With X-ray technology, conservationists have discovered one of her works beneath Wyndham Lewis’ Praxitella (1921). Concise but diverse, the Courtauld’s display adds layers to the history of the art movement. A portrait of the artist by Lewis himself highlights how he not only painted over her contribution to Vorticism, but personally ended their friendship and correspondence, for no discernible reason. Bringing these silenced conversations to light, we see Saunders’ quiet feminism, and interaction with patriarchal society more widely, as well as her undervalued role in articulating the movement.

Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Cup, Paul Cezanne, (1866)

Along with the sculptor Jacob Epstein, Saunders deeply engaged with the work of Paul Cezanne, visiting (and documenting) his studio in L’Estaque in the 1920s. A vast retrospective of his work is currently on show at the Tate Modern – and it is as good as its reputation. Beyond the Bathers, its dense curation features diaries, old palettes, quotes, and grand paintings, avidly discussed and debated by those packed into the space. Testaments from living artists discuss his continued legacy as ‘the artist’s artist’. A tiny room that feels like a warm hug shows how he was revered in his time, collected by the likes of Picasso and Matisse, who called him as a ‘father’, ‘protector’, and someone who ‘sustained’ them.

Still Life With Fruit Dish, Paul Cezanne, (1879-1880)

Another conversation takes place in the second room, where we see the artist’s experimentation in style, showing his dynamic change (not progress) from the dark, violent, and ‘ballsy’ impasto of Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Club (1865-1870) to Fruit Dish (1879-1880), a work once owned by Gauguin. Like the exhibition, they serve as gentle reminders that less privileged and marginalised artists do not necessarily receive the same lavish curatorial treatment, reinforcing a cycle that prevents them being so equally adored in the hearts, minds, and mouths of the public. 

Michael Armitage: Amongst the Living, with Seyni Awa Camara is on view at the White Cube Bermondsey until 30 October 2022.

Painting our Past: The African Diaspora in England is on view at The Africa Centre until 28 October 2022. 

Helen Saunders: Modernist Rebel is on view at the Courtauld Gallery until 29 January 2023, and A Modern Masterpiece Uncovered: Wyndham Lewis, Helen Saunders and Praxitella until 12 February 2023.

The EY Exhibition: Cezanne is on view at the Tate Modern until 12 March 2023.

Remember to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with each visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/10/2022
To Do
Jelena Sofronijevic
Conversations on the Thames: Curation Around the River
We take a look at the best exhibitions currently showing around the Thames...

The Thames is truly the lifeblood of London, a source of exchange of goods, services and transport to which the capital owes its very existence. And now, five exhibitions around the river curate works in conversation, bringing to the forefront silenced voices and histories in art and history more widely.

Sculpture, Seyni Awa Camara, (21st c.)

You may come to the White Cube in Bermondsey for Michael Armitage, but you’ll also stay for Seyni Awa Camara. Produced in her home in Senegal, her tall, plural people are awesome, clay heads sculpted by hand, and built on the shoulders and bodies of a community. Giving Birth, a thirty minute documentary and interview with the artist by Fatou Kande Senghor, is worth your full attention. Assertive in her talent, she expresses great gratitude towards her family, without whom she couldn’t make her art.

Septimius Severus, Elena Onwochei-Garcia (21st c.) | Arthur Roberts, Chloe Cox (21st c.)

A short walk away is the all-new Africa Centre, recently restored and relocated from its original home in Covent Garden. Painting our Past shows portraits commissioned for English Heritage sites across the UK, displayed together for the first time. The earliest figure – the Roman Septimius Severus, as portrayed by Elena Onwochei-Garcia, sits directly opposite the latest image – of the World War I soldier Arthur Roberts, painted by Chloe Cox. Staring at each other, they sit in a sort of direct conversation, of the silencing of Black figures from British history.

An X-Ray of the Painting Praxitella, Wyndham Lewis, (1921)

Inside the nearby Courtauld Gallery is a new exhibition dedicated to Helen Saunders, one of two women within the short-lived Vorticist movement of the First World War. Almost all of her artworks – and her reputation and impact – have been lost, contributing to the historical obscurity she and so many women artists endure. With X-ray technology, conservationists have discovered one of her works beneath Wyndham Lewis’ Praxitella (1921). Concise but diverse, the Courtauld’s display adds layers to the history of the art movement. A portrait of the artist by Lewis himself highlights how he not only painted over her contribution to Vorticism, but personally ended their friendship and correspondence, for no discernible reason. Bringing these silenced conversations to light, we see Saunders’ quiet feminism, and interaction with patriarchal society more widely, as well as her undervalued role in articulating the movement.

Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Cup, Paul Cezanne, (1866)

Along with the sculptor Jacob Epstein, Saunders deeply engaged with the work of Paul Cezanne, visiting (and documenting) his studio in L’Estaque in the 1920s. A vast retrospective of his work is currently on show at the Tate Modern – and it is as good as its reputation. Beyond the Bathers, its dense curation features diaries, old palettes, quotes, and grand paintings, avidly discussed and debated by those packed into the space. Testaments from living artists discuss his continued legacy as ‘the artist’s artist’. A tiny room that feels like a warm hug shows how he was revered in his time, collected by the likes of Picasso and Matisse, who called him as a ‘father’, ‘protector’, and someone who ‘sustained’ them.

Still Life With Fruit Dish, Paul Cezanne, (1879-1880)

Another conversation takes place in the second room, where we see the artist’s experimentation in style, showing his dynamic change (not progress) from the dark, violent, and ‘ballsy’ impasto of Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Club (1865-1870) to Fruit Dish (1879-1880), a work once owned by Gauguin. Like the exhibition, they serve as gentle reminders that less privileged and marginalised artists do not necessarily receive the same lavish curatorial treatment, reinforcing a cycle that prevents them being so equally adored in the hearts, minds, and mouths of the public. 

Michael Armitage: Amongst the Living, with Seyni Awa Camara is on view at the White Cube Bermondsey until 30 October 2022.

Painting our Past: The African Diaspora in England is on view at The Africa Centre until 28 October 2022. 

Helen Saunders: Modernist Rebel is on view at the Courtauld Gallery until 29 January 2023, and A Modern Masterpiece Uncovered: Wyndham Lewis, Helen Saunders and Praxitella until 12 February 2023.

The EY Exhibition: Cezanne is on view at the Tate Modern until 12 March 2023.

Remember to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with each visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/10/2022
To Do
Jelena Sofronijevic
Conversations on the Thames: Curation Around the River

The Thames is truly the lifeblood of London, a source of exchange of goods, services and transport to which the capital owes its very existence. And now, five exhibitions around the river curate works in conversation, bringing to the forefront silenced voices and histories in art and history more widely.

Sculpture, Seyni Awa Camara, (21st c.)

You may come to the White Cube in Bermondsey for Michael Armitage, but you’ll also stay for Seyni Awa Camara. Produced in her home in Senegal, her tall, plural people are awesome, clay heads sculpted by hand, and built on the shoulders and bodies of a community. Giving Birth, a thirty minute documentary and interview with the artist by Fatou Kande Senghor, is worth your full attention. Assertive in her talent, she expresses great gratitude towards her family, without whom she couldn’t make her art.

Septimius Severus, Elena Onwochei-Garcia (21st c.) | Arthur Roberts, Chloe Cox (21st c.)

A short walk away is the all-new Africa Centre, recently restored and relocated from its original home in Covent Garden. Painting our Past shows portraits commissioned for English Heritage sites across the UK, displayed together for the first time. The earliest figure – the Roman Septimius Severus, as portrayed by Elena Onwochei-Garcia, sits directly opposite the latest image – of the World War I soldier Arthur Roberts, painted by Chloe Cox. Staring at each other, they sit in a sort of direct conversation, of the silencing of Black figures from British history.

An X-Ray of the Painting Praxitella, Wyndham Lewis, (1921)

Inside the nearby Courtauld Gallery is a new exhibition dedicated to Helen Saunders, one of two women within the short-lived Vorticist movement of the First World War. Almost all of her artworks – and her reputation and impact – have been lost, contributing to the historical obscurity she and so many women artists endure. With X-ray technology, conservationists have discovered one of her works beneath Wyndham Lewis’ Praxitella (1921). Concise but diverse, the Courtauld’s display adds layers to the history of the art movement. A portrait of the artist by Lewis himself highlights how he not only painted over her contribution to Vorticism, but personally ended their friendship and correspondence, for no discernible reason. Bringing these silenced conversations to light, we see Saunders’ quiet feminism, and interaction with patriarchal society more widely, as well as her undervalued role in articulating the movement.

Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Cup, Paul Cezanne, (1866)

Along with the sculptor Jacob Epstein, Saunders deeply engaged with the work of Paul Cezanne, visiting (and documenting) his studio in L’Estaque in the 1920s. A vast retrospective of his work is currently on show at the Tate Modern – and it is as good as its reputation. Beyond the Bathers, its dense curation features diaries, old palettes, quotes, and grand paintings, avidly discussed and debated by those packed into the space. Testaments from living artists discuss his continued legacy as ‘the artist’s artist’. A tiny room that feels like a warm hug shows how he was revered in his time, collected by the likes of Picasso and Matisse, who called him as a ‘father’, ‘protector’, and someone who ‘sustained’ them.

Still Life With Fruit Dish, Paul Cezanne, (1879-1880)

Another conversation takes place in the second room, where we see the artist’s experimentation in style, showing his dynamic change (not progress) from the dark, violent, and ‘ballsy’ impasto of Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Club (1865-1870) to Fruit Dish (1879-1880), a work once owned by Gauguin. Like the exhibition, they serve as gentle reminders that less privileged and marginalised artists do not necessarily receive the same lavish curatorial treatment, reinforcing a cycle that prevents them being so equally adored in the hearts, minds, and mouths of the public. 

Michael Armitage: Amongst the Living, with Seyni Awa Camara is on view at the White Cube Bermondsey until 30 October 2022.

Painting our Past: The African Diaspora in England is on view at The Africa Centre until 28 October 2022. 

Helen Saunders: Modernist Rebel is on view at the Courtauld Gallery until 29 January 2023, and A Modern Masterpiece Uncovered: Wyndham Lewis, Helen Saunders and Praxitella until 12 February 2023.

The EY Exhibition: Cezanne is on view at the Tate Modern until 12 March 2023.

Remember to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with each visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/10/2022
To Do
Jelena Sofronijevic
Conversations on the Thames: Curation Around the River
We take a look at the best exhibitions currently showing around the Thames...

The Thames is truly the lifeblood of London, a source of exchange of goods, services and transport to which the capital owes its very existence. And now, five exhibitions around the river curate works in conversation, bringing to the forefront silenced voices and histories in art and history more widely.

Sculpture, Seyni Awa Camara, (21st c.)

You may come to the White Cube in Bermondsey for Michael Armitage, but you’ll also stay for Seyni Awa Camara. Produced in her home in Senegal, her tall, plural people are awesome, clay heads sculpted by hand, and built on the shoulders and bodies of a community. Giving Birth, a thirty minute documentary and interview with the artist by Fatou Kande Senghor, is worth your full attention. Assertive in her talent, she expresses great gratitude towards her family, without whom she couldn’t make her art.

Septimius Severus, Elena Onwochei-Garcia (21st c.) | Arthur Roberts, Chloe Cox (21st c.)

A short walk away is the all-new Africa Centre, recently restored and relocated from its original home in Covent Garden. Painting our Past shows portraits commissioned for English Heritage sites across the UK, displayed together for the first time. The earliest figure – the Roman Septimius Severus, as portrayed by Elena Onwochei-Garcia, sits directly opposite the latest image – of the World War I soldier Arthur Roberts, painted by Chloe Cox. Staring at each other, they sit in a sort of direct conversation, of the silencing of Black figures from British history.

An X-Ray of the Painting Praxitella, Wyndham Lewis, (1921)

Inside the nearby Courtauld Gallery is a new exhibition dedicated to Helen Saunders, one of two women within the short-lived Vorticist movement of the First World War. Almost all of her artworks – and her reputation and impact – have been lost, contributing to the historical obscurity she and so many women artists endure. With X-ray technology, conservationists have discovered one of her works beneath Wyndham Lewis’ Praxitella (1921). Concise but diverse, the Courtauld’s display adds layers to the history of the art movement. A portrait of the artist by Lewis himself highlights how he not only painted over her contribution to Vorticism, but personally ended their friendship and correspondence, for no discernible reason. Bringing these silenced conversations to light, we see Saunders’ quiet feminism, and interaction with patriarchal society more widely, as well as her undervalued role in articulating the movement.

Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Cup, Paul Cezanne, (1866)

Along with the sculptor Jacob Epstein, Saunders deeply engaged with the work of Paul Cezanne, visiting (and documenting) his studio in L’Estaque in the 1920s. A vast retrospective of his work is currently on show at the Tate Modern – and it is as good as its reputation. Beyond the Bathers, its dense curation features diaries, old palettes, quotes, and grand paintings, avidly discussed and debated by those packed into the space. Testaments from living artists discuss his continued legacy as ‘the artist’s artist’. A tiny room that feels like a warm hug shows how he was revered in his time, collected by the likes of Picasso and Matisse, who called him as a ‘father’, ‘protector’, and someone who ‘sustained’ them.

Still Life With Fruit Dish, Paul Cezanne, (1879-1880)

Another conversation takes place in the second room, where we see the artist’s experimentation in style, showing his dynamic change (not progress) from the dark, violent, and ‘ballsy’ impasto of Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Club (1865-1870) to Fruit Dish (1879-1880), a work once owned by Gauguin. Like the exhibition, they serve as gentle reminders that less privileged and marginalised artists do not necessarily receive the same lavish curatorial treatment, reinforcing a cycle that prevents them being so equally adored in the hearts, minds, and mouths of the public. 

Michael Armitage: Amongst the Living, with Seyni Awa Camara is on view at the White Cube Bermondsey until 30 October 2022.

Painting our Past: The African Diaspora in England is on view at The Africa Centre until 28 October 2022. 

Helen Saunders: Modernist Rebel is on view at the Courtauld Gallery until 29 January 2023, and A Modern Masterpiece Uncovered: Wyndham Lewis, Helen Saunders and Praxitella until 12 February 2023.

The EY Exhibition: Cezanne is on view at the Tate Modern until 12 March 2023.

Remember to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with each visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/10/2022
To Do
Jelena Sofronijevic
Conversations on the Thames: Curation Around the River
We take a look at the best exhibitions currently showing around the Thames...

The Thames is truly the lifeblood of London, a source of exchange of goods, services and transport to which the capital owes its very existence. And now, five exhibitions around the river curate works in conversation, bringing to the forefront silenced voices and histories in art and history more widely.

Sculpture, Seyni Awa Camara, (21st c.)

You may come to the White Cube in Bermondsey for Michael Armitage, but you’ll also stay for Seyni Awa Camara. Produced in her home in Senegal, her tall, plural people are awesome, clay heads sculpted by hand, and built on the shoulders and bodies of a community. Giving Birth, a thirty minute documentary and interview with the artist by Fatou Kande Senghor, is worth your full attention. Assertive in her talent, she expresses great gratitude towards her family, without whom she couldn’t make her art.

Septimius Severus, Elena Onwochei-Garcia (21st c.) | Arthur Roberts, Chloe Cox (21st c.)

A short walk away is the all-new Africa Centre, recently restored and relocated from its original home in Covent Garden. Painting our Past shows portraits commissioned for English Heritage sites across the UK, displayed together for the first time. The earliest figure – the Roman Septimius Severus, as portrayed by Elena Onwochei-Garcia, sits directly opposite the latest image – of the World War I soldier Arthur Roberts, painted by Chloe Cox. Staring at each other, they sit in a sort of direct conversation, of the silencing of Black figures from British history.

An X-Ray of the Painting Praxitella, Wyndham Lewis, (1921)

Inside the nearby Courtauld Gallery is a new exhibition dedicated to Helen Saunders, one of two women within the short-lived Vorticist movement of the First World War. Almost all of her artworks – and her reputation and impact – have been lost, contributing to the historical obscurity she and so many women artists endure. With X-ray technology, conservationists have discovered one of her works beneath Wyndham Lewis’ Praxitella (1921). Concise but diverse, the Courtauld’s display adds layers to the history of the art movement. A portrait of the artist by Lewis himself highlights how he not only painted over her contribution to Vorticism, but personally ended their friendship and correspondence, for no discernible reason. Bringing these silenced conversations to light, we see Saunders’ quiet feminism, and interaction with patriarchal society more widely, as well as her undervalued role in articulating the movement.

Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Cup, Paul Cezanne, (1866)

Along with the sculptor Jacob Epstein, Saunders deeply engaged with the work of Paul Cezanne, visiting (and documenting) his studio in L’Estaque in the 1920s. A vast retrospective of his work is currently on show at the Tate Modern – and it is as good as its reputation. Beyond the Bathers, its dense curation features diaries, old palettes, quotes, and grand paintings, avidly discussed and debated by those packed into the space. Testaments from living artists discuss his continued legacy as ‘the artist’s artist’. A tiny room that feels like a warm hug shows how he was revered in his time, collected by the likes of Picasso and Matisse, who called him as a ‘father’, ‘protector’, and someone who ‘sustained’ them.

Still Life With Fruit Dish, Paul Cezanne, (1879-1880)

Another conversation takes place in the second room, where we see the artist’s experimentation in style, showing his dynamic change (not progress) from the dark, violent, and ‘ballsy’ impasto of Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Club (1865-1870) to Fruit Dish (1879-1880), a work once owned by Gauguin. Like the exhibition, they serve as gentle reminders that less privileged and marginalised artists do not necessarily receive the same lavish curatorial treatment, reinforcing a cycle that prevents them being so equally adored in the hearts, minds, and mouths of the public. 

Michael Armitage: Amongst the Living, with Seyni Awa Camara is on view at the White Cube Bermondsey until 30 October 2022.

Painting our Past: The African Diaspora in England is on view at The Africa Centre until 28 October 2022. 

Helen Saunders: Modernist Rebel is on view at the Courtauld Gallery until 29 January 2023, and A Modern Masterpiece Uncovered: Wyndham Lewis, Helen Saunders and Praxitella until 12 February 2023.

The EY Exhibition: Cezanne is on view at the Tate Modern until 12 March 2023.

Remember to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with each visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/10/2022
To Do
Jelena Sofronijevic
Conversations on the Thames: Curation Around the River
We take a look at the best exhibitions currently showing around the Thames...

The Thames is truly the lifeblood of London, a source of exchange of goods, services and transport to which the capital owes its very existence. And now, five exhibitions around the river curate works in conversation, bringing to the forefront silenced voices and histories in art and history more widely.

Sculpture, Seyni Awa Camara, (21st c.)

You may come to the White Cube in Bermondsey for Michael Armitage, but you’ll also stay for Seyni Awa Camara. Produced in her home in Senegal, her tall, plural people are awesome, clay heads sculpted by hand, and built on the shoulders and bodies of a community. Giving Birth, a thirty minute documentary and interview with the artist by Fatou Kande Senghor, is worth your full attention. Assertive in her talent, she expresses great gratitude towards her family, without whom she couldn’t make her art.

Septimius Severus, Elena Onwochei-Garcia (21st c.) | Arthur Roberts, Chloe Cox (21st c.)

A short walk away is the all-new Africa Centre, recently restored and relocated from its original home in Covent Garden. Painting our Past shows portraits commissioned for English Heritage sites across the UK, displayed together for the first time. The earliest figure – the Roman Septimius Severus, as portrayed by Elena Onwochei-Garcia, sits directly opposite the latest image – of the World War I soldier Arthur Roberts, painted by Chloe Cox. Staring at each other, they sit in a sort of direct conversation, of the silencing of Black figures from British history.

An X-Ray of the Painting Praxitella, Wyndham Lewis, (1921)

Inside the nearby Courtauld Gallery is a new exhibition dedicated to Helen Saunders, one of two women within the short-lived Vorticist movement of the First World War. Almost all of her artworks – and her reputation and impact – have been lost, contributing to the historical obscurity she and so many women artists endure. With X-ray technology, conservationists have discovered one of her works beneath Wyndham Lewis’ Praxitella (1921). Concise but diverse, the Courtauld’s display adds layers to the history of the art movement. A portrait of the artist by Lewis himself highlights how he not only painted over her contribution to Vorticism, but personally ended their friendship and correspondence, for no discernible reason. Bringing these silenced conversations to light, we see Saunders’ quiet feminism, and interaction with patriarchal society more widely, as well as her undervalued role in articulating the movement.

Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Cup, Paul Cezanne, (1866)

Along with the sculptor Jacob Epstein, Saunders deeply engaged with the work of Paul Cezanne, visiting (and documenting) his studio in L’Estaque in the 1920s. A vast retrospective of his work is currently on show at the Tate Modern – and it is as good as its reputation. Beyond the Bathers, its dense curation features diaries, old palettes, quotes, and grand paintings, avidly discussed and debated by those packed into the space. Testaments from living artists discuss his continued legacy as ‘the artist’s artist’. A tiny room that feels like a warm hug shows how he was revered in his time, collected by the likes of Picasso and Matisse, who called him as a ‘father’, ‘protector’, and someone who ‘sustained’ them.

Still Life With Fruit Dish, Paul Cezanne, (1879-1880)

Another conversation takes place in the second room, where we see the artist’s experimentation in style, showing his dynamic change (not progress) from the dark, violent, and ‘ballsy’ impasto of Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Club (1865-1870) to Fruit Dish (1879-1880), a work once owned by Gauguin. Like the exhibition, they serve as gentle reminders that less privileged and marginalised artists do not necessarily receive the same lavish curatorial treatment, reinforcing a cycle that prevents them being so equally adored in the hearts, minds, and mouths of the public. 

Michael Armitage: Amongst the Living, with Seyni Awa Camara is on view at the White Cube Bermondsey until 30 October 2022.

Painting our Past: The African Diaspora in England is on view at The Africa Centre until 28 October 2022. 

Helen Saunders: Modernist Rebel is on view at the Courtauld Gallery until 29 January 2023, and A Modern Masterpiece Uncovered: Wyndham Lewis, Helen Saunders and Praxitella until 12 February 2023.

The EY Exhibition: Cezanne is on view at the Tate Modern until 12 March 2023.

Remember to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with each visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
19/10/2022
To Do
Jelena Sofronijevic
Conversations on the Thames: Curation Around the River
We take a look at the best exhibitions currently showing around the Thames...

The Thames is truly the lifeblood of London, a source of exchange of goods, services and transport to which the capital owes its very existence. And now, five exhibitions around the river curate works in conversation, bringing to the forefront silenced voices and histories in art and history more widely.

Sculpture, Seyni Awa Camara, (21st c.)

You may come to the White Cube in Bermondsey for Michael Armitage, but you’ll also stay for Seyni Awa Camara. Produced in her home in Senegal, her tall, plural people are awesome, clay heads sculpted by hand, and built on the shoulders and bodies of a community. Giving Birth, a thirty minute documentary and interview with the artist by Fatou Kande Senghor, is worth your full attention. Assertive in her talent, she expresses great gratitude towards her family, without whom she couldn’t make her art.

Septimius Severus, Elena Onwochei-Garcia (21st c.) | Arthur Roberts, Chloe Cox (21st c.)

A short walk away is the all-new Africa Centre, recently restored and relocated from its original home in Covent Garden. Painting our Past shows portraits commissioned for English Heritage sites across the UK, displayed together for the first time. The earliest figure – the Roman Septimius Severus, as portrayed by Elena Onwochei-Garcia, sits directly opposite the latest image – of the World War I soldier Arthur Roberts, painted by Chloe Cox. Staring at each other, they sit in a sort of direct conversation, of the silencing of Black figures from British history.

An X-Ray of the Painting Praxitella, Wyndham Lewis, (1921)

Inside the nearby Courtauld Gallery is a new exhibition dedicated to Helen Saunders, one of two women within the short-lived Vorticist movement of the First World War. Almost all of her artworks – and her reputation and impact – have been lost, contributing to the historical obscurity she and so many women artists endure. With X-ray technology, conservationists have discovered one of her works beneath Wyndham Lewis’ Praxitella (1921). Concise but diverse, the Courtauld’s display adds layers to the history of the art movement. A portrait of the artist by Lewis himself highlights how he not only painted over her contribution to Vorticism, but personally ended their friendship and correspondence, for no discernible reason. Bringing these silenced conversations to light, we see Saunders’ quiet feminism, and interaction with patriarchal society more widely, as well as her undervalued role in articulating the movement.

Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Cup, Paul Cezanne, (1866)

Along with the sculptor Jacob Epstein, Saunders deeply engaged with the work of Paul Cezanne, visiting (and documenting) his studio in L’Estaque in the 1920s. A vast retrospective of his work is currently on show at the Tate Modern – and it is as good as its reputation. Beyond the Bathers, its dense curation features diaries, old palettes, quotes, and grand paintings, avidly discussed and debated by those packed into the space. Testaments from living artists discuss his continued legacy as ‘the artist’s artist’. A tiny room that feels like a warm hug shows how he was revered in his time, collected by the likes of Picasso and Matisse, who called him as a ‘father’, ‘protector’, and someone who ‘sustained’ them.

Still Life With Fruit Dish, Paul Cezanne, (1879-1880)

Another conversation takes place in the second room, where we see the artist’s experimentation in style, showing his dynamic change (not progress) from the dark, violent, and ‘ballsy’ impasto of Sugar Bowl, Pears and Blue Club (1865-1870) to Fruit Dish (1879-1880), a work once owned by Gauguin. Like the exhibition, they serve as gentle reminders that less privileged and marginalised artists do not necessarily receive the same lavish curatorial treatment, reinforcing a cycle that prevents them being so equally adored in the hearts, minds, and mouths of the public. 

Michael Armitage: Amongst the Living, with Seyni Awa Camara is on view at the White Cube Bermondsey until 30 October 2022.

Painting our Past: The African Diaspora in England is on view at The Africa Centre until 28 October 2022. 

Helen Saunders: Modernist Rebel is on view at the Courtauld Gallery until 29 January 2023, and A Modern Masterpiece Uncovered: Wyndham Lewis, Helen Saunders and Praxitella until 12 February 2023.

The EY Exhibition: Cezanne is on view at the Tate Modern until 12 March 2023.

Remember to collect your Yamos on the gowithYamo app with each visit!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
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