25/02/2021
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Lisa-Marie Price

Lisa-Marie Price is a London based artist that explores the connection between nature, people and place. She looks at how we interact with each other and develops work that portrays the intricacies between them. Her methodical style is created using watercolour sourced from pigment that she forages on her journeys. There is often a personalised element to her work focusing on geographical areas that are important to her and of those that commission her work.

We are giving away this unframed piece by Lisa-Marie to one of our lucky followers! To enter, click here and follow the instructions. The winner will be announced on the 18th of March. Good luck!

Cataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed
View fullsizeCataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed

What is your artistic background and how did you become an artist?

I guess I have always felt like an artist, or at least have always loved art and was one of the only things I felt I succeeded at and had a real passion for. I would say it was two years ago when I finally felt confident to tell people “I’m an artist” when they asked what “I did”. I studied Fine Art at university in London, mainly creating installation work, and as much as I loved art school I think most of my learning has come after. It has been 12 years since I left and over that time I have worked many art related jobs. Finally in 2017 I opened my own studio teaching art to children and adults. Lockdown has been a tricky time (as I can’t teach) and my art journey has transitioned during this time allowing me to focus on my art practice full time.

Un-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeUn-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What do you wish to convey through your artworks?

As my work is very abstract you wouldn’t know at first glance that my paintings have a much deeper meaning behind them. My passion for a healthier planet and a kinder society plays an important role in my work. I ultimately want to spread a message advocating for positive change in our environment, how we treat it and how we each have a personal duty to preserve it. I want people to reflect on their own lives, their consumption and if they can, make small changes to make our world a cleaner, more compassionate and healthier planet to live on.

What made you decide to go vegan and how has it impacted your art?

In 2017 I joined Veganuary, an initiative started to encourage people to try being vegan for a month in January. I joined on a bit of a whim when my boyfriend suggested we should give it a go after he’d seen a poster on the tube. I was a meat eater at the time and had never really thought about going vegan but I am quite competitive and a bit stubborn so I thought, why not, I can do this! I can honestly say I really had no idea at the time how much it would not only impact my life but also my how much it would redefine my art. I love learning new little bits of information and I love reading so I took to all the information I could get my hands on to find out “why should I be vegan?” The more I read the more I found out about our environment, our [human] impact on our planet, the climate crisis, not to mention all the helpless animals. It got me thinking about my personal impact and how I can minimise my negative actions on our planet through staying vegan. Learning about our over consumption was why I started to make my own watercolour and stopped buying shop bought paint. It got me thinking about our journeys and movement during our lives. It completely focused my practice. It gave it purpose and now the story behind my work is not only meaningful but it’s growing and evolving each time I make a new piece of work. I believe this constant growth is because my inspiration is true, all encompassing and part of my lifestyle as a whole.

20200928L-MP_ALUKALA-146.jpg
View fullsize

What is your favourite piece that you created and why?

Ooh this is a tricky one. I think it might be a painting I made back in March last year called ‘The Third Wave’, just before the first lockdown. I made it for an exhibition I was co-curating called #Fakenews and it was [at the time] the biggest painting I had ever made. Not only this but it was the first time I had made my own copper acetate; made from copper scraps, vinegar and salt. It makes a kind of green/blue colour and I just loved it straight away. The final and biggest reason this painting is my favourite is because it was one of the first times I felt really inspired to create a piece, not only from my walks, but also from being inspired by something that really meant something to me. I was reading a book called ‘The New North: The World in 2050’, it is a book about climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion. When I was reading about ‘The Third Wave’, a chapter that ‘imagine[s] a 2050 world in which global population has grown by nearly half, forming crowded urban clots around the hot lower latitude of our planet’, it compelled me to make a piece about it. At the time of creating this piece I felt like it was a turning point in my work and was the catalyst for where my practice is now.

The Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed
View fullsizeThe Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed

What does your creative process look like?

On a day to day basis my creative process is pretty methodical. I like to be organised and tidy and I tend to work between painting, researching and like everyone else…admin. Because of the style of my work I can’t paint for hours and hours at a time, it’s too painful, so I work in shorter bursts interspersed with paint making and going out for walks to forage for new pigment. To make my watercolour it’s quite a lengthy process. It requires patience, accuracy for the most part and a little bit of playfulness too. In short these are the steps I take to make my own natural watercolours. I walk, forage, collect, crush, grind, sieve, levigate, mull, mix, store, dry, test, record and label each pigment. This process can take weeks or even months, all before I can even sit down to make a new piece of work. That’s generally why I try to go between making my paint, painting new work and foraging for pigment; it allows me to have new paint to hand when I need it. When I do sit down to paint I start with a walk that I have recorded on my phone using an app, I draw out the walk and decide on what parts of it I want to use. If I can, I use the pigment I found on that particular walk but sometimes this isn’t possible. I am completely obsessed with painting tiny dots. I can’t explain this really, I guess I am a bit of a perfectionist so maybe this has something to do with it, but I can’t be sure! More recently I have been working on creating much larger pieces which is a lot of fun but also a big shift from my comfort zone of small scale work. The amount of dots that need painting has increased quite considerably too!

Naturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeNaturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What/who are you inspired by?

Inspiration for me comes in the form of the walks I take and the pigment I find on my walks. These walks often translate into the shapes you see in my work and the pigment I collect is made into watercolour so I can paint with them. The colours I use in my work are completely dictated by where I am in the world. I spent a fair amount of time in Scotland and the earth there is so vastly different to the pigment I find here in London. It allows me to connect to the land that I walk on and share those journeys through my paintings.

Also, as you can tell from my other answers I am also very much inspired by my experiences in the world, reading about our complex eco system and the desire to help change the world for the better for generations to come.

Do you have any upcoming projects?

Due to lockdown pretty much all of my exhibitions I had planned for the latter half of last year have been postponed until later this year. I will be exhibiting in D Contemporary Gallery in Mayfair, The Cello Factory in Southbank and at D’O Studio and Gallery in The Netherlands.

I will be part of are Unity Art Project who are raising money through an art auction for The Trussell Trust. I have been selected as one of the artists chosen to collaborate with them, painting onto their print made for the auction. Twenty artists in total will each use the print as the base for their piece. I will also be taking part in a yearly open studio event in my area, North London, called Crouch End Open Studios. Normally this takes place in May but due to COVID it’ll be pushed back to September.

Finally, I am hoping to learn how to make my own paper. I feel like this is the next natural step to becoming a wholly sustainable artist, which is my ultimate goal!

How can we keep up to date with your work?

The best way to keep up to date is either through following me on Instagram @theworkshopn4, I love an Instagram post! Or by signing up to my newsletter through my website www.lisamarieprice.co.uk

Thanks for reading and if you’d like to ask any questions about my practice or processes you can always drop me an email at lisapriceart@me.com

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
25/02/2021
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Lisa-Marie Price

Lisa-Marie Price is a London based artist that explores the connection between nature, people and place. She looks at how we interact with each other and develops work that portrays the intricacies between them. Her methodical style is created using watercolour sourced from pigment that she forages on her journeys. There is often a personalised element to her work focusing on geographical areas that are important to her and of those that commission her work.

We are giving away this unframed piece by Lisa-Marie to one of our lucky followers! To enter, click here and follow the instructions. The winner will be announced on the 18th of March. Good luck!

Cataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed
View fullsizeCataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed

What is your artistic background and how did you become an artist?

I guess I have always felt like an artist, or at least have always loved art and was one of the only things I felt I succeeded at and had a real passion for. I would say it was two years ago when I finally felt confident to tell people “I’m an artist” when they asked what “I did”. I studied Fine Art at university in London, mainly creating installation work, and as much as I loved art school I think most of my learning has come after. It has been 12 years since I left and over that time I have worked many art related jobs. Finally in 2017 I opened my own studio teaching art to children and adults. Lockdown has been a tricky time (as I can’t teach) and my art journey has transitioned during this time allowing me to focus on my art practice full time.

Un-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeUn-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What do you wish to convey through your artworks?

As my work is very abstract you wouldn’t know at first glance that my paintings have a much deeper meaning behind them. My passion for a healthier planet and a kinder society plays an important role in my work. I ultimately want to spread a message advocating for positive change in our environment, how we treat it and how we each have a personal duty to preserve it. I want people to reflect on their own lives, their consumption and if they can, make small changes to make our world a cleaner, more compassionate and healthier planet to live on.

What made you decide to go vegan and how has it impacted your art?

In 2017 I joined Veganuary, an initiative started to encourage people to try being vegan for a month in January. I joined on a bit of a whim when my boyfriend suggested we should give it a go after he’d seen a poster on the tube. I was a meat eater at the time and had never really thought about going vegan but I am quite competitive and a bit stubborn so I thought, why not, I can do this! I can honestly say I really had no idea at the time how much it would not only impact my life but also my how much it would redefine my art. I love learning new little bits of information and I love reading so I took to all the information I could get my hands on to find out “why should I be vegan?” The more I read the more I found out about our environment, our [human] impact on our planet, the climate crisis, not to mention all the helpless animals. It got me thinking about my personal impact and how I can minimise my negative actions on our planet through staying vegan. Learning about our over consumption was why I started to make my own watercolour and stopped buying shop bought paint. It got me thinking about our journeys and movement during our lives. It completely focused my practice. It gave it purpose and now the story behind my work is not only meaningful but it’s growing and evolving each time I make a new piece of work. I believe this constant growth is because my inspiration is true, all encompassing and part of my lifestyle as a whole.

20200928L-MP_ALUKALA-146.jpg
View fullsize

What is your favourite piece that you created and why?

Ooh this is a tricky one. I think it might be a painting I made back in March last year called ‘The Third Wave’, just before the first lockdown. I made it for an exhibition I was co-curating called #Fakenews and it was [at the time] the biggest painting I had ever made. Not only this but it was the first time I had made my own copper acetate; made from copper scraps, vinegar and salt. It makes a kind of green/blue colour and I just loved it straight away. The final and biggest reason this painting is my favourite is because it was one of the first times I felt really inspired to create a piece, not only from my walks, but also from being inspired by something that really meant something to me. I was reading a book called ‘The New North: The World in 2050’, it is a book about climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion. When I was reading about ‘The Third Wave’, a chapter that ‘imagine[s] a 2050 world in which global population has grown by nearly half, forming crowded urban clots around the hot lower latitude of our planet’, it compelled me to make a piece about it. At the time of creating this piece I felt like it was a turning point in my work and was the catalyst for where my practice is now.

The Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed
View fullsizeThe Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed

What does your creative process look like?

On a day to day basis my creative process is pretty methodical. I like to be organised and tidy and I tend to work between painting, researching and like everyone else…admin. Because of the style of my work I can’t paint for hours and hours at a time, it’s too painful, so I work in shorter bursts interspersed with paint making and going out for walks to forage for new pigment. To make my watercolour it’s quite a lengthy process. It requires patience, accuracy for the most part and a little bit of playfulness too. In short these are the steps I take to make my own natural watercolours. I walk, forage, collect, crush, grind, sieve, levigate, mull, mix, store, dry, test, record and label each pigment. This process can take weeks or even months, all before I can even sit down to make a new piece of work. That’s generally why I try to go between making my paint, painting new work and foraging for pigment; it allows me to have new paint to hand when I need it. When I do sit down to paint I start with a walk that I have recorded on my phone using an app, I draw out the walk and decide on what parts of it I want to use. If I can, I use the pigment I found on that particular walk but sometimes this isn’t possible. I am completely obsessed with painting tiny dots. I can’t explain this really, I guess I am a bit of a perfectionist so maybe this has something to do with it, but I can’t be sure! More recently I have been working on creating much larger pieces which is a lot of fun but also a big shift from my comfort zone of small scale work. The amount of dots that need painting has increased quite considerably too!

Naturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeNaturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What/who are you inspired by?

Inspiration for me comes in the form of the walks I take and the pigment I find on my walks. These walks often translate into the shapes you see in my work and the pigment I collect is made into watercolour so I can paint with them. The colours I use in my work are completely dictated by where I am in the world. I spent a fair amount of time in Scotland and the earth there is so vastly different to the pigment I find here in London. It allows me to connect to the land that I walk on and share those journeys through my paintings.

Also, as you can tell from my other answers I am also very much inspired by my experiences in the world, reading about our complex eco system and the desire to help change the world for the better for generations to come.

Do you have any upcoming projects?

Due to lockdown pretty much all of my exhibitions I had planned for the latter half of last year have been postponed until later this year. I will be exhibiting in D Contemporary Gallery in Mayfair, The Cello Factory in Southbank and at D’O Studio and Gallery in The Netherlands.

I will be part of are Unity Art Project who are raising money through an art auction for The Trussell Trust. I have been selected as one of the artists chosen to collaborate with them, painting onto their print made for the auction. Twenty artists in total will each use the print as the base for their piece. I will also be taking part in a yearly open studio event in my area, North London, called Crouch End Open Studios. Normally this takes place in May but due to COVID it’ll be pushed back to September.

Finally, I am hoping to learn how to make my own paper. I feel like this is the next natural step to becoming a wholly sustainable artist, which is my ultimate goal!

How can we keep up to date with your work?

The best way to keep up to date is either through following me on Instagram @theworkshopn4, I love an Instagram post! Or by signing up to my newsletter through my website www.lisamarieprice.co.uk

Thanks for reading and if you’d like to ask any questions about my practice or processes you can always drop me an email at lisapriceart@me.com

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
25/02/2021
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Lisa-Marie Price

Lisa-Marie Price is a London based artist that explores the connection between nature, people and place. She looks at how we interact with each other and develops work that portrays the intricacies between them. Her methodical style is created using watercolour sourced from pigment that she forages on her journeys. There is often a personalised element to her work focusing on geographical areas that are important to her and of those that commission her work.

We are giving away this unframed piece by Lisa-Marie to one of our lucky followers! To enter, click here and follow the instructions. The winner will be announced on the 18th of March. Good luck!

Cataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed
View fullsizeCataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed

What is your artistic background and how did you become an artist?

I guess I have always felt like an artist, or at least have always loved art and was one of the only things I felt I succeeded at and had a real passion for. I would say it was two years ago when I finally felt confident to tell people “I’m an artist” when they asked what “I did”. I studied Fine Art at university in London, mainly creating installation work, and as much as I loved art school I think most of my learning has come after. It has been 12 years since I left and over that time I have worked many art related jobs. Finally in 2017 I opened my own studio teaching art to children and adults. Lockdown has been a tricky time (as I can’t teach) and my art journey has transitioned during this time allowing me to focus on my art practice full time.

Un-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeUn-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What do you wish to convey through your artworks?

As my work is very abstract you wouldn’t know at first glance that my paintings have a much deeper meaning behind them. My passion for a healthier planet and a kinder society plays an important role in my work. I ultimately want to spread a message advocating for positive change in our environment, how we treat it and how we each have a personal duty to preserve it. I want people to reflect on their own lives, their consumption and if they can, make small changes to make our world a cleaner, more compassionate and healthier planet to live on.

What made you decide to go vegan and how has it impacted your art?

In 2017 I joined Veganuary, an initiative started to encourage people to try being vegan for a month in January. I joined on a bit of a whim when my boyfriend suggested we should give it a go after he’d seen a poster on the tube. I was a meat eater at the time and had never really thought about going vegan but I am quite competitive and a bit stubborn so I thought, why not, I can do this! I can honestly say I really had no idea at the time how much it would not only impact my life but also my how much it would redefine my art. I love learning new little bits of information and I love reading so I took to all the information I could get my hands on to find out “why should I be vegan?” The more I read the more I found out about our environment, our [human] impact on our planet, the climate crisis, not to mention all the helpless animals. It got me thinking about my personal impact and how I can minimise my negative actions on our planet through staying vegan. Learning about our over consumption was why I started to make my own watercolour and stopped buying shop bought paint. It got me thinking about our journeys and movement during our lives. It completely focused my practice. It gave it purpose and now the story behind my work is not only meaningful but it’s growing and evolving each time I make a new piece of work. I believe this constant growth is because my inspiration is true, all encompassing and part of my lifestyle as a whole.

20200928L-MP_ALUKALA-146.jpg
View fullsize

What is your favourite piece that you created and why?

Ooh this is a tricky one. I think it might be a painting I made back in March last year called ‘The Third Wave’, just before the first lockdown. I made it for an exhibition I was co-curating called #Fakenews and it was [at the time] the biggest painting I had ever made. Not only this but it was the first time I had made my own copper acetate; made from copper scraps, vinegar and salt. It makes a kind of green/blue colour and I just loved it straight away. The final and biggest reason this painting is my favourite is because it was one of the first times I felt really inspired to create a piece, not only from my walks, but also from being inspired by something that really meant something to me. I was reading a book called ‘The New North: The World in 2050’, it is a book about climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion. When I was reading about ‘The Third Wave’, a chapter that ‘imagine[s] a 2050 world in which global population has grown by nearly half, forming crowded urban clots around the hot lower latitude of our planet’, it compelled me to make a piece about it. At the time of creating this piece I felt like it was a turning point in my work and was the catalyst for where my practice is now.

The Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed
View fullsizeThe Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed

What does your creative process look like?

On a day to day basis my creative process is pretty methodical. I like to be organised and tidy and I tend to work between painting, researching and like everyone else…admin. Because of the style of my work I can’t paint for hours and hours at a time, it’s too painful, so I work in shorter bursts interspersed with paint making and going out for walks to forage for new pigment. To make my watercolour it’s quite a lengthy process. It requires patience, accuracy for the most part and a little bit of playfulness too. In short these are the steps I take to make my own natural watercolours. I walk, forage, collect, crush, grind, sieve, levigate, mull, mix, store, dry, test, record and label each pigment. This process can take weeks or even months, all before I can even sit down to make a new piece of work. That’s generally why I try to go between making my paint, painting new work and foraging for pigment; it allows me to have new paint to hand when I need it. When I do sit down to paint I start with a walk that I have recorded on my phone using an app, I draw out the walk and decide on what parts of it I want to use. If I can, I use the pigment I found on that particular walk but sometimes this isn’t possible. I am completely obsessed with painting tiny dots. I can’t explain this really, I guess I am a bit of a perfectionist so maybe this has something to do with it, but I can’t be sure! More recently I have been working on creating much larger pieces which is a lot of fun but also a big shift from my comfort zone of small scale work. The amount of dots that need painting has increased quite considerably too!

Naturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeNaturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What/who are you inspired by?

Inspiration for me comes in the form of the walks I take and the pigment I find on my walks. These walks often translate into the shapes you see in my work and the pigment I collect is made into watercolour so I can paint with them. The colours I use in my work are completely dictated by where I am in the world. I spent a fair amount of time in Scotland and the earth there is so vastly different to the pigment I find here in London. It allows me to connect to the land that I walk on and share those journeys through my paintings.

Also, as you can tell from my other answers I am also very much inspired by my experiences in the world, reading about our complex eco system and the desire to help change the world for the better for generations to come.

Do you have any upcoming projects?

Due to lockdown pretty much all of my exhibitions I had planned for the latter half of last year have been postponed until later this year. I will be exhibiting in D Contemporary Gallery in Mayfair, The Cello Factory in Southbank and at D’O Studio and Gallery in The Netherlands.

I will be part of are Unity Art Project who are raising money through an art auction for The Trussell Trust. I have been selected as one of the artists chosen to collaborate with them, painting onto their print made for the auction. Twenty artists in total will each use the print as the base for their piece. I will also be taking part in a yearly open studio event in my area, North London, called Crouch End Open Studios. Normally this takes place in May but due to COVID it’ll be pushed back to September.

Finally, I am hoping to learn how to make my own paper. I feel like this is the next natural step to becoming a wholly sustainable artist, which is my ultimate goal!

How can we keep up to date with your work?

The best way to keep up to date is either through following me on Instagram @theworkshopn4, I love an Instagram post! Or by signing up to my newsletter through my website www.lisamarieprice.co.uk

Thanks for reading and if you’d like to ask any questions about my practice or processes you can always drop me an email at lisapriceart@me.com

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
25/02/2021
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Lisa-Marie Price

Lisa-Marie Price is a London based artist that explores the connection between nature, people and place. She looks at how we interact with each other and develops work that portrays the intricacies between them. Her methodical style is created using watercolour sourced from pigment that she forages on her journeys. There is often a personalised element to her work focusing on geographical areas that are important to her and of those that commission her work.

We are giving away this unframed piece by Lisa-Marie to one of our lucky followers! To enter, click here and follow the instructions. The winner will be announced on the 18th of March. Good luck!

Cataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed
View fullsizeCataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed

What is your artistic background and how did you become an artist?

I guess I have always felt like an artist, or at least have always loved art and was one of the only things I felt I succeeded at and had a real passion for. I would say it was two years ago when I finally felt confident to tell people “I’m an artist” when they asked what “I did”. I studied Fine Art at university in London, mainly creating installation work, and as much as I loved art school I think most of my learning has come after. It has been 12 years since I left and over that time I have worked many art related jobs. Finally in 2017 I opened my own studio teaching art to children and adults. Lockdown has been a tricky time (as I can’t teach) and my art journey has transitioned during this time allowing me to focus on my art practice full time.

Un-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeUn-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What do you wish to convey through your artworks?

As my work is very abstract you wouldn’t know at first glance that my paintings have a much deeper meaning behind them. My passion for a healthier planet and a kinder society plays an important role in my work. I ultimately want to spread a message advocating for positive change in our environment, how we treat it and how we each have a personal duty to preserve it. I want people to reflect on their own lives, their consumption and if they can, make small changes to make our world a cleaner, more compassionate and healthier planet to live on.

What made you decide to go vegan and how has it impacted your art?

In 2017 I joined Veganuary, an initiative started to encourage people to try being vegan for a month in January. I joined on a bit of a whim when my boyfriend suggested we should give it a go after he’d seen a poster on the tube. I was a meat eater at the time and had never really thought about going vegan but I am quite competitive and a bit stubborn so I thought, why not, I can do this! I can honestly say I really had no idea at the time how much it would not only impact my life but also my how much it would redefine my art. I love learning new little bits of information and I love reading so I took to all the information I could get my hands on to find out “why should I be vegan?” The more I read the more I found out about our environment, our [human] impact on our planet, the climate crisis, not to mention all the helpless animals. It got me thinking about my personal impact and how I can minimise my negative actions on our planet through staying vegan. Learning about our over consumption was why I started to make my own watercolour and stopped buying shop bought paint. It got me thinking about our journeys and movement during our lives. It completely focused my practice. It gave it purpose and now the story behind my work is not only meaningful but it’s growing and evolving each time I make a new piece of work. I believe this constant growth is because my inspiration is true, all encompassing and part of my lifestyle as a whole.

20200928L-MP_ALUKALA-146.jpg
View fullsize

What is your favourite piece that you created and why?

Ooh this is a tricky one. I think it might be a painting I made back in March last year called ‘The Third Wave’, just before the first lockdown. I made it for an exhibition I was co-curating called #Fakenews and it was [at the time] the biggest painting I had ever made. Not only this but it was the first time I had made my own copper acetate; made from copper scraps, vinegar and salt. It makes a kind of green/blue colour and I just loved it straight away. The final and biggest reason this painting is my favourite is because it was one of the first times I felt really inspired to create a piece, not only from my walks, but also from being inspired by something that really meant something to me. I was reading a book called ‘The New North: The World in 2050’, it is a book about climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion. When I was reading about ‘The Third Wave’, a chapter that ‘imagine[s] a 2050 world in which global population has grown by nearly half, forming crowded urban clots around the hot lower latitude of our planet’, it compelled me to make a piece about it. At the time of creating this piece I felt like it was a turning point in my work and was the catalyst for where my practice is now.

The Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed
View fullsizeThe Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed

What does your creative process look like?

On a day to day basis my creative process is pretty methodical. I like to be organised and tidy and I tend to work between painting, researching and like everyone else…admin. Because of the style of my work I can’t paint for hours and hours at a time, it’s too painful, so I work in shorter bursts interspersed with paint making and going out for walks to forage for new pigment. To make my watercolour it’s quite a lengthy process. It requires patience, accuracy for the most part and a little bit of playfulness too. In short these are the steps I take to make my own natural watercolours. I walk, forage, collect, crush, grind, sieve, levigate, mull, mix, store, dry, test, record and label each pigment. This process can take weeks or even months, all before I can even sit down to make a new piece of work. That’s generally why I try to go between making my paint, painting new work and foraging for pigment; it allows me to have new paint to hand when I need it. When I do sit down to paint I start with a walk that I have recorded on my phone using an app, I draw out the walk and decide on what parts of it I want to use. If I can, I use the pigment I found on that particular walk but sometimes this isn’t possible. I am completely obsessed with painting tiny dots. I can’t explain this really, I guess I am a bit of a perfectionist so maybe this has something to do with it, but I can’t be sure! More recently I have been working on creating much larger pieces which is a lot of fun but also a big shift from my comfort zone of small scale work. The amount of dots that need painting has increased quite considerably too!

Naturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeNaturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What/who are you inspired by?

Inspiration for me comes in the form of the walks I take and the pigment I find on my walks. These walks often translate into the shapes you see in my work and the pigment I collect is made into watercolour so I can paint with them. The colours I use in my work are completely dictated by where I am in the world. I spent a fair amount of time in Scotland and the earth there is so vastly different to the pigment I find here in London. It allows me to connect to the land that I walk on and share those journeys through my paintings.

Also, as you can tell from my other answers I am also very much inspired by my experiences in the world, reading about our complex eco system and the desire to help change the world for the better for generations to come.

Do you have any upcoming projects?

Due to lockdown pretty much all of my exhibitions I had planned for the latter half of last year have been postponed until later this year. I will be exhibiting in D Contemporary Gallery in Mayfair, The Cello Factory in Southbank and at D’O Studio and Gallery in The Netherlands.

I will be part of are Unity Art Project who are raising money through an art auction for The Trussell Trust. I have been selected as one of the artists chosen to collaborate with them, painting onto their print made for the auction. Twenty artists in total will each use the print as the base for their piece. I will also be taking part in a yearly open studio event in my area, North London, called Crouch End Open Studios. Normally this takes place in May but due to COVID it’ll be pushed back to September.

Finally, I am hoping to learn how to make my own paper. I feel like this is the next natural step to becoming a wholly sustainable artist, which is my ultimate goal!

How can we keep up to date with your work?

The best way to keep up to date is either through following me on Instagram @theworkshopn4, I love an Instagram post! Or by signing up to my newsletter through my website www.lisamarieprice.co.uk

Thanks for reading and if you’d like to ask any questions about my practice or processes you can always drop me an email at lisapriceart@me.com

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
25/02/2021
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Lisa-Marie Price

Lisa-Marie Price is a London based artist that explores the connection between nature, people and place. She looks at how we interact with each other and develops work that portrays the intricacies between them. Her methodical style is created using watercolour sourced from pigment that she forages on her journeys. There is often a personalised element to her work focusing on geographical areas that are important to her and of those that commission her work.

We are giving away this unframed piece by Lisa-Marie to one of our lucky followers! To enter, click here and follow the instructions. The winner will be announced on the 18th of March. Good luck!

Cataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed
View fullsizeCataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed

What is your artistic background and how did you become an artist?

I guess I have always felt like an artist, or at least have always loved art and was one of the only things I felt I succeeded at and had a real passion for. I would say it was two years ago when I finally felt confident to tell people “I’m an artist” when they asked what “I did”. I studied Fine Art at university in London, mainly creating installation work, and as much as I loved art school I think most of my learning has come after. It has been 12 years since I left and over that time I have worked many art related jobs. Finally in 2017 I opened my own studio teaching art to children and adults. Lockdown has been a tricky time (as I can’t teach) and my art journey has transitioned during this time allowing me to focus on my art practice full time.

Un-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeUn-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What do you wish to convey through your artworks?

As my work is very abstract you wouldn’t know at first glance that my paintings have a much deeper meaning behind them. My passion for a healthier planet and a kinder society plays an important role in my work. I ultimately want to spread a message advocating for positive change in our environment, how we treat it and how we each have a personal duty to preserve it. I want people to reflect on their own lives, their consumption and if they can, make small changes to make our world a cleaner, more compassionate and healthier planet to live on.

What made you decide to go vegan and how has it impacted your art?

In 2017 I joined Veganuary, an initiative started to encourage people to try being vegan for a month in January. I joined on a bit of a whim when my boyfriend suggested we should give it a go after he’d seen a poster on the tube. I was a meat eater at the time and had never really thought about going vegan but I am quite competitive and a bit stubborn so I thought, why not, I can do this! I can honestly say I really had no idea at the time how much it would not only impact my life but also my how much it would redefine my art. I love learning new little bits of information and I love reading so I took to all the information I could get my hands on to find out “why should I be vegan?” The more I read the more I found out about our environment, our [human] impact on our planet, the climate crisis, not to mention all the helpless animals. It got me thinking about my personal impact and how I can minimise my negative actions on our planet through staying vegan. Learning about our over consumption was why I started to make my own watercolour and stopped buying shop bought paint. It got me thinking about our journeys and movement during our lives. It completely focused my practice. It gave it purpose and now the story behind my work is not only meaningful but it’s growing and evolving each time I make a new piece of work. I believe this constant growth is because my inspiration is true, all encompassing and part of my lifestyle as a whole.

20200928L-MP_ALUKALA-146.jpg
View fullsize

What is your favourite piece that you created and why?

Ooh this is a tricky one. I think it might be a painting I made back in March last year called ‘The Third Wave’, just before the first lockdown. I made it for an exhibition I was co-curating called #Fakenews and it was [at the time] the biggest painting I had ever made. Not only this but it was the first time I had made my own copper acetate; made from copper scraps, vinegar and salt. It makes a kind of green/blue colour and I just loved it straight away. The final and biggest reason this painting is my favourite is because it was one of the first times I felt really inspired to create a piece, not only from my walks, but also from being inspired by something that really meant something to me. I was reading a book called ‘The New North: The World in 2050’, it is a book about climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion. When I was reading about ‘The Third Wave’, a chapter that ‘imagine[s] a 2050 world in which global population has grown by nearly half, forming crowded urban clots around the hot lower latitude of our planet’, it compelled me to make a piece about it. At the time of creating this piece I felt like it was a turning point in my work and was the catalyst for where my practice is now.

The Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed
View fullsizeThe Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed

What does your creative process look like?

On a day to day basis my creative process is pretty methodical. I like to be organised and tidy and I tend to work between painting, researching and like everyone else…admin. Because of the style of my work I can’t paint for hours and hours at a time, it’s too painful, so I work in shorter bursts interspersed with paint making and going out for walks to forage for new pigment. To make my watercolour it’s quite a lengthy process. It requires patience, accuracy for the most part and a little bit of playfulness too. In short these are the steps I take to make my own natural watercolours. I walk, forage, collect, crush, grind, sieve, levigate, mull, mix, store, dry, test, record and label each pigment. This process can take weeks or even months, all before I can even sit down to make a new piece of work. That’s generally why I try to go between making my paint, painting new work and foraging for pigment; it allows me to have new paint to hand when I need it. When I do sit down to paint I start with a walk that I have recorded on my phone using an app, I draw out the walk and decide on what parts of it I want to use. If I can, I use the pigment I found on that particular walk but sometimes this isn’t possible. I am completely obsessed with painting tiny dots. I can’t explain this really, I guess I am a bit of a perfectionist so maybe this has something to do with it, but I can’t be sure! More recently I have been working on creating much larger pieces which is a lot of fun but also a big shift from my comfort zone of small scale work. The amount of dots that need painting has increased quite considerably too!

Naturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeNaturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What/who are you inspired by?

Inspiration for me comes in the form of the walks I take and the pigment I find on my walks. These walks often translate into the shapes you see in my work and the pigment I collect is made into watercolour so I can paint with them. The colours I use in my work are completely dictated by where I am in the world. I spent a fair amount of time in Scotland and the earth there is so vastly different to the pigment I find here in London. It allows me to connect to the land that I walk on and share those journeys through my paintings.

Also, as you can tell from my other answers I am also very much inspired by my experiences in the world, reading about our complex eco system and the desire to help change the world for the better for generations to come.

Do you have any upcoming projects?

Due to lockdown pretty much all of my exhibitions I had planned for the latter half of last year have been postponed until later this year. I will be exhibiting in D Contemporary Gallery in Mayfair, The Cello Factory in Southbank and at D’O Studio and Gallery in The Netherlands.

I will be part of are Unity Art Project who are raising money through an art auction for The Trussell Trust. I have been selected as one of the artists chosen to collaborate with them, painting onto their print made for the auction. Twenty artists in total will each use the print as the base for their piece. I will also be taking part in a yearly open studio event in my area, North London, called Crouch End Open Studios. Normally this takes place in May but due to COVID it’ll be pushed back to September.

Finally, I am hoping to learn how to make my own paper. I feel like this is the next natural step to becoming a wholly sustainable artist, which is my ultimate goal!

How can we keep up to date with your work?

The best way to keep up to date is either through following me on Instagram @theworkshopn4, I love an Instagram post! Or by signing up to my newsletter through my website www.lisamarieprice.co.uk

Thanks for reading and if you’d like to ask any questions about my practice or processes you can always drop me an email at lisapriceart@me.com

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
25/02/2021
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Lisa-Marie Price

Lisa-Marie Price is a London based artist that explores the connection between nature, people and place. She looks at how we interact with each other and develops work that portrays the intricacies between them. Her methodical style is created using watercolour sourced from pigment that she forages on her journeys. There is often a personalised element to her work focusing on geographical areas that are important to her and of those that commission her work.

We are giving away this unframed piece by Lisa-Marie to one of our lucky followers! To enter, click here and follow the instructions. The winner will be announced on the 18th of March. Good luck!

Cataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed
View fullsizeCataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed

What is your artistic background and how did you become an artist?

I guess I have always felt like an artist, or at least have always loved art and was one of the only things I felt I succeeded at and had a real passion for. I would say it was two years ago when I finally felt confident to tell people “I’m an artist” when they asked what “I did”. I studied Fine Art at university in London, mainly creating installation work, and as much as I loved art school I think most of my learning has come after. It has been 12 years since I left and over that time I have worked many art related jobs. Finally in 2017 I opened my own studio teaching art to children and adults. Lockdown has been a tricky time (as I can’t teach) and my art journey has transitioned during this time allowing me to focus on my art practice full time.

Un-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeUn-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What do you wish to convey through your artworks?

As my work is very abstract you wouldn’t know at first glance that my paintings have a much deeper meaning behind them. My passion for a healthier planet and a kinder society plays an important role in my work. I ultimately want to spread a message advocating for positive change in our environment, how we treat it and how we each have a personal duty to preserve it. I want people to reflect on their own lives, their consumption and if they can, make small changes to make our world a cleaner, more compassionate and healthier planet to live on.

What made you decide to go vegan and how has it impacted your art?

In 2017 I joined Veganuary, an initiative started to encourage people to try being vegan for a month in January. I joined on a bit of a whim when my boyfriend suggested we should give it a go after he’d seen a poster on the tube. I was a meat eater at the time and had never really thought about going vegan but I am quite competitive and a bit stubborn so I thought, why not, I can do this! I can honestly say I really had no idea at the time how much it would not only impact my life but also my how much it would redefine my art. I love learning new little bits of information and I love reading so I took to all the information I could get my hands on to find out “why should I be vegan?” The more I read the more I found out about our environment, our [human] impact on our planet, the climate crisis, not to mention all the helpless animals. It got me thinking about my personal impact and how I can minimise my negative actions on our planet through staying vegan. Learning about our over consumption was why I started to make my own watercolour and stopped buying shop bought paint. It got me thinking about our journeys and movement during our lives. It completely focused my practice. It gave it purpose and now the story behind my work is not only meaningful but it’s growing and evolving each time I make a new piece of work. I believe this constant growth is because my inspiration is true, all encompassing and part of my lifestyle as a whole.

20200928L-MP_ALUKALA-146.jpg
View fullsize

What is your favourite piece that you created and why?

Ooh this is a tricky one. I think it might be a painting I made back in March last year called ‘The Third Wave’, just before the first lockdown. I made it for an exhibition I was co-curating called #Fakenews and it was [at the time] the biggest painting I had ever made. Not only this but it was the first time I had made my own copper acetate; made from copper scraps, vinegar and salt. It makes a kind of green/blue colour and I just loved it straight away. The final and biggest reason this painting is my favourite is because it was one of the first times I felt really inspired to create a piece, not only from my walks, but also from being inspired by something that really meant something to me. I was reading a book called ‘The New North: The World in 2050’, it is a book about climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion. When I was reading about ‘The Third Wave’, a chapter that ‘imagine[s] a 2050 world in which global population has grown by nearly half, forming crowded urban clots around the hot lower latitude of our planet’, it compelled me to make a piece about it. At the time of creating this piece I felt like it was a turning point in my work and was the catalyst for where my practice is now.

The Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed
View fullsizeThe Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed

What does your creative process look like?

On a day to day basis my creative process is pretty methodical. I like to be organised and tidy and I tend to work between painting, researching and like everyone else…admin. Because of the style of my work I can’t paint for hours and hours at a time, it’s too painful, so I work in shorter bursts interspersed with paint making and going out for walks to forage for new pigment. To make my watercolour it’s quite a lengthy process. It requires patience, accuracy for the most part and a little bit of playfulness too. In short these are the steps I take to make my own natural watercolours. I walk, forage, collect, crush, grind, sieve, levigate, mull, mix, store, dry, test, record and label each pigment. This process can take weeks or even months, all before I can even sit down to make a new piece of work. That’s generally why I try to go between making my paint, painting new work and foraging for pigment; it allows me to have new paint to hand when I need it. When I do sit down to paint I start with a walk that I have recorded on my phone using an app, I draw out the walk and decide on what parts of it I want to use. If I can, I use the pigment I found on that particular walk but sometimes this isn’t possible. I am completely obsessed with painting tiny dots. I can’t explain this really, I guess I am a bit of a perfectionist so maybe this has something to do with it, but I can’t be sure! More recently I have been working on creating much larger pieces which is a lot of fun but also a big shift from my comfort zone of small scale work. The amount of dots that need painting has increased quite considerably too!

Naturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeNaturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What/who are you inspired by?

Inspiration for me comes in the form of the walks I take and the pigment I find on my walks. These walks often translate into the shapes you see in my work and the pigment I collect is made into watercolour so I can paint with them. The colours I use in my work are completely dictated by where I am in the world. I spent a fair amount of time in Scotland and the earth there is so vastly different to the pigment I find here in London. It allows me to connect to the land that I walk on and share those journeys through my paintings.

Also, as you can tell from my other answers I am also very much inspired by my experiences in the world, reading about our complex eco system and the desire to help change the world for the better for generations to come.

Do you have any upcoming projects?

Due to lockdown pretty much all of my exhibitions I had planned for the latter half of last year have been postponed until later this year. I will be exhibiting in D Contemporary Gallery in Mayfair, The Cello Factory in Southbank and at D’O Studio and Gallery in The Netherlands.

I will be part of are Unity Art Project who are raising money through an art auction for The Trussell Trust. I have been selected as one of the artists chosen to collaborate with them, painting onto their print made for the auction. Twenty artists in total will each use the print as the base for their piece. I will also be taking part in a yearly open studio event in my area, North London, called Crouch End Open Studios. Normally this takes place in May but due to COVID it’ll be pushed back to September.

Finally, I am hoping to learn how to make my own paper. I feel like this is the next natural step to becoming a wholly sustainable artist, which is my ultimate goal!

How can we keep up to date with your work?

The best way to keep up to date is either through following me on Instagram @theworkshopn4, I love an Instagram post! Or by signing up to my newsletter through my website www.lisamarieprice.co.uk

Thanks for reading and if you’d like to ask any questions about my practice or processes you can always drop me an email at lisapriceart@me.com

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
25/02/2021
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Lisa-Marie Price

Lisa-Marie Price is a London based artist that explores the connection between nature, people and place. She looks at how we interact with each other and develops work that portrays the intricacies between them. Her methodical style is created using watercolour sourced from pigment that she forages on her journeys. There is often a personalised element to her work focusing on geographical areas that are important to her and of those that commission her work.

We are giving away this unframed piece by Lisa-Marie to one of our lucky followers! To enter, click here and follow the instructions. The winner will be announced on the 18th of March. Good luck!

Cataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed
View fullsizeCataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed

What is your artistic background and how did you become an artist?

I guess I have always felt like an artist, or at least have always loved art and was one of the only things I felt I succeeded at and had a real passion for. I would say it was two years ago when I finally felt confident to tell people “I’m an artist” when they asked what “I did”. I studied Fine Art at university in London, mainly creating installation work, and as much as I loved art school I think most of my learning has come after. It has been 12 years since I left and over that time I have worked many art related jobs. Finally in 2017 I opened my own studio teaching art to children and adults. Lockdown has been a tricky time (as I can’t teach) and my art journey has transitioned during this time allowing me to focus on my art practice full time.

Un-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeUn-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What do you wish to convey through your artworks?

As my work is very abstract you wouldn’t know at first glance that my paintings have a much deeper meaning behind them. My passion for a healthier planet and a kinder society plays an important role in my work. I ultimately want to spread a message advocating for positive change in our environment, how we treat it and how we each have a personal duty to preserve it. I want people to reflect on their own lives, their consumption and if they can, make small changes to make our world a cleaner, more compassionate and healthier planet to live on.

What made you decide to go vegan and how has it impacted your art?

In 2017 I joined Veganuary, an initiative started to encourage people to try being vegan for a month in January. I joined on a bit of a whim when my boyfriend suggested we should give it a go after he’d seen a poster on the tube. I was a meat eater at the time and had never really thought about going vegan but I am quite competitive and a bit stubborn so I thought, why not, I can do this! I can honestly say I really had no idea at the time how much it would not only impact my life but also my how much it would redefine my art. I love learning new little bits of information and I love reading so I took to all the information I could get my hands on to find out “why should I be vegan?” The more I read the more I found out about our environment, our [human] impact on our planet, the climate crisis, not to mention all the helpless animals. It got me thinking about my personal impact and how I can minimise my negative actions on our planet through staying vegan. Learning about our over consumption was why I started to make my own watercolour and stopped buying shop bought paint. It got me thinking about our journeys and movement during our lives. It completely focused my practice. It gave it purpose and now the story behind my work is not only meaningful but it’s growing and evolving each time I make a new piece of work. I believe this constant growth is because my inspiration is true, all encompassing and part of my lifestyle as a whole.

20200928L-MP_ALUKALA-146.jpg
View fullsize

What is your favourite piece that you created and why?

Ooh this is a tricky one. I think it might be a painting I made back in March last year called ‘The Third Wave’, just before the first lockdown. I made it for an exhibition I was co-curating called #Fakenews and it was [at the time] the biggest painting I had ever made. Not only this but it was the first time I had made my own copper acetate; made from copper scraps, vinegar and salt. It makes a kind of green/blue colour and I just loved it straight away. The final and biggest reason this painting is my favourite is because it was one of the first times I felt really inspired to create a piece, not only from my walks, but also from being inspired by something that really meant something to me. I was reading a book called ‘The New North: The World in 2050’, it is a book about climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion. When I was reading about ‘The Third Wave’, a chapter that ‘imagine[s] a 2050 world in which global population has grown by nearly half, forming crowded urban clots around the hot lower latitude of our planet’, it compelled me to make a piece about it. At the time of creating this piece I felt like it was a turning point in my work and was the catalyst for where my practice is now.

The Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed
View fullsizeThe Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed

What does your creative process look like?

On a day to day basis my creative process is pretty methodical. I like to be organised and tidy and I tend to work between painting, researching and like everyone else…admin. Because of the style of my work I can’t paint for hours and hours at a time, it’s too painful, so I work in shorter bursts interspersed with paint making and going out for walks to forage for new pigment. To make my watercolour it’s quite a lengthy process. It requires patience, accuracy for the most part and a little bit of playfulness too. In short these are the steps I take to make my own natural watercolours. I walk, forage, collect, crush, grind, sieve, levigate, mull, mix, store, dry, test, record and label each pigment. This process can take weeks or even months, all before I can even sit down to make a new piece of work. That’s generally why I try to go between making my paint, painting new work and foraging for pigment; it allows me to have new paint to hand when I need it. When I do sit down to paint I start with a walk that I have recorded on my phone using an app, I draw out the walk and decide on what parts of it I want to use. If I can, I use the pigment I found on that particular walk but sometimes this isn’t possible. I am completely obsessed with painting tiny dots. I can’t explain this really, I guess I am a bit of a perfectionist so maybe this has something to do with it, but I can’t be sure! More recently I have been working on creating much larger pieces which is a lot of fun but also a big shift from my comfort zone of small scale work. The amount of dots that need painting has increased quite considerably too!

Naturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeNaturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What/who are you inspired by?

Inspiration for me comes in the form of the walks I take and the pigment I find on my walks. These walks often translate into the shapes you see in my work and the pigment I collect is made into watercolour so I can paint with them. The colours I use in my work are completely dictated by where I am in the world. I spent a fair amount of time in Scotland and the earth there is so vastly different to the pigment I find here in London. It allows me to connect to the land that I walk on and share those journeys through my paintings.

Also, as you can tell from my other answers I am also very much inspired by my experiences in the world, reading about our complex eco system and the desire to help change the world for the better for generations to come.

Do you have any upcoming projects?

Due to lockdown pretty much all of my exhibitions I had planned for the latter half of last year have been postponed until later this year. I will be exhibiting in D Contemporary Gallery in Mayfair, The Cello Factory in Southbank and at D’O Studio and Gallery in The Netherlands.

I will be part of are Unity Art Project who are raising money through an art auction for The Trussell Trust. I have been selected as one of the artists chosen to collaborate with them, painting onto their print made for the auction. Twenty artists in total will each use the print as the base for their piece. I will also be taking part in a yearly open studio event in my area, North London, called Crouch End Open Studios. Normally this takes place in May but due to COVID it’ll be pushed back to September.

Finally, I am hoping to learn how to make my own paper. I feel like this is the next natural step to becoming a wholly sustainable artist, which is my ultimate goal!

How can we keep up to date with your work?

The best way to keep up to date is either through following me on Instagram @theworkshopn4, I love an Instagram post! Or by signing up to my newsletter through my website www.lisamarieprice.co.uk

Thanks for reading and if you’d like to ask any questions about my practice or processes you can always drop me an email at lisapriceart@me.com

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
25/02/2021
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Lisa-Marie Price

Lisa-Marie Price is a London based artist that explores the connection between nature, people and place. She looks at how we interact with each other and develops work that portrays the intricacies between them. Her methodical style is created using watercolour sourced from pigment that she forages on her journeys. There is often a personalised element to her work focusing on geographical areas that are important to her and of those that commission her work.

We are giving away this unframed piece by Lisa-Marie to one of our lucky followers! To enter, click here and follow the instructions. The winner will be announced on the 18th of March. Good luck!

Cataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed
View fullsizeCataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed

What is your artistic background and how did you become an artist?

I guess I have always felt like an artist, or at least have always loved art and was one of the only things I felt I succeeded at and had a real passion for. I would say it was two years ago when I finally felt confident to tell people “I’m an artist” when they asked what “I did”. I studied Fine Art at university in London, mainly creating installation work, and as much as I loved art school I think most of my learning has come after. It has been 12 years since I left and over that time I have worked many art related jobs. Finally in 2017 I opened my own studio teaching art to children and adults. Lockdown has been a tricky time (as I can’t teach) and my art journey has transitioned during this time allowing me to focus on my art practice full time.

Un-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeUn-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What do you wish to convey through your artworks?

As my work is very abstract you wouldn’t know at first glance that my paintings have a much deeper meaning behind them. My passion for a healthier planet and a kinder society plays an important role in my work. I ultimately want to spread a message advocating for positive change in our environment, how we treat it and how we each have a personal duty to preserve it. I want people to reflect on their own lives, their consumption and if they can, make small changes to make our world a cleaner, more compassionate and healthier planet to live on.

What made you decide to go vegan and how has it impacted your art?

In 2017 I joined Veganuary, an initiative started to encourage people to try being vegan for a month in January. I joined on a bit of a whim when my boyfriend suggested we should give it a go after he’d seen a poster on the tube. I was a meat eater at the time and had never really thought about going vegan but I am quite competitive and a bit stubborn so I thought, why not, I can do this! I can honestly say I really had no idea at the time how much it would not only impact my life but also my how much it would redefine my art. I love learning new little bits of information and I love reading so I took to all the information I could get my hands on to find out “why should I be vegan?” The more I read the more I found out about our environment, our [human] impact on our planet, the climate crisis, not to mention all the helpless animals. It got me thinking about my personal impact and how I can minimise my negative actions on our planet through staying vegan. Learning about our over consumption was why I started to make my own watercolour and stopped buying shop bought paint. It got me thinking about our journeys and movement during our lives. It completely focused my practice. It gave it purpose and now the story behind my work is not only meaningful but it’s growing and evolving each time I make a new piece of work. I believe this constant growth is because my inspiration is true, all encompassing and part of my lifestyle as a whole.

20200928L-MP_ALUKALA-146.jpg
View fullsize

What is your favourite piece that you created and why?

Ooh this is a tricky one. I think it might be a painting I made back in March last year called ‘The Third Wave’, just before the first lockdown. I made it for an exhibition I was co-curating called #Fakenews and it was [at the time] the biggest painting I had ever made. Not only this but it was the first time I had made my own copper acetate; made from copper scraps, vinegar and salt. It makes a kind of green/blue colour and I just loved it straight away. The final and biggest reason this painting is my favourite is because it was one of the first times I felt really inspired to create a piece, not only from my walks, but also from being inspired by something that really meant something to me. I was reading a book called ‘The New North: The World in 2050’, it is a book about climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion. When I was reading about ‘The Third Wave’, a chapter that ‘imagine[s] a 2050 world in which global population has grown by nearly half, forming crowded urban clots around the hot lower latitude of our planet’, it compelled me to make a piece about it. At the time of creating this piece I felt like it was a turning point in my work and was the catalyst for where my practice is now.

The Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed
View fullsizeThe Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed

What does your creative process look like?

On a day to day basis my creative process is pretty methodical. I like to be organised and tidy and I tend to work between painting, researching and like everyone else…admin. Because of the style of my work I can’t paint for hours and hours at a time, it’s too painful, so I work in shorter bursts interspersed with paint making and going out for walks to forage for new pigment. To make my watercolour it’s quite a lengthy process. It requires patience, accuracy for the most part and a little bit of playfulness too. In short these are the steps I take to make my own natural watercolours. I walk, forage, collect, crush, grind, sieve, levigate, mull, mix, store, dry, test, record and label each pigment. This process can take weeks or even months, all before I can even sit down to make a new piece of work. That’s generally why I try to go between making my paint, painting new work and foraging for pigment; it allows me to have new paint to hand when I need it. When I do sit down to paint I start with a walk that I have recorded on my phone using an app, I draw out the walk and decide on what parts of it I want to use. If I can, I use the pigment I found on that particular walk but sometimes this isn’t possible. I am completely obsessed with painting tiny dots. I can’t explain this really, I guess I am a bit of a perfectionist so maybe this has something to do with it, but I can’t be sure! More recently I have been working on creating much larger pieces which is a lot of fun but also a big shift from my comfort zone of small scale work. The amount of dots that need painting has increased quite considerably too!

Naturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeNaturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What/who are you inspired by?

Inspiration for me comes in the form of the walks I take and the pigment I find on my walks. These walks often translate into the shapes you see in my work and the pigment I collect is made into watercolour so I can paint with them. The colours I use in my work are completely dictated by where I am in the world. I spent a fair amount of time in Scotland and the earth there is so vastly different to the pigment I find here in London. It allows me to connect to the land that I walk on and share those journeys through my paintings.

Also, as you can tell from my other answers I am also very much inspired by my experiences in the world, reading about our complex eco system and the desire to help change the world for the better for generations to come.

Do you have any upcoming projects?

Due to lockdown pretty much all of my exhibitions I had planned for the latter half of last year have been postponed until later this year. I will be exhibiting in D Contemporary Gallery in Mayfair, The Cello Factory in Southbank and at D’O Studio and Gallery in The Netherlands.

I will be part of are Unity Art Project who are raising money through an art auction for The Trussell Trust. I have been selected as one of the artists chosen to collaborate with them, painting onto their print made for the auction. Twenty artists in total will each use the print as the base for their piece. I will also be taking part in a yearly open studio event in my area, North London, called Crouch End Open Studios. Normally this takes place in May but due to COVID it’ll be pushed back to September.

Finally, I am hoping to learn how to make my own paper. I feel like this is the next natural step to becoming a wholly sustainable artist, which is my ultimate goal!

How can we keep up to date with your work?

The best way to keep up to date is either through following me on Instagram @theworkshopn4, I love an Instagram post! Or by signing up to my newsletter through my website www.lisamarieprice.co.uk

Thanks for reading and if you’d like to ask any questions about my practice or processes you can always drop me an email at lisapriceart@me.com

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
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25/02/2021
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Lisa-Marie Price

Lisa-Marie Price is a London based artist that explores the connection between nature, people and place. She looks at how we interact with each other and develops work that portrays the intricacies between them. Her methodical style is created using watercolour sourced from pigment that she forages on her journeys. There is often a personalised element to her work focusing on geographical areas that are important to her and of those that commission her work.

We are giving away this unframed piece by Lisa-Marie to one of our lucky followers! To enter, click here and follow the instructions. The winner will be announced on the 18th of March. Good luck!

Cataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed
View fullsizeCataclysm, 20cm x 21.5cm, Unframed

What is your artistic background and how did you become an artist?

I guess I have always felt like an artist, or at least have always loved art and was one of the only things I felt I succeeded at and had a real passion for. I would say it was two years ago when I finally felt confident to tell people “I’m an artist” when they asked what “I did”. I studied Fine Art at university in London, mainly creating installation work, and as much as I loved art school I think most of my learning has come after. It has been 12 years since I left and over that time I have worked many art related jobs. Finally in 2017 I opened my own studio teaching art to children and adults. Lockdown has been a tricky time (as I can’t teach) and my art journey has transitioned during this time allowing me to focus on my art practice full time.

Un-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeUn-Walk The Line 37cm x 47cm £675 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What do you wish to convey through your artworks?

As my work is very abstract you wouldn’t know at first glance that my paintings have a much deeper meaning behind them. My passion for a healthier planet and a kinder society plays an important role in my work. I ultimately want to spread a message advocating for positive change in our environment, how we treat it and how we each have a personal duty to preserve it. I want people to reflect on their own lives, their consumption and if they can, make small changes to make our world a cleaner, more compassionate and healthier planet to live on.

What made you decide to go vegan and how has it impacted your art?

In 2017 I joined Veganuary, an initiative started to encourage people to try being vegan for a month in January. I joined on a bit of a whim when my boyfriend suggested we should give it a go after he’d seen a poster on the tube. I was a meat eater at the time and had never really thought about going vegan but I am quite competitive and a bit stubborn so I thought, why not, I can do this! I can honestly say I really had no idea at the time how much it would not only impact my life but also my how much it would redefine my art. I love learning new little bits of information and I love reading so I took to all the information I could get my hands on to find out “why should I be vegan?” The more I read the more I found out about our environment, our [human] impact on our planet, the climate crisis, not to mention all the helpless animals. It got me thinking about my personal impact and how I can minimise my negative actions on our planet through staying vegan. Learning about our over consumption was why I started to make my own watercolour and stopped buying shop bought paint. It got me thinking about our journeys and movement during our lives. It completely focused my practice. It gave it purpose and now the story behind my work is not only meaningful but it’s growing and evolving each time I make a new piece of work. I believe this constant growth is because my inspiration is true, all encompassing and part of my lifestyle as a whole.

20200928L-MP_ALUKALA-146.jpg
View fullsize

What is your favourite piece that you created and why?

Ooh this is a tricky one. I think it might be a painting I made back in March last year called ‘The Third Wave’, just before the first lockdown. I made it for an exhibition I was co-curating called #Fakenews and it was [at the time] the biggest painting I had ever made. Not only this but it was the first time I had made my own copper acetate; made from copper scraps, vinegar and salt. It makes a kind of green/blue colour and I just loved it straight away. The final and biggest reason this painting is my favourite is because it was one of the first times I felt really inspired to create a piece, not only from my walks, but also from being inspired by something that really meant something to me. I was reading a book called ‘The New North: The World in 2050’, it is a book about climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion. When I was reading about ‘The Third Wave’, a chapter that ‘imagine[s] a 2050 world in which global population has grown by nearly half, forming crowded urban clots around the hot lower latitude of our planet’, it compelled me to make a piece about it. At the time of creating this piece I felt like it was a turning point in my work and was the catalyst for where my practice is now.

The Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed
View fullsizeThe Third Wave 60cm x 60cm £795 Handmade watercolour on paper framed

What does your creative process look like?

On a day to day basis my creative process is pretty methodical. I like to be organised and tidy and I tend to work between painting, researching and like everyone else…admin. Because of the style of my work I can’t paint for hours and hours at a time, it’s too painful, so I work in shorter bursts interspersed with paint making and going out for walks to forage for new pigment. To make my watercolour it’s quite a lengthy process. It requires patience, accuracy for the most part and a little bit of playfulness too. In short these are the steps I take to make my own natural watercolours. I walk, forage, collect, crush, grind, sieve, levigate, mull, mix, store, dry, test, record and label each pigment. This process can take weeks or even months, all before I can even sit down to make a new piece of work. That’s generally why I try to go between making my paint, painting new work and foraging for pigment; it allows me to have new paint to hand when I need it. When I do sit down to paint I start with a walk that I have recorded on my phone using an app, I draw out the walk and decide on what parts of it I want to use. If I can, I use the pigment I found on that particular walk but sometimes this isn’t possible. I am completely obsessed with painting tiny dots. I can’t explain this really, I guess I am a bit of a perfectionist so maybe this has something to do with it, but I can’t be sure! More recently I have been working on creating much larger pieces which is a lot of fun but also a big shift from my comfort zone of small scale work. The amount of dots that need painting has increased quite considerably too!

Naturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)
View fullsizeNaturally Artificial 56cm x 76cm £1250 Handmade Watercolour on paper (unframed)

What/who are you inspired by?

Inspiration for me comes in the form of the walks I take and the pigment I find on my walks. These walks often translate into the shapes you see in my work and the pigment I collect is made into watercolour so I can paint with them. The colours I use in my work are completely dictated by where I am in the world. I spent a fair amount of time in Scotland and the earth there is so vastly different to the pigment I find here in London. It allows me to connect to the land that I walk on and share those journeys through my paintings.

Also, as you can tell from my other answers I am also very much inspired by my experiences in the world, reading about our complex eco system and the desire to help change the world for the better for generations to come.

Do you have any upcoming projects?

Due to lockdown pretty much all of my exhibitions I had planned for the latter half of last year have been postponed until later this year. I will be exhibiting in D Contemporary Gallery in Mayfair, The Cello Factory in Southbank and at D’O Studio and Gallery in The Netherlands.

I will be part of are Unity Art Project who are raising money through an art auction for The Trussell Trust. I have been selected as one of the artists chosen to collaborate with them, painting onto their print made for the auction. Twenty artists in total will each use the print as the base for their piece. I will also be taking part in a yearly open studio event in my area, North London, called Crouch End Open Studios. Normally this takes place in May but due to COVID it’ll be pushed back to September.

Finally, I am hoping to learn how to make my own paper. I feel like this is the next natural step to becoming a wholly sustainable artist, which is my ultimate goal!

How can we keep up to date with your work?

The best way to keep up to date is either through following me on Instagram @theworkshopn4, I love an Instagram post! Or by signing up to my newsletter through my website www.lisamarieprice.co.uk

Thanks for reading and if you’d like to ask any questions about my practice or processes you can always drop me an email at lisapriceart@me.com

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
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