10/09/2020
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Daan Oude Elferink

Daan Oude Elferink is a Dutch self-taught photographer who travels the world to explore and capture the beauty of forbidden, decayed and abandoned places. Read our interview to find out more about his work, discover the beauty of decay and learn about the risks and thrills that come with photographing abandoned places…

‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘After School’ – A school for boys in the UK.

When did your interest for decay and abandoned places start?

I was always drawn to adventure and even as a child you could often find me secretly playing in an abandoned factory, not knowing that I would be taking photos of them years later.

But the true passion started in 2008 when I stumbled on an abandoned fortress in Belgium. I climbed the fence and explored the building. There was security on the property, so it was very exciting moving from one building to the other. And there it was… a beautiful decaying staircase. I completely fell in love with it. Not only by the staircase itself, but mostly by the beauty of decay. Not long after, I was caught by the security and thrown off the property. The combination of excitement and beauty really got to me. At that time I knew I was going to look for more places like this. At first every week and in nearby countries. Now it is my job and I am exploring all over the world.

‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.

What is your process?

Usually when I explore an abandoned place, I have no idea what to expect. I don’t even know if I will be able to get inside, but when I do, it’s always a surprise. Sometimes it’s not interesting at all and I will be moving on to another place, but often it’s absolutely stunning. The most tricky locations (for example because it is in the middle of a city, or because there is security) I enter at night so no one can see me go in. Inside I wait until the sun comes up so I can start taking pictures.

I only work with natural light and mostly the places I explore are pretty dark, so besides my cameras and lenses, my flashlights and my tripod are my biggest friends. The rest of my gear depends on the location. Sometimes I need to bring a ladder, ropes, etc. A tool that you might not expect, but what is always in my bag, is a door handle. 10 years ago I was trapped inside a building because a door without a handle slammed shut. I never allow that to happen again ;-)

Inside the building I never start shooting right away (unless there is a big chance I will get caught). First I walk around and take it all in. In my first years I pretty much took pictures from every corner, but now I usually know right away what I am going to shoot and from which corner. That doesn’t mean I’ll be done quickly. Because I am a perfectionist, I can lay under a staircase for many hours to get the result perfectly as I imagine it.

 Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of th

Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of the floor that is still there is more or less floating midair.

 ‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.
‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.

Out of all the places you have photographed, which one struck you the most?

That’s a difficult question, because there a so many locations that stand out for different reasons. Some of them because they were so exciting, some of them because they were so beautiful and others because I was blown away by everything that was left behind.

If I have to pick one location, I choose a castle in Belgium. The castle was in terrible shape. Big holes in the floor and in the roof, but everything was left behind. In one room there was a beautiful piano (see my photo ‘Tunes of Decay’), in the other room the table with tableware was left behind. But what struck me the most were the Alfa Romeo sport cars (see my photo ‘Forgotten Alfas’) that were left behind in the basement. Also the exploration was very exciting, because the police showed up while I was inside. I was hiding in the closet, but I managed to escape. In my second book (I have three) ‘Gift of Time’, you can see more pictures of this incredible place and read the full story.

‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.

How do you go about finding the places? Do you look for specific things? What particularly strikes your interest?

Finding these places is the hardest part of my job. I have a small group of friends who search and share locations with each other. I use Google and Google Earth to do my research and when I find something that might be interesting, I mark it in Google Earth. When I have enough interesting marks in an area, it’s time to  plan the trip! It’s too dangerous to explore alone and obviously it’s much more fun with a buddy. Mostly I fly to the specific country, rent a car and the adventure can begin!

I am looking for every subject as long as it is abandoned and decaying. I have explored castles, villas, farm houses, hospitals, spa’s, sex clubs, metro tunnels, factories, stranded cars, trains, planes, ships, theme parks, hotels, theaters, etc. The locations that strikes my interest best are places where nature is taking over again.

‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.
‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.

How do you feel when you first enter an abandoned building? What goes through your mind when you take pictures?

Exploring an abandoned building for me is a rollercoaster of feelings. Finding a way in is mostly very exciting. Did anybody see or hear me? When I am inside and I think that I am safe, I feel a different kind of excitement when it’s an amazing location. I am blown away. I feel happy, grateful, amazed.

When that first excitement has settled, I get really calm and focused. That is when I start shooting.

What I love about these places is the beauty of decay. When a beautiful place is well preserved, I look at it, enjoy it for a moment and then forget about it. But when a place is abandoned and decayed it tells a story. It ignites the imagination. How did these people live? Why did they leave? What happened?

‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.
‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.

Which obstacles do you face when photographing an abandoned property?

I have been in many exciting situations and some of them have been very dangerous. I have been staring in the barrel of the gun of the police, have been chased down by dogs, met robbers and junkies. Floors have collapsed underneath my feet and I have been very sick because of the extreme mold inside some places.

‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.
‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.

Who/what is your biggest inspiration and why?

I am not inspired by one photographer or artist in particular, but I love browsing through photography websites. Every time I see a photo that I like, I ask myself why I find it so interesting. Is it the composition, the color, the depth, etc.? Every year in December (besides this year because of Corona) I exhibit my work in one of the biggest art shows in the world. Art Miami. Here I love to walk around for many days to get inspired by artists all over the world.

‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.

How can we keep up with your work? What is your next project?

The biggest project I was working on before Corona happened is Japan. But because of the virus I had to postpone that trip, the next trip will be Italy or Georgia.

Also I am working on my new (fourth) book which hopefully I will be able to publish it in 2021.

In a life before Corona my artworks are exhibited all over the world through art galleries and art fairs. An overview of my exhibitions are always listed on my website www.daanoe.com.

You can find my work on Facebook and Instagram. The best place to keep track of my work is to become a friend on my exclusive Facebook page. Here I also share stories, videos and new work I only share there.

Daan’s books ‘Touched by Time’, ‘Gift of Time’ and ‘Urban Exploration & Photography’ are available on our in app store and can be redeemed against Yamos points.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
10/09/2020
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Daan Oude Elferink

Daan Oude Elferink is a Dutch self-taught photographer who travels the world to explore and capture the beauty of forbidden, decayed and abandoned places. Read our interview to find out more about his work, discover the beauty of decay and learn about the risks and thrills that come with photographing abandoned places…

‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘After School’ – A school for boys in the UK.

When did your interest for decay and abandoned places start?

I was always drawn to adventure and even as a child you could often find me secretly playing in an abandoned factory, not knowing that I would be taking photos of them years later.

But the true passion started in 2008 when I stumbled on an abandoned fortress in Belgium. I climbed the fence and explored the building. There was security on the property, so it was very exciting moving from one building to the other. And there it was… a beautiful decaying staircase. I completely fell in love with it. Not only by the staircase itself, but mostly by the beauty of decay. Not long after, I was caught by the security and thrown off the property. The combination of excitement and beauty really got to me. At that time I knew I was going to look for more places like this. At first every week and in nearby countries. Now it is my job and I am exploring all over the world.

‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.

What is your process?

Usually when I explore an abandoned place, I have no idea what to expect. I don’t even know if I will be able to get inside, but when I do, it’s always a surprise. Sometimes it’s not interesting at all and I will be moving on to another place, but often it’s absolutely stunning. The most tricky locations (for example because it is in the middle of a city, or because there is security) I enter at night so no one can see me go in. Inside I wait until the sun comes up so I can start taking pictures.

I only work with natural light and mostly the places I explore are pretty dark, so besides my cameras and lenses, my flashlights and my tripod are my biggest friends. The rest of my gear depends on the location. Sometimes I need to bring a ladder, ropes, etc. A tool that you might not expect, but what is always in my bag, is a door handle. 10 years ago I was trapped inside a building because a door without a handle slammed shut. I never allow that to happen again ;-)

Inside the building I never start shooting right away (unless there is a big chance I will get caught). First I walk around and take it all in. In my first years I pretty much took pictures from every corner, but now I usually know right away what I am going to shoot and from which corner. That doesn’t mean I’ll be done quickly. Because I am a perfectionist, I can lay under a staircase for many hours to get the result perfectly as I imagine it.

 Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of th

Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of the floor that is still there is more or less floating midair.

 ‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.
‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.

Out of all the places you have photographed, which one struck you the most?

That’s a difficult question, because there a so many locations that stand out for different reasons. Some of them because they were so exciting, some of them because they were so beautiful and others because I was blown away by everything that was left behind.

If I have to pick one location, I choose a castle in Belgium. The castle was in terrible shape. Big holes in the floor and in the roof, but everything was left behind. In one room there was a beautiful piano (see my photo ‘Tunes of Decay’), in the other room the table with tableware was left behind. But what struck me the most were the Alfa Romeo sport cars (see my photo ‘Forgotten Alfas’) that were left behind in the basement. Also the exploration was very exciting, because the police showed up while I was inside. I was hiding in the closet, but I managed to escape. In my second book (I have three) ‘Gift of Time’, you can see more pictures of this incredible place and read the full story.

‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.

How do you go about finding the places? Do you look for specific things? What particularly strikes your interest?

Finding these places is the hardest part of my job. I have a small group of friends who search and share locations with each other. I use Google and Google Earth to do my research and when I find something that might be interesting, I mark it in Google Earth. When I have enough interesting marks in an area, it’s time to  plan the trip! It’s too dangerous to explore alone and obviously it’s much more fun with a buddy. Mostly I fly to the specific country, rent a car and the adventure can begin!

I am looking for every subject as long as it is abandoned and decaying. I have explored castles, villas, farm houses, hospitals, spa’s, sex clubs, metro tunnels, factories, stranded cars, trains, planes, ships, theme parks, hotels, theaters, etc. The locations that strikes my interest best are places where nature is taking over again.

‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.
‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.

How do you feel when you first enter an abandoned building? What goes through your mind when you take pictures?

Exploring an abandoned building for me is a rollercoaster of feelings. Finding a way in is mostly very exciting. Did anybody see or hear me? When I am inside and I think that I am safe, I feel a different kind of excitement when it’s an amazing location. I am blown away. I feel happy, grateful, amazed.

When that first excitement has settled, I get really calm and focused. That is when I start shooting.

What I love about these places is the beauty of decay. When a beautiful place is well preserved, I look at it, enjoy it for a moment and then forget about it. But when a place is abandoned and decayed it tells a story. It ignites the imagination. How did these people live? Why did they leave? What happened?

‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.
‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.

Which obstacles do you face when photographing an abandoned property?

I have been in many exciting situations and some of them have been very dangerous. I have been staring in the barrel of the gun of the police, have been chased down by dogs, met robbers and junkies. Floors have collapsed underneath my feet and I have been very sick because of the extreme mold inside some places.

‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.
‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.

Who/what is your biggest inspiration and why?

I am not inspired by one photographer or artist in particular, but I love browsing through photography websites. Every time I see a photo that I like, I ask myself why I find it so interesting. Is it the composition, the color, the depth, etc.? Every year in December (besides this year because of Corona) I exhibit my work in one of the biggest art shows in the world. Art Miami. Here I love to walk around for many days to get inspired by artists all over the world.

‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.

How can we keep up with your work? What is your next project?

The biggest project I was working on before Corona happened is Japan. But because of the virus I had to postpone that trip, the next trip will be Italy or Georgia.

Also I am working on my new (fourth) book which hopefully I will be able to publish it in 2021.

In a life before Corona my artworks are exhibited all over the world through art galleries and art fairs. An overview of my exhibitions are always listed on my website www.daanoe.com.

You can find my work on Facebook and Instagram. The best place to keep track of my work is to become a friend on my exclusive Facebook page. Here I also share stories, videos and new work I only share there.

Daan’s books ‘Touched by Time’, ‘Gift of Time’ and ‘Urban Exploration & Photography’ are available on our in app store and can be redeemed against Yamos points.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
10/09/2020
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Daan Oude Elferink

Daan Oude Elferink is a Dutch self-taught photographer who travels the world to explore and capture the beauty of forbidden, decayed and abandoned places. Read our interview to find out more about his work, discover the beauty of decay and learn about the risks and thrills that come with photographing abandoned places…

‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘After School’ – A school for boys in the UK.

When did your interest for decay and abandoned places start?

I was always drawn to adventure and even as a child you could often find me secretly playing in an abandoned factory, not knowing that I would be taking photos of them years later.

But the true passion started in 2008 when I stumbled on an abandoned fortress in Belgium. I climbed the fence and explored the building. There was security on the property, so it was very exciting moving from one building to the other. And there it was… a beautiful decaying staircase. I completely fell in love with it. Not only by the staircase itself, but mostly by the beauty of decay. Not long after, I was caught by the security and thrown off the property. The combination of excitement and beauty really got to me. At that time I knew I was going to look for more places like this. At first every week and in nearby countries. Now it is my job and I am exploring all over the world.

‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.

What is your process?

Usually when I explore an abandoned place, I have no idea what to expect. I don’t even know if I will be able to get inside, but when I do, it’s always a surprise. Sometimes it’s not interesting at all and I will be moving on to another place, but often it’s absolutely stunning. The most tricky locations (for example because it is in the middle of a city, or because there is security) I enter at night so no one can see me go in. Inside I wait until the sun comes up so I can start taking pictures.

I only work with natural light and mostly the places I explore are pretty dark, so besides my cameras and lenses, my flashlights and my tripod are my biggest friends. The rest of my gear depends on the location. Sometimes I need to bring a ladder, ropes, etc. A tool that you might not expect, but what is always in my bag, is a door handle. 10 years ago I was trapped inside a building because a door without a handle slammed shut. I never allow that to happen again ;-)

Inside the building I never start shooting right away (unless there is a big chance I will get caught). First I walk around and take it all in. In my first years I pretty much took pictures from every corner, but now I usually know right away what I am going to shoot and from which corner. That doesn’t mean I’ll be done quickly. Because I am a perfectionist, I can lay under a staircase for many hours to get the result perfectly as I imagine it.

 Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of th

Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of the floor that is still there is more or less floating midair.

 ‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.
‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.

Out of all the places you have photographed, which one struck you the most?

That’s a difficult question, because there a so many locations that stand out for different reasons. Some of them because they were so exciting, some of them because they were so beautiful and others because I was blown away by everything that was left behind.

If I have to pick one location, I choose a castle in Belgium. The castle was in terrible shape. Big holes in the floor and in the roof, but everything was left behind. In one room there was a beautiful piano (see my photo ‘Tunes of Decay’), in the other room the table with tableware was left behind. But what struck me the most were the Alfa Romeo sport cars (see my photo ‘Forgotten Alfas’) that were left behind in the basement. Also the exploration was very exciting, because the police showed up while I was inside. I was hiding in the closet, but I managed to escape. In my second book (I have three) ‘Gift of Time’, you can see more pictures of this incredible place and read the full story.

‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.

How do you go about finding the places? Do you look for specific things? What particularly strikes your interest?

Finding these places is the hardest part of my job. I have a small group of friends who search and share locations with each other. I use Google and Google Earth to do my research and when I find something that might be interesting, I mark it in Google Earth. When I have enough interesting marks in an area, it’s time to  plan the trip! It’s too dangerous to explore alone and obviously it’s much more fun with a buddy. Mostly I fly to the specific country, rent a car and the adventure can begin!

I am looking for every subject as long as it is abandoned and decaying. I have explored castles, villas, farm houses, hospitals, spa’s, sex clubs, metro tunnels, factories, stranded cars, trains, planes, ships, theme parks, hotels, theaters, etc. The locations that strikes my interest best are places where nature is taking over again.

‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.
‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.

How do you feel when you first enter an abandoned building? What goes through your mind when you take pictures?

Exploring an abandoned building for me is a rollercoaster of feelings. Finding a way in is mostly very exciting. Did anybody see or hear me? When I am inside and I think that I am safe, I feel a different kind of excitement when it’s an amazing location. I am blown away. I feel happy, grateful, amazed.

When that first excitement has settled, I get really calm and focused. That is when I start shooting.

What I love about these places is the beauty of decay. When a beautiful place is well preserved, I look at it, enjoy it for a moment and then forget about it. But when a place is abandoned and decayed it tells a story. It ignites the imagination. How did these people live? Why did they leave? What happened?

‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.
‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.

Which obstacles do you face when photographing an abandoned property?

I have been in many exciting situations and some of them have been very dangerous. I have been staring in the barrel of the gun of the police, have been chased down by dogs, met robbers and junkies. Floors have collapsed underneath my feet and I have been very sick because of the extreme mold inside some places.

‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.
‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.

Who/what is your biggest inspiration and why?

I am not inspired by one photographer or artist in particular, but I love browsing through photography websites. Every time I see a photo that I like, I ask myself why I find it so interesting. Is it the composition, the color, the depth, etc.? Every year in December (besides this year because of Corona) I exhibit my work in one of the biggest art shows in the world. Art Miami. Here I love to walk around for many days to get inspired by artists all over the world.

‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.

How can we keep up with your work? What is your next project?

The biggest project I was working on before Corona happened is Japan. But because of the virus I had to postpone that trip, the next trip will be Italy or Georgia.

Also I am working on my new (fourth) book which hopefully I will be able to publish it in 2021.

In a life before Corona my artworks are exhibited all over the world through art galleries and art fairs. An overview of my exhibitions are always listed on my website www.daanoe.com.

You can find my work on Facebook and Instagram. The best place to keep track of my work is to become a friend on my exclusive Facebook page. Here I also share stories, videos and new work I only share there.

Daan’s books ‘Touched by Time’, ‘Gift of Time’ and ‘Urban Exploration & Photography’ are available on our in app store and can be redeemed against Yamos points.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
10/09/2020
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Daan Oude Elferink

Daan Oude Elferink is a Dutch self-taught photographer who travels the world to explore and capture the beauty of forbidden, decayed and abandoned places. Read our interview to find out more about his work, discover the beauty of decay and learn about the risks and thrills that come with photographing abandoned places…

‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘After School’ – A school for boys in the UK.

When did your interest for decay and abandoned places start?

I was always drawn to adventure and even as a child you could often find me secretly playing in an abandoned factory, not knowing that I would be taking photos of them years later.

But the true passion started in 2008 when I stumbled on an abandoned fortress in Belgium. I climbed the fence and explored the building. There was security on the property, so it was very exciting moving from one building to the other. And there it was… a beautiful decaying staircase. I completely fell in love with it. Not only by the staircase itself, but mostly by the beauty of decay. Not long after, I was caught by the security and thrown off the property. The combination of excitement and beauty really got to me. At that time I knew I was going to look for more places like this. At first every week and in nearby countries. Now it is my job and I am exploring all over the world.

‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.

What is your process?

Usually when I explore an abandoned place, I have no idea what to expect. I don’t even know if I will be able to get inside, but when I do, it’s always a surprise. Sometimes it’s not interesting at all and I will be moving on to another place, but often it’s absolutely stunning. The most tricky locations (for example because it is in the middle of a city, or because there is security) I enter at night so no one can see me go in. Inside I wait until the sun comes up so I can start taking pictures.

I only work with natural light and mostly the places I explore are pretty dark, so besides my cameras and lenses, my flashlights and my tripod are my biggest friends. The rest of my gear depends on the location. Sometimes I need to bring a ladder, ropes, etc. A tool that you might not expect, but what is always in my bag, is a door handle. 10 years ago I was trapped inside a building because a door without a handle slammed shut. I never allow that to happen again ;-)

Inside the building I never start shooting right away (unless there is a big chance I will get caught). First I walk around and take it all in. In my first years I pretty much took pictures from every corner, but now I usually know right away what I am going to shoot and from which corner. That doesn’t mean I’ll be done quickly. Because I am a perfectionist, I can lay under a staircase for many hours to get the result perfectly as I imagine it.

 Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of th

Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of the floor that is still there is more or less floating midair.

 ‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.
‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.

Out of all the places you have photographed, which one struck you the most?

That’s a difficult question, because there a so many locations that stand out for different reasons. Some of them because they were so exciting, some of them because they were so beautiful and others because I was blown away by everything that was left behind.

If I have to pick one location, I choose a castle in Belgium. The castle was in terrible shape. Big holes in the floor and in the roof, but everything was left behind. In one room there was a beautiful piano (see my photo ‘Tunes of Decay’), in the other room the table with tableware was left behind. But what struck me the most were the Alfa Romeo sport cars (see my photo ‘Forgotten Alfas’) that were left behind in the basement. Also the exploration was very exciting, because the police showed up while I was inside. I was hiding in the closet, but I managed to escape. In my second book (I have three) ‘Gift of Time’, you can see more pictures of this incredible place and read the full story.

‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.

How do you go about finding the places? Do you look for specific things? What particularly strikes your interest?

Finding these places is the hardest part of my job. I have a small group of friends who search and share locations with each other. I use Google and Google Earth to do my research and when I find something that might be interesting, I mark it in Google Earth. When I have enough interesting marks in an area, it’s time to  plan the trip! It’s too dangerous to explore alone and obviously it’s much more fun with a buddy. Mostly I fly to the specific country, rent a car and the adventure can begin!

I am looking for every subject as long as it is abandoned and decaying. I have explored castles, villas, farm houses, hospitals, spa’s, sex clubs, metro tunnels, factories, stranded cars, trains, planes, ships, theme parks, hotels, theaters, etc. The locations that strikes my interest best are places where nature is taking over again.

‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.
‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.

How do you feel when you first enter an abandoned building? What goes through your mind when you take pictures?

Exploring an abandoned building for me is a rollercoaster of feelings. Finding a way in is mostly very exciting. Did anybody see or hear me? When I am inside and I think that I am safe, I feel a different kind of excitement when it’s an amazing location. I am blown away. I feel happy, grateful, amazed.

When that first excitement has settled, I get really calm and focused. That is when I start shooting.

What I love about these places is the beauty of decay. When a beautiful place is well preserved, I look at it, enjoy it for a moment and then forget about it. But when a place is abandoned and decayed it tells a story. It ignites the imagination. How did these people live? Why did they leave? What happened?

‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.
‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.

Which obstacles do you face when photographing an abandoned property?

I have been in many exciting situations and some of them have been very dangerous. I have been staring in the barrel of the gun of the police, have been chased down by dogs, met robbers and junkies. Floors have collapsed underneath my feet and I have been very sick because of the extreme mold inside some places.

‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.
‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.

Who/what is your biggest inspiration and why?

I am not inspired by one photographer or artist in particular, but I love browsing through photography websites. Every time I see a photo that I like, I ask myself why I find it so interesting. Is it the composition, the color, the depth, etc.? Every year in December (besides this year because of Corona) I exhibit my work in one of the biggest art shows in the world. Art Miami. Here I love to walk around for many days to get inspired by artists all over the world.

‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.

How can we keep up with your work? What is your next project?

The biggest project I was working on before Corona happened is Japan. But because of the virus I had to postpone that trip, the next trip will be Italy or Georgia.

Also I am working on my new (fourth) book which hopefully I will be able to publish it in 2021.

In a life before Corona my artworks are exhibited all over the world through art galleries and art fairs. An overview of my exhibitions are always listed on my website www.daanoe.com.

You can find my work on Facebook and Instagram. The best place to keep track of my work is to become a friend on my exclusive Facebook page. Here I also share stories, videos and new work I only share there.

Daan’s books ‘Touched by Time’, ‘Gift of Time’ and ‘Urban Exploration & Photography’ are available on our in app store and can be redeemed against Yamos points.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
10/09/2020
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Daan Oude Elferink

Daan Oude Elferink is a Dutch self-taught photographer who travels the world to explore and capture the beauty of forbidden, decayed and abandoned places. Read our interview to find out more about his work, discover the beauty of decay and learn about the risks and thrills that come with photographing abandoned places…

‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘After School’ – A school for boys in the UK.

When did your interest for decay and abandoned places start?

I was always drawn to adventure and even as a child you could often find me secretly playing in an abandoned factory, not knowing that I would be taking photos of them years later.

But the true passion started in 2008 when I stumbled on an abandoned fortress in Belgium. I climbed the fence and explored the building. There was security on the property, so it was very exciting moving from one building to the other. And there it was… a beautiful decaying staircase. I completely fell in love with it. Not only by the staircase itself, but mostly by the beauty of decay. Not long after, I was caught by the security and thrown off the property. The combination of excitement and beauty really got to me. At that time I knew I was going to look for more places like this. At first every week and in nearby countries. Now it is my job and I am exploring all over the world.

‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.

What is your process?

Usually when I explore an abandoned place, I have no idea what to expect. I don’t even know if I will be able to get inside, but when I do, it’s always a surprise. Sometimes it’s not interesting at all and I will be moving on to another place, but often it’s absolutely stunning. The most tricky locations (for example because it is in the middle of a city, or because there is security) I enter at night so no one can see me go in. Inside I wait until the sun comes up so I can start taking pictures.

I only work with natural light and mostly the places I explore are pretty dark, so besides my cameras and lenses, my flashlights and my tripod are my biggest friends. The rest of my gear depends on the location. Sometimes I need to bring a ladder, ropes, etc. A tool that you might not expect, but what is always in my bag, is a door handle. 10 years ago I was trapped inside a building because a door without a handle slammed shut. I never allow that to happen again ;-)

Inside the building I never start shooting right away (unless there is a big chance I will get caught). First I walk around and take it all in. In my first years I pretty much took pictures from every corner, but now I usually know right away what I am going to shoot and from which corner. That doesn’t mean I’ll be done quickly. Because I am a perfectionist, I can lay under a staircase for many hours to get the result perfectly as I imagine it.

 Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of th

Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of the floor that is still there is more or less floating midair.

 ‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.
‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.

Out of all the places you have photographed, which one struck you the most?

That’s a difficult question, because there a so many locations that stand out for different reasons. Some of them because they were so exciting, some of them because they were so beautiful and others because I was blown away by everything that was left behind.

If I have to pick one location, I choose a castle in Belgium. The castle was in terrible shape. Big holes in the floor and in the roof, but everything was left behind. In one room there was a beautiful piano (see my photo ‘Tunes of Decay’), in the other room the table with tableware was left behind. But what struck me the most were the Alfa Romeo sport cars (see my photo ‘Forgotten Alfas’) that were left behind in the basement. Also the exploration was very exciting, because the police showed up while I was inside. I was hiding in the closet, but I managed to escape. In my second book (I have three) ‘Gift of Time’, you can see more pictures of this incredible place and read the full story.

‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.

How do you go about finding the places? Do you look for specific things? What particularly strikes your interest?

Finding these places is the hardest part of my job. I have a small group of friends who search and share locations with each other. I use Google and Google Earth to do my research and when I find something that might be interesting, I mark it in Google Earth. When I have enough interesting marks in an area, it’s time to  plan the trip! It’s too dangerous to explore alone and obviously it’s much more fun with a buddy. Mostly I fly to the specific country, rent a car and the adventure can begin!

I am looking for every subject as long as it is abandoned and decaying. I have explored castles, villas, farm houses, hospitals, spa’s, sex clubs, metro tunnels, factories, stranded cars, trains, planes, ships, theme parks, hotels, theaters, etc. The locations that strikes my interest best are places where nature is taking over again.

‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.
‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.

How do you feel when you first enter an abandoned building? What goes through your mind when you take pictures?

Exploring an abandoned building for me is a rollercoaster of feelings. Finding a way in is mostly very exciting. Did anybody see or hear me? When I am inside and I think that I am safe, I feel a different kind of excitement when it’s an amazing location. I am blown away. I feel happy, grateful, amazed.

When that first excitement has settled, I get really calm and focused. That is when I start shooting.

What I love about these places is the beauty of decay. When a beautiful place is well preserved, I look at it, enjoy it for a moment and then forget about it. But when a place is abandoned and decayed it tells a story. It ignites the imagination. How did these people live? Why did they leave? What happened?

‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.
‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.

Which obstacles do you face when photographing an abandoned property?

I have been in many exciting situations and some of them have been very dangerous. I have been staring in the barrel of the gun of the police, have been chased down by dogs, met robbers and junkies. Floors have collapsed underneath my feet and I have been very sick because of the extreme mold inside some places.

‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.
‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.

Who/what is your biggest inspiration and why?

I am not inspired by one photographer or artist in particular, but I love browsing through photography websites. Every time I see a photo that I like, I ask myself why I find it so interesting. Is it the composition, the color, the depth, etc.? Every year in December (besides this year because of Corona) I exhibit my work in one of the biggest art shows in the world. Art Miami. Here I love to walk around for many days to get inspired by artists all over the world.

‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.

How can we keep up with your work? What is your next project?

The biggest project I was working on before Corona happened is Japan. But because of the virus I had to postpone that trip, the next trip will be Italy or Georgia.

Also I am working on my new (fourth) book which hopefully I will be able to publish it in 2021.

In a life before Corona my artworks are exhibited all over the world through art galleries and art fairs. An overview of my exhibitions are always listed on my website www.daanoe.com.

You can find my work on Facebook and Instagram. The best place to keep track of my work is to become a friend on my exclusive Facebook page. Here I also share stories, videos and new work I only share there.

Daan’s books ‘Touched by Time’, ‘Gift of Time’ and ‘Urban Exploration & Photography’ are available on our in app store and can be redeemed against Yamos points.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
10/09/2020
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Daan Oude Elferink

Daan Oude Elferink is a Dutch self-taught photographer who travels the world to explore and capture the beauty of forbidden, decayed and abandoned places. Read our interview to find out more about his work, discover the beauty of decay and learn about the risks and thrills that come with photographing abandoned places…

‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘After School’ – A school for boys in the UK.

When did your interest for decay and abandoned places start?

I was always drawn to adventure and even as a child you could often find me secretly playing in an abandoned factory, not knowing that I would be taking photos of them years later.

But the true passion started in 2008 when I stumbled on an abandoned fortress in Belgium. I climbed the fence and explored the building. There was security on the property, so it was very exciting moving from one building to the other. And there it was… a beautiful decaying staircase. I completely fell in love with it. Not only by the staircase itself, but mostly by the beauty of decay. Not long after, I was caught by the security and thrown off the property. The combination of excitement and beauty really got to me. At that time I knew I was going to look for more places like this. At first every week and in nearby countries. Now it is my job and I am exploring all over the world.

‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.

What is your process?

Usually when I explore an abandoned place, I have no idea what to expect. I don’t even know if I will be able to get inside, but when I do, it’s always a surprise. Sometimes it’s not interesting at all and I will be moving on to another place, but often it’s absolutely stunning. The most tricky locations (for example because it is in the middle of a city, or because there is security) I enter at night so no one can see me go in. Inside I wait until the sun comes up so I can start taking pictures.

I only work with natural light and mostly the places I explore are pretty dark, so besides my cameras and lenses, my flashlights and my tripod are my biggest friends. The rest of my gear depends on the location. Sometimes I need to bring a ladder, ropes, etc. A tool that you might not expect, but what is always in my bag, is a door handle. 10 years ago I was trapped inside a building because a door without a handle slammed shut. I never allow that to happen again ;-)

Inside the building I never start shooting right away (unless there is a big chance I will get caught). First I walk around and take it all in. In my first years I pretty much took pictures from every corner, but now I usually know right away what I am going to shoot and from which corner. That doesn’t mean I’ll be done quickly. Because I am a perfectionist, I can lay under a staircase for many hours to get the result perfectly as I imagine it.

 Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of th

Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of the floor that is still there is more or less floating midair.

 ‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.
‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.

Out of all the places you have photographed, which one struck you the most?

That’s a difficult question, because there a so many locations that stand out for different reasons. Some of them because they were so exciting, some of them because they were so beautiful and others because I was blown away by everything that was left behind.

If I have to pick one location, I choose a castle in Belgium. The castle was in terrible shape. Big holes in the floor and in the roof, but everything was left behind. In one room there was a beautiful piano (see my photo ‘Tunes of Decay’), in the other room the table with tableware was left behind. But what struck me the most were the Alfa Romeo sport cars (see my photo ‘Forgotten Alfas’) that were left behind in the basement. Also the exploration was very exciting, because the police showed up while I was inside. I was hiding in the closet, but I managed to escape. In my second book (I have three) ‘Gift of Time’, you can see more pictures of this incredible place and read the full story.

‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.

How do you go about finding the places? Do you look for specific things? What particularly strikes your interest?

Finding these places is the hardest part of my job. I have a small group of friends who search and share locations with each other. I use Google and Google Earth to do my research and when I find something that might be interesting, I mark it in Google Earth. When I have enough interesting marks in an area, it’s time to  plan the trip! It’s too dangerous to explore alone and obviously it’s much more fun with a buddy. Mostly I fly to the specific country, rent a car and the adventure can begin!

I am looking for every subject as long as it is abandoned and decaying. I have explored castles, villas, farm houses, hospitals, spa’s, sex clubs, metro tunnels, factories, stranded cars, trains, planes, ships, theme parks, hotels, theaters, etc. The locations that strikes my interest best are places where nature is taking over again.

‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.
‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.

How do you feel when you first enter an abandoned building? What goes through your mind when you take pictures?

Exploring an abandoned building for me is a rollercoaster of feelings. Finding a way in is mostly very exciting. Did anybody see or hear me? When I am inside and I think that I am safe, I feel a different kind of excitement when it’s an amazing location. I am blown away. I feel happy, grateful, amazed.

When that first excitement has settled, I get really calm and focused. That is when I start shooting.

What I love about these places is the beauty of decay. When a beautiful place is well preserved, I look at it, enjoy it for a moment and then forget about it. But when a place is abandoned and decayed it tells a story. It ignites the imagination. How did these people live? Why did they leave? What happened?

‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.
‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.

Which obstacles do you face when photographing an abandoned property?

I have been in many exciting situations and some of them have been very dangerous. I have been staring in the barrel of the gun of the police, have been chased down by dogs, met robbers and junkies. Floors have collapsed underneath my feet and I have been very sick because of the extreme mold inside some places.

‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.
‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.

Who/what is your biggest inspiration and why?

I am not inspired by one photographer or artist in particular, but I love browsing through photography websites. Every time I see a photo that I like, I ask myself why I find it so interesting. Is it the composition, the color, the depth, etc.? Every year in December (besides this year because of Corona) I exhibit my work in one of the biggest art shows in the world. Art Miami. Here I love to walk around for many days to get inspired by artists all over the world.

‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.

How can we keep up with your work? What is your next project?

The biggest project I was working on before Corona happened is Japan. But because of the virus I had to postpone that trip, the next trip will be Italy or Georgia.

Also I am working on my new (fourth) book which hopefully I will be able to publish it in 2021.

In a life before Corona my artworks are exhibited all over the world through art galleries and art fairs. An overview of my exhibitions are always listed on my website www.daanoe.com.

You can find my work on Facebook and Instagram. The best place to keep track of my work is to become a friend on my exclusive Facebook page. Here I also share stories, videos and new work I only share there.

Daan’s books ‘Touched by Time’, ‘Gift of Time’ and ‘Urban Exploration & Photography’ are available on our in app store and can be redeemed against Yamos points.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
10/09/2020
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Daan Oude Elferink

Daan Oude Elferink is a Dutch self-taught photographer who travels the world to explore and capture the beauty of forbidden, decayed and abandoned places. Read our interview to find out more about his work, discover the beauty of decay and learn about the risks and thrills that come with photographing abandoned places…

‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘After School’ – A school for boys in the UK.

When did your interest for decay and abandoned places start?

I was always drawn to adventure and even as a child you could often find me secretly playing in an abandoned factory, not knowing that I would be taking photos of them years later.

But the true passion started in 2008 when I stumbled on an abandoned fortress in Belgium. I climbed the fence and explored the building. There was security on the property, so it was very exciting moving from one building to the other. And there it was… a beautiful decaying staircase. I completely fell in love with it. Not only by the staircase itself, but mostly by the beauty of decay. Not long after, I was caught by the security and thrown off the property. The combination of excitement and beauty really got to me. At that time I knew I was going to look for more places like this. At first every week and in nearby countries. Now it is my job and I am exploring all over the world.

‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.

What is your process?

Usually when I explore an abandoned place, I have no idea what to expect. I don’t even know if I will be able to get inside, but when I do, it’s always a surprise. Sometimes it’s not interesting at all and I will be moving on to another place, but often it’s absolutely stunning. The most tricky locations (for example because it is in the middle of a city, or because there is security) I enter at night so no one can see me go in. Inside I wait until the sun comes up so I can start taking pictures.

I only work with natural light and mostly the places I explore are pretty dark, so besides my cameras and lenses, my flashlights and my tripod are my biggest friends. The rest of my gear depends on the location. Sometimes I need to bring a ladder, ropes, etc. A tool that you might not expect, but what is always in my bag, is a door handle. 10 years ago I was trapped inside a building because a door without a handle slammed shut. I never allow that to happen again ;-)

Inside the building I never start shooting right away (unless there is a big chance I will get caught). First I walk around and take it all in. In my first years I pretty much took pictures from every corner, but now I usually know right away what I am going to shoot and from which corner. That doesn’t mean I’ll be done quickly. Because I am a perfectionist, I can lay under a staircase for many hours to get the result perfectly as I imagine it.

 Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of th

Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of the floor that is still there is more or less floating midair.

 ‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.
‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.

Out of all the places you have photographed, which one struck you the most?

That’s a difficult question, because there a so many locations that stand out for different reasons. Some of them because they were so exciting, some of them because they were so beautiful and others because I was blown away by everything that was left behind.

If I have to pick one location, I choose a castle in Belgium. The castle was in terrible shape. Big holes in the floor and in the roof, but everything was left behind. In one room there was a beautiful piano (see my photo ‘Tunes of Decay’), in the other room the table with tableware was left behind. But what struck me the most were the Alfa Romeo sport cars (see my photo ‘Forgotten Alfas’) that were left behind in the basement. Also the exploration was very exciting, because the police showed up while I was inside. I was hiding in the closet, but I managed to escape. In my second book (I have three) ‘Gift of Time’, you can see more pictures of this incredible place and read the full story.

‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.

How do you go about finding the places? Do you look for specific things? What particularly strikes your interest?

Finding these places is the hardest part of my job. I have a small group of friends who search and share locations with each other. I use Google and Google Earth to do my research and when I find something that might be interesting, I mark it in Google Earth. When I have enough interesting marks in an area, it’s time to  plan the trip! It’s too dangerous to explore alone and obviously it’s much more fun with a buddy. Mostly I fly to the specific country, rent a car and the adventure can begin!

I am looking for every subject as long as it is abandoned and decaying. I have explored castles, villas, farm houses, hospitals, spa’s, sex clubs, metro tunnels, factories, stranded cars, trains, planes, ships, theme parks, hotels, theaters, etc. The locations that strikes my interest best are places where nature is taking over again.

‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.
‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.

How do you feel when you first enter an abandoned building? What goes through your mind when you take pictures?

Exploring an abandoned building for me is a rollercoaster of feelings. Finding a way in is mostly very exciting. Did anybody see or hear me? When I am inside and I think that I am safe, I feel a different kind of excitement when it’s an amazing location. I am blown away. I feel happy, grateful, amazed.

When that first excitement has settled, I get really calm and focused. That is when I start shooting.

What I love about these places is the beauty of decay. When a beautiful place is well preserved, I look at it, enjoy it for a moment and then forget about it. But when a place is abandoned and decayed it tells a story. It ignites the imagination. How did these people live? Why did they leave? What happened?

‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.
‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.

Which obstacles do you face when photographing an abandoned property?

I have been in many exciting situations and some of them have been very dangerous. I have been staring in the barrel of the gun of the police, have been chased down by dogs, met robbers and junkies. Floors have collapsed underneath my feet and I have been very sick because of the extreme mold inside some places.

‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.
‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.

Who/what is your biggest inspiration and why?

I am not inspired by one photographer or artist in particular, but I love browsing through photography websites. Every time I see a photo that I like, I ask myself why I find it so interesting. Is it the composition, the color, the depth, etc.? Every year in December (besides this year because of Corona) I exhibit my work in one of the biggest art shows in the world. Art Miami. Here I love to walk around for many days to get inspired by artists all over the world.

‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.

How can we keep up with your work? What is your next project?

The biggest project I was working on before Corona happened is Japan. But because of the virus I had to postpone that trip, the next trip will be Italy or Georgia.

Also I am working on my new (fourth) book which hopefully I will be able to publish it in 2021.

In a life before Corona my artworks are exhibited all over the world through art galleries and art fairs. An overview of my exhibitions are always listed on my website www.daanoe.com.

You can find my work on Facebook and Instagram. The best place to keep track of my work is to become a friend on my exclusive Facebook page. Here I also share stories, videos and new work I only share there.

Daan’s books ‘Touched by Time’, ‘Gift of Time’ and ‘Urban Exploration & Photography’ are available on our in app store and can be redeemed against Yamos points.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
10/09/2020
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Daan Oude Elferink

Daan Oude Elferink is a Dutch self-taught photographer who travels the world to explore and capture the beauty of forbidden, decayed and abandoned places. Read our interview to find out more about his work, discover the beauty of decay and learn about the risks and thrills that come with photographing abandoned places…

‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘After School’ – A school for boys in the UK.

When did your interest for decay and abandoned places start?

I was always drawn to adventure and even as a child you could often find me secretly playing in an abandoned factory, not knowing that I would be taking photos of them years later.

But the true passion started in 2008 when I stumbled on an abandoned fortress in Belgium. I climbed the fence and explored the building. There was security on the property, so it was very exciting moving from one building to the other. And there it was… a beautiful decaying staircase. I completely fell in love with it. Not only by the staircase itself, but mostly by the beauty of decay. Not long after, I was caught by the security and thrown off the property. The combination of excitement and beauty really got to me. At that time I knew I was going to look for more places like this. At first every week and in nearby countries. Now it is my job and I am exploring all over the world.

‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.

What is your process?

Usually when I explore an abandoned place, I have no idea what to expect. I don’t even know if I will be able to get inside, but when I do, it’s always a surprise. Sometimes it’s not interesting at all and I will be moving on to another place, but often it’s absolutely stunning. The most tricky locations (for example because it is in the middle of a city, or because there is security) I enter at night so no one can see me go in. Inside I wait until the sun comes up so I can start taking pictures.

I only work with natural light and mostly the places I explore are pretty dark, so besides my cameras and lenses, my flashlights and my tripod are my biggest friends. The rest of my gear depends on the location. Sometimes I need to bring a ladder, ropes, etc. A tool that you might not expect, but what is always in my bag, is a door handle. 10 years ago I was trapped inside a building because a door without a handle slammed shut. I never allow that to happen again ;-)

Inside the building I never start shooting right away (unless there is a big chance I will get caught). First I walk around and take it all in. In my first years I pretty much took pictures from every corner, but now I usually know right away what I am going to shoot and from which corner. That doesn’t mean I’ll be done quickly. Because I am a perfectionist, I can lay under a staircase for many hours to get the result perfectly as I imagine it.

 Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of th

Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of the floor that is still there is more or less floating midair.

 ‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.
‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.

Out of all the places you have photographed, which one struck you the most?

That’s a difficult question, because there a so many locations that stand out for different reasons. Some of them because they were so exciting, some of them because they were so beautiful and others because I was blown away by everything that was left behind.

If I have to pick one location, I choose a castle in Belgium. The castle was in terrible shape. Big holes in the floor and in the roof, but everything was left behind. In one room there was a beautiful piano (see my photo ‘Tunes of Decay’), in the other room the table with tableware was left behind. But what struck me the most were the Alfa Romeo sport cars (see my photo ‘Forgotten Alfas’) that were left behind in the basement. Also the exploration was very exciting, because the police showed up while I was inside. I was hiding in the closet, but I managed to escape. In my second book (I have three) ‘Gift of Time’, you can see more pictures of this incredible place and read the full story.

‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.

How do you go about finding the places? Do you look for specific things? What particularly strikes your interest?

Finding these places is the hardest part of my job. I have a small group of friends who search and share locations with each other. I use Google and Google Earth to do my research and when I find something that might be interesting, I mark it in Google Earth. When I have enough interesting marks in an area, it’s time to  plan the trip! It’s too dangerous to explore alone and obviously it’s much more fun with a buddy. Mostly I fly to the specific country, rent a car and the adventure can begin!

I am looking for every subject as long as it is abandoned and decaying. I have explored castles, villas, farm houses, hospitals, spa’s, sex clubs, metro tunnels, factories, stranded cars, trains, planes, ships, theme parks, hotels, theaters, etc. The locations that strikes my interest best are places where nature is taking over again.

‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.
‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.

How do you feel when you first enter an abandoned building? What goes through your mind when you take pictures?

Exploring an abandoned building for me is a rollercoaster of feelings. Finding a way in is mostly very exciting. Did anybody see or hear me? When I am inside and I think that I am safe, I feel a different kind of excitement when it’s an amazing location. I am blown away. I feel happy, grateful, amazed.

When that first excitement has settled, I get really calm and focused. That is when I start shooting.

What I love about these places is the beauty of decay. When a beautiful place is well preserved, I look at it, enjoy it for a moment and then forget about it. But when a place is abandoned and decayed it tells a story. It ignites the imagination. How did these people live? Why did they leave? What happened?

‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.
‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.

Which obstacles do you face when photographing an abandoned property?

I have been in many exciting situations and some of them have been very dangerous. I have been staring in the barrel of the gun of the police, have been chased down by dogs, met robbers and junkies. Floors have collapsed underneath my feet and I have been very sick because of the extreme mold inside some places.

‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.
‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.

Who/what is your biggest inspiration and why?

I am not inspired by one photographer or artist in particular, but I love browsing through photography websites. Every time I see a photo that I like, I ask myself why I find it so interesting. Is it the composition, the color, the depth, etc.? Every year in December (besides this year because of Corona) I exhibit my work in one of the biggest art shows in the world. Art Miami. Here I love to walk around for many days to get inspired by artists all over the world.

‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.

How can we keep up with your work? What is your next project?

The biggest project I was working on before Corona happened is Japan. But because of the virus I had to postpone that trip, the next trip will be Italy or Georgia.

Also I am working on my new (fourth) book which hopefully I will be able to publish it in 2021.

In a life before Corona my artworks are exhibited all over the world through art galleries and art fairs. An overview of my exhibitions are always listed on my website www.daanoe.com.

You can find my work on Facebook and Instagram. The best place to keep track of my work is to become a friend on my exclusive Facebook page. Here I also share stories, videos and new work I only share there.

Daan’s books ‘Touched by Time’, ‘Gift of Time’ and ‘Urban Exploration & Photography’ are available on our in app store and can be redeemed against Yamos points.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
10/09/2020
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Daan Oude Elferink

Daan Oude Elferink is a Dutch self-taught photographer who travels the world to explore and capture the beauty of forbidden, decayed and abandoned places. Read our interview to find out more about his work, discover the beauty of decay and learn about the risks and thrills that come with photographing abandoned places…

‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘After School’ – A school for boys in the UK.

When did your interest for decay and abandoned places start?

I was always drawn to adventure and even as a child you could often find me secretly playing in an abandoned factory, not knowing that I would be taking photos of them years later.

But the true passion started in 2008 when I stumbled on an abandoned fortress in Belgium. I climbed the fence and explored the building. There was security on the property, so it was very exciting moving from one building to the other. And there it was… a beautiful decaying staircase. I completely fell in love with it. Not only by the staircase itself, but mostly by the beauty of decay. Not long after, I was caught by the security and thrown off the property. The combination of excitement and beauty really got to me. At that time I knew I was going to look for more places like this. At first every week and in nearby countries. Now it is my job and I am exploring all over the world.

‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.

What is your process?

Usually when I explore an abandoned place, I have no idea what to expect. I don’t even know if I will be able to get inside, but when I do, it’s always a surprise. Sometimes it’s not interesting at all and I will be moving on to another place, but often it’s absolutely stunning. The most tricky locations (for example because it is in the middle of a city, or because there is security) I enter at night so no one can see me go in. Inside I wait until the sun comes up so I can start taking pictures.

I only work with natural light and mostly the places I explore are pretty dark, so besides my cameras and lenses, my flashlights and my tripod are my biggest friends. The rest of my gear depends on the location. Sometimes I need to bring a ladder, ropes, etc. A tool that you might not expect, but what is always in my bag, is a door handle. 10 years ago I was trapped inside a building because a door without a handle slammed shut. I never allow that to happen again ;-)

Inside the building I never start shooting right away (unless there is a big chance I will get caught). First I walk around and take it all in. In my first years I pretty much took pictures from every corner, but now I usually know right away what I am going to shoot and from which corner. That doesn’t mean I’ll be done quickly. Because I am a perfectionist, I can lay under a staircase for many hours to get the result perfectly as I imagine it.

 Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of th

Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of the floor that is still there is more or less floating midair.

 ‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.
‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.

Out of all the places you have photographed, which one struck you the most?

That’s a difficult question, because there a so many locations that stand out for different reasons. Some of them because they were so exciting, some of them because they were so beautiful and others because I was blown away by everything that was left behind.

If I have to pick one location, I choose a castle in Belgium. The castle was in terrible shape. Big holes in the floor and in the roof, but everything was left behind. In one room there was a beautiful piano (see my photo ‘Tunes of Decay’), in the other room the table with tableware was left behind. But what struck me the most were the Alfa Romeo sport cars (see my photo ‘Forgotten Alfas’) that were left behind in the basement. Also the exploration was very exciting, because the police showed up while I was inside. I was hiding in the closet, but I managed to escape. In my second book (I have three) ‘Gift of Time’, you can see more pictures of this incredible place and read the full story.

‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.

How do you go about finding the places? Do you look for specific things? What particularly strikes your interest?

Finding these places is the hardest part of my job. I have a small group of friends who search and share locations with each other. I use Google and Google Earth to do my research and when I find something that might be interesting, I mark it in Google Earth. When I have enough interesting marks in an area, it’s time to  plan the trip! It’s too dangerous to explore alone and obviously it’s much more fun with a buddy. Mostly I fly to the specific country, rent a car and the adventure can begin!

I am looking for every subject as long as it is abandoned and decaying. I have explored castles, villas, farm houses, hospitals, spa’s, sex clubs, metro tunnels, factories, stranded cars, trains, planes, ships, theme parks, hotels, theaters, etc. The locations that strikes my interest best are places where nature is taking over again.

‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.
‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.

How do you feel when you first enter an abandoned building? What goes through your mind when you take pictures?

Exploring an abandoned building for me is a rollercoaster of feelings. Finding a way in is mostly very exciting. Did anybody see or hear me? When I am inside and I think that I am safe, I feel a different kind of excitement when it’s an amazing location. I am blown away. I feel happy, grateful, amazed.

When that first excitement has settled, I get really calm and focused. That is when I start shooting.

What I love about these places is the beauty of decay. When a beautiful place is well preserved, I look at it, enjoy it for a moment and then forget about it. But when a place is abandoned and decayed it tells a story. It ignites the imagination. How did these people live? Why did they leave? What happened?

‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.
‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.

Which obstacles do you face when photographing an abandoned property?

I have been in many exciting situations and some of them have been very dangerous. I have been staring in the barrel of the gun of the police, have been chased down by dogs, met robbers and junkies. Floors have collapsed underneath my feet and I have been very sick because of the extreme mold inside some places.

‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.
‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.

Who/what is your biggest inspiration and why?

I am not inspired by one photographer or artist in particular, but I love browsing through photography websites. Every time I see a photo that I like, I ask myself why I find it so interesting. Is it the composition, the color, the depth, etc.? Every year in December (besides this year because of Corona) I exhibit my work in one of the biggest art shows in the world. Art Miami. Here I love to walk around for many days to get inspired by artists all over the world.

‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.

How can we keep up with your work? What is your next project?

The biggest project I was working on before Corona happened is Japan. But because of the virus I had to postpone that trip, the next trip will be Italy or Georgia.

Also I am working on my new (fourth) book which hopefully I will be able to publish it in 2021.

In a life before Corona my artworks are exhibited all over the world through art galleries and art fairs. An overview of my exhibitions are always listed on my website www.daanoe.com.

You can find my work on Facebook and Instagram. The best place to keep track of my work is to become a friend on my exclusive Facebook page. Here I also share stories, videos and new work I only share there.

Daan’s books ‘Touched by Time’, ‘Gift of Time’ and ‘Urban Exploration & Photography’ are available on our in app store and can be redeemed against Yamos points.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
10/09/2020
Artist Interview
Laure Gurdjian
Artist Interview: Daan Oude Elferink

Daan Oude Elferink is a Dutch self-taught photographer who travels the world to explore and capture the beauty of forbidden, decayed and abandoned places. Read our interview to find out more about his work, discover the beauty of decay and learn about the risks and thrills that come with photographing abandoned places…

‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘Garden of Eden’ - A spa in Italy.
‘After School’ – A school for boys in the UK.

When did your interest for decay and abandoned places start?

I was always drawn to adventure and even as a child you could often find me secretly playing in an abandoned factory, not knowing that I would be taking photos of them years later.

But the true passion started in 2008 when I stumbled on an abandoned fortress in Belgium. I climbed the fence and explored the building. There was security on the property, so it was very exciting moving from one building to the other. And there it was… a beautiful decaying staircase. I completely fell in love with it. Not only by the staircase itself, but mostly by the beauty of decay. Not long after, I was caught by the security and thrown off the property. The combination of excitement and beauty really got to me. At that time I knew I was going to look for more places like this. At first every week and in nearby countries. Now it is my job and I am exploring all over the world.

‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tea Time’ – A castle in Belgium.

What is your process?

Usually when I explore an abandoned place, I have no idea what to expect. I don’t even know if I will be able to get inside, but when I do, it’s always a surprise. Sometimes it’s not interesting at all and I will be moving on to another place, but often it’s absolutely stunning. The most tricky locations (for example because it is in the middle of a city, or because there is security) I enter at night so no one can see me go in. Inside I wait until the sun comes up so I can start taking pictures.

I only work with natural light and mostly the places I explore are pretty dark, so besides my cameras and lenses, my flashlights and my tripod are my biggest friends. The rest of my gear depends on the location. Sometimes I need to bring a ladder, ropes, etc. A tool that you might not expect, but what is always in my bag, is a door handle. 10 years ago I was trapped inside a building because a door without a handle slammed shut. I never allow that to happen again ;-)

Inside the building I never start shooting right away (unless there is a big chance I will get caught). First I walk around and take it all in. In my first years I pretty much took pictures from every corner, but now I usually know right away what I am going to shoot and from which corner. That doesn’t mean I’ll be done quickly. Because I am a perfectionist, I can lay under a staircase for many hours to get the result perfectly as I imagine it.

 Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of th

Taking this picture was obviously very risky but it was also very exciting and challenging. The small ledge, that single line of tiles my feet are actually standing on, is the only part of the floor that is still supported from below. The rest of the floor that is still there is more or less floating midair.

 ‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.
‘The 13th Floor’ - A villa in Italy. This is the result of the previous action shot.

Out of all the places you have photographed, which one struck you the most?

That’s a difficult question, because there a so many locations that stand out for different reasons. Some of them because they were so exciting, some of them because they were so beautiful and others because I was blown away by everything that was left behind.

If I have to pick one location, I choose a castle in Belgium. The castle was in terrible shape. Big holes in the floor and in the roof, but everything was left behind. In one room there was a beautiful piano (see my photo ‘Tunes of Decay’), in the other room the table with tableware was left behind. But what struck me the most were the Alfa Romeo sport cars (see my photo ‘Forgotten Alfas’) that were left behind in the basement. Also the exploration was very exciting, because the police showed up while I was inside. I was hiding in the closet, but I managed to escape. In my second book (I have three) ‘Gift of Time’, you can see more pictures of this incredible place and read the full story.

‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Forgotten Alfas’ – A castle in Belgium.

How do you go about finding the places? Do you look for specific things? What particularly strikes your interest?

Finding these places is the hardest part of my job. I have a small group of friends who search and share locations with each other. I use Google and Google Earth to do my research and when I find something that might be interesting, I mark it in Google Earth. When I have enough interesting marks in an area, it’s time to  plan the trip! It’s too dangerous to explore alone and obviously it’s much more fun with a buddy. Mostly I fly to the specific country, rent a car and the adventure can begin!

I am looking for every subject as long as it is abandoned and decaying. I have explored castles, villas, farm houses, hospitals, spa’s, sex clubs, metro tunnels, factories, stranded cars, trains, planes, ships, theme parks, hotels, theaters, etc. The locations that strikes my interest best are places where nature is taking over again.

‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.
‘Ancient Green’ – A Villa in Italy.

How do you feel when you first enter an abandoned building? What goes through your mind when you take pictures?

Exploring an abandoned building for me is a rollercoaster of feelings. Finding a way in is mostly very exciting. Did anybody see or hear me? When I am inside and I think that I am safe, I feel a different kind of excitement when it’s an amazing location. I am blown away. I feel happy, grateful, amazed.

When that first excitement has settled, I get really calm and focused. That is when I start shooting.

What I love about these places is the beauty of decay. When a beautiful place is well preserved, I look at it, enjoy it for a moment and then forget about it. But when a place is abandoned and decayed it tells a story. It ignites the imagination. How did these people live? Why did they leave? What happened?

‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.
‘Waves of Light’ – A cement factory in Italy.

Which obstacles do you face when photographing an abandoned property?

I have been in many exciting situations and some of them have been very dangerous. I have been staring in the barrel of the gun of the police, have been chased down by dogs, met robbers and junkies. Floors have collapsed underneath my feet and I have been very sick because of the extreme mold inside some places.

‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.
‘Forces of Nature’ – A greenhouse in Belgium.

Who/what is your biggest inspiration and why?

I am not inspired by one photographer or artist in particular, but I love browsing through photography websites. Every time I see a photo that I like, I ask myself why I find it so interesting. Is it the composition, the color, the depth, etc.? Every year in December (besides this year because of Corona) I exhibit my work in one of the biggest art shows in the world. Art Miami. Here I love to walk around for many days to get inspired by artists all over the world.

‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.
‘Tunes of Decay’ – A castle in Belgium.

How can we keep up with your work? What is your next project?

The biggest project I was working on before Corona happened is Japan. But because of the virus I had to postpone that trip, the next trip will be Italy or Georgia.

Also I am working on my new (fourth) book which hopefully I will be able to publish it in 2021.

In a life before Corona my artworks are exhibited all over the world through art galleries and art fairs. An overview of my exhibitions are always listed on my website www.daanoe.com.

You can find my work on Facebook and Instagram. The best place to keep track of my work is to become a friend on my exclusive Facebook page. Here I also share stories, videos and new work I only share there.

Daan’s books ‘Touched by Time’, ‘Gift of Time’ and ‘Urban Exploration & Photography’ are available on our in app store and can be redeemed against Yamos points.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
Thanks For Reading
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.