30/07/2021
To Do
Chioma Ince
The Community Exhibition: Hosted by Kunstraum and GUAP Magazine

The Community is an open-call exhibition showing at Kunstraum, featuring artworks from 28 young creatives across London. The works on show range from photography, film, illustration, painting, drawing, collage, and sound art.

Featuring works from artists:

Aisha Mohamed (@artsyblackheaux) | Ajo Alè (@ajoaleart @hpxm_ @bamgbala.studios) | Chi Chi Anthony Maté Langlah (@msshakara) | Ebubechukwu Akojie (@chuk.wu) | Ericka Louis-Marie (@ello_its_ericka) | Gifty Dzenyo (@giftydzenyophotography) | Hallie Primus (@primrose.films) & Qasim Hassan (@Kasim.s.a) | Joshua James Brown (@brwn.stills) | Katya Anastasia (@katyaanastasiaa) | Latoya Fits Okuneye (@___fits___) | Lauriem (@lauriemmusic) | Marissa Mireles Hinds (@sanseriif) | Meemi Maung (@meeminoaka) | Nahuel Contreras (@ncontreras_) | PrinceOke Ugorji (@princethepotato) | Remi Frederick (@remiaphotography) | Rojal Jerome Myers (@rojal_jerome) | Samson Shofoluwe (@shonobi_art) | Saul Jan Samba & Jordan Minga (@samamba11 @mingting_media) | Sondliwe Pamisa (@sondliwe) | Sophia Rooke (@_blacktop__ @blacktop_bysophia) | Tag Agency UK (@tagagencyuk) | Taja Lewis Boodie (@rec.ess) | we are raya (@we.are.raya)

With a roaring exhibition launch, The Community exhibition really lived up to its name. The atmosphere in the cozy East London art space on Roscoe Street was overflowing with joy, love and unity. The former church hall by the Whitecross Street market was filled with people coming to enjoy a celebration of culture, identities, differences and community. As soon as you step into the room, you are greeted with gorgeous and almost ceremonial photographs printed onto fabric of fabulous women giving you Nollywood realness hanging from the ceiling. Immediately your eyes are taken to the vibrant colours on the wall, the beautiful films playing on the screen and the transcending feeling of community and comfort found in London.

Although each artist has a unique visual language and narrative behind their work, the pieces sit in unison. The viewers were really engaging with the works and connecting through their shared experiences and love for art.

image00010.jpg

Here are some pieces from the exhibition that really stood out:

A Crown of Shame: Male Survivors of Sexual Violence in Conflict by AJO ALÈ

This photographic piece raises awareness of the some of the post-traumatic effects of rape experienced by men in Africa. With specific reference to personal accounts from male survivors of sexual violence, the project touches on the failings of our society to properly acknowledge, support and protect these men. Exploring themes of gender-identity, sexual violence, loss of masculinity and community AJO ALÈ takes us on an emotional and riveting journey through this powerful piece.

Between three and five by Sondliwe Pamisa

In this acrylic on linen painting, artist Sondliwe explores the notion that the hours between “3 and 5 are the most dangerous hours in a child’s life”. “Between those hours, as the world we live in operates off of a, 9-5 working schedule for parents and really 9-3 for schooling, there is 2 hours of unsupervised time in kid’s lives.” He explains that the piece is used to pose and to reiterate the question of, what is it that we are doing as adults to prepare the ones coming after to succeed?

Discussing the socio-political challenges young people face as a result of our educational system and postcode wars, Pamisa uses the poetic symbol of the drum in his painting to further question our perception of knowledge, education and communication.

182830120_394423964911805_6648193909255884812_n.jpg

Little Princesses, Myanmar by Meemi Maung

Little Princesses is a photographic exploration of the ceremonial traditions surrounding ear piercings for women. The interdisciplinary creative and visual artist Meemi Maung explains that: “ Among the girls of Myanmar, the ear-piercing ceremony is very important. Burmese women traditionally wear ear-rings as ornaments as well as symbols of their social status. You could say this ceremony is a Burmese/Myanmar Quinceañera, where girls dress extravagantly as if they are princesses.”

image00002.jpeg


Notting Hill Carnival 2019 by Remi Aisha

Notting Hill Carnival 2019 is a photo collage made by Remi Aisha documenting the energy and iconic vibes found at Notting Hill Carnival (which has been cancelled twice due to the pandemic).

SHAKARA by Latoya Okuneye and Michelle Á Okuneye

Created by the photographer and director Latoya Okuneye and hair stylist Michelle Á Okuneye, Shakara is an ode to black Nigerian women in some of their varied and distinct facets. “Shakara which translates to showing off/flair in Yoruba is a photo project which celebrates the role of the 21st century black woman and her influence in beauty/fashion - stepping out from the male gaze and transitioning into something new.”

The exhibition runs from the 27th July - 1st August 2021 and no booking is required.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
30/07/2021
To Do
Chioma Ince
The Community Exhibition: Hosted by Kunstraum and GUAP Magazine

The Community is an open-call exhibition showing at Kunstraum, featuring artworks from 28 young creatives across London. The works on show range from photography, film, illustration, painting, drawing, collage, and sound art.

Featuring works from artists:

Aisha Mohamed (@artsyblackheaux) | Ajo Alè (@ajoaleart @hpxm_ @bamgbala.studios) | Chi Chi Anthony Maté Langlah (@msshakara) | Ebubechukwu Akojie (@chuk.wu) | Ericka Louis-Marie (@ello_its_ericka) | Gifty Dzenyo (@giftydzenyophotography) | Hallie Primus (@primrose.films) & Qasim Hassan (@Kasim.s.a) | Joshua James Brown (@brwn.stills) | Katya Anastasia (@katyaanastasiaa) | Latoya Fits Okuneye (@___fits___) | Lauriem (@lauriemmusic) | Marissa Mireles Hinds (@sanseriif) | Meemi Maung (@meeminoaka) | Nahuel Contreras (@ncontreras_) | PrinceOke Ugorji (@princethepotato) | Remi Frederick (@remiaphotography) | Rojal Jerome Myers (@rojal_jerome) | Samson Shofoluwe (@shonobi_art) | Saul Jan Samba & Jordan Minga (@samamba11 @mingting_media) | Sondliwe Pamisa (@sondliwe) | Sophia Rooke (@_blacktop__ @blacktop_bysophia) | Tag Agency UK (@tagagencyuk) | Taja Lewis Boodie (@rec.ess) | we are raya (@we.are.raya)

With a roaring exhibition launch, The Community exhibition really lived up to its name. The atmosphere in the cozy East London art space on Roscoe Street was overflowing with joy, love and unity. The former church hall by the Whitecross Street market was filled with people coming to enjoy a celebration of culture, identities, differences and community. As soon as you step into the room, you are greeted with gorgeous and almost ceremonial photographs printed onto fabric of fabulous women giving you Nollywood realness hanging from the ceiling. Immediately your eyes are taken to the vibrant colours on the wall, the beautiful films playing on the screen and the transcending feeling of community and comfort found in London.

Although each artist has a unique visual language and narrative behind their work, the pieces sit in unison. The viewers were really engaging with the works and connecting through their shared experiences and love for art.

image00010.jpg

Here are some pieces from the exhibition that really stood out:

A Crown of Shame: Male Survivors of Sexual Violence in Conflict by AJO ALÈ

This photographic piece raises awareness of the some of the post-traumatic effects of rape experienced by men in Africa. With specific reference to personal accounts from male survivors of sexual violence, the project touches on the failings of our society to properly acknowledge, support and protect these men. Exploring themes of gender-identity, sexual violence, loss of masculinity and community AJO ALÈ takes us on an emotional and riveting journey through this powerful piece.

Between three and five by Sondliwe Pamisa

In this acrylic on linen painting, artist Sondliwe explores the notion that the hours between “3 and 5 are the most dangerous hours in a child’s life”. “Between those hours, as the world we live in operates off of a, 9-5 working schedule for parents and really 9-3 for schooling, there is 2 hours of unsupervised time in kid’s lives.” He explains that the piece is used to pose and to reiterate the question of, what is it that we are doing as adults to prepare the ones coming after to succeed?

Discussing the socio-political challenges young people face as a result of our educational system and postcode wars, Pamisa uses the poetic symbol of the drum in his painting to further question our perception of knowledge, education and communication.

182830120_394423964911805_6648193909255884812_n.jpg

Little Princesses, Myanmar by Meemi Maung

Little Princesses is a photographic exploration of the ceremonial traditions surrounding ear piercings for women. The interdisciplinary creative and visual artist Meemi Maung explains that: “ Among the girls of Myanmar, the ear-piercing ceremony is very important. Burmese women traditionally wear ear-rings as ornaments as well as symbols of their social status. You could say this ceremony is a Burmese/Myanmar Quinceañera, where girls dress extravagantly as if they are princesses.”

image00002.jpeg


Notting Hill Carnival 2019 by Remi Aisha

Notting Hill Carnival 2019 is a photo collage made by Remi Aisha documenting the energy and iconic vibes found at Notting Hill Carnival (which has been cancelled twice due to the pandemic).

SHAKARA by Latoya Okuneye and Michelle Á Okuneye

Created by the photographer and director Latoya Okuneye and hair stylist Michelle Á Okuneye, Shakara is an ode to black Nigerian women in some of their varied and distinct facets. “Shakara which translates to showing off/flair in Yoruba is a photo project which celebrates the role of the 21st century black woman and her influence in beauty/fashion - stepping out from the male gaze and transitioning into something new.”

The exhibition runs from the 27th July - 1st August 2021 and no booking is required.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
30/07/2021
To Do
Chioma Ince
The Community Exhibition: Hosted by Kunstraum and GUAP Magazine

The Community is an open-call exhibition showing at Kunstraum, featuring artworks from 28 young creatives across London. The works on show range from photography, film, illustration, painting, drawing, collage, and sound art.

Featuring works from artists:

Aisha Mohamed (@artsyblackheaux) | Ajo Alè (@ajoaleart @hpxm_ @bamgbala.studios) | Chi Chi Anthony Maté Langlah (@msshakara) | Ebubechukwu Akojie (@chuk.wu) | Ericka Louis-Marie (@ello_its_ericka) | Gifty Dzenyo (@giftydzenyophotography) | Hallie Primus (@primrose.films) & Qasim Hassan (@Kasim.s.a) | Joshua James Brown (@brwn.stills) | Katya Anastasia (@katyaanastasiaa) | Latoya Fits Okuneye (@___fits___) | Lauriem (@lauriemmusic) | Marissa Mireles Hinds (@sanseriif) | Meemi Maung (@meeminoaka) | Nahuel Contreras (@ncontreras_) | PrinceOke Ugorji (@princethepotato) | Remi Frederick (@remiaphotography) | Rojal Jerome Myers (@rojal_jerome) | Samson Shofoluwe (@shonobi_art) | Saul Jan Samba & Jordan Minga (@samamba11 @mingting_media) | Sondliwe Pamisa (@sondliwe) | Sophia Rooke (@_blacktop__ @blacktop_bysophia) | Tag Agency UK (@tagagencyuk) | Taja Lewis Boodie (@rec.ess) | we are raya (@we.are.raya)

With a roaring exhibition launch, The Community exhibition really lived up to its name. The atmosphere in the cozy East London art space on Roscoe Street was overflowing with joy, love and unity. The former church hall by the Whitecross Street market was filled with people coming to enjoy a celebration of culture, identities, differences and community. As soon as you step into the room, you are greeted with gorgeous and almost ceremonial photographs printed onto fabric of fabulous women giving you Nollywood realness hanging from the ceiling. Immediately your eyes are taken to the vibrant colours on the wall, the beautiful films playing on the screen and the transcending feeling of community and comfort found in London.

Although each artist has a unique visual language and narrative behind their work, the pieces sit in unison. The viewers were really engaging with the works and connecting through their shared experiences and love for art.

image00010.jpg

Here are some pieces from the exhibition that really stood out:

A Crown of Shame: Male Survivors of Sexual Violence in Conflict by AJO ALÈ

This photographic piece raises awareness of the some of the post-traumatic effects of rape experienced by men in Africa. With specific reference to personal accounts from male survivors of sexual violence, the project touches on the failings of our society to properly acknowledge, support and protect these men. Exploring themes of gender-identity, sexual violence, loss of masculinity and community AJO ALÈ takes us on an emotional and riveting journey through this powerful piece.

Between three and five by Sondliwe Pamisa

In this acrylic on linen painting, artist Sondliwe explores the notion that the hours between “3 and 5 are the most dangerous hours in a child’s life”. “Between those hours, as the world we live in operates off of a, 9-5 working schedule for parents and really 9-3 for schooling, there is 2 hours of unsupervised time in kid’s lives.” He explains that the piece is used to pose and to reiterate the question of, what is it that we are doing as adults to prepare the ones coming after to succeed?

Discussing the socio-political challenges young people face as a result of our educational system and postcode wars, Pamisa uses the poetic symbol of the drum in his painting to further question our perception of knowledge, education and communication.

182830120_394423964911805_6648193909255884812_n.jpg

Little Princesses, Myanmar by Meemi Maung

Little Princesses is a photographic exploration of the ceremonial traditions surrounding ear piercings for women. The interdisciplinary creative and visual artist Meemi Maung explains that: “ Among the girls of Myanmar, the ear-piercing ceremony is very important. Burmese women traditionally wear ear-rings as ornaments as well as symbols of their social status. You could say this ceremony is a Burmese/Myanmar Quinceañera, where girls dress extravagantly as if they are princesses.”

image00002.jpeg


Notting Hill Carnival 2019 by Remi Aisha

Notting Hill Carnival 2019 is a photo collage made by Remi Aisha documenting the energy and iconic vibes found at Notting Hill Carnival (which has been cancelled twice due to the pandemic).

SHAKARA by Latoya Okuneye and Michelle Á Okuneye

Created by the photographer and director Latoya Okuneye and hair stylist Michelle Á Okuneye, Shakara is an ode to black Nigerian women in some of their varied and distinct facets. “Shakara which translates to showing off/flair in Yoruba is a photo project which celebrates the role of the 21st century black woman and her influence in beauty/fashion - stepping out from the male gaze and transitioning into something new.”

The exhibition runs from the 27th July - 1st August 2021 and no booking is required.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
30/07/2021
To Do
Chioma Ince
The Community Exhibition: Hosted by Kunstraum and GUAP Magazine

The Community is an open-call exhibition showing at Kunstraum, featuring artworks from 28 young creatives across London. The works on show range from photography, film, illustration, painting, drawing, collage, and sound art.

Featuring works from artists:

Aisha Mohamed (@artsyblackheaux) | Ajo Alè (@ajoaleart @hpxm_ @bamgbala.studios) | Chi Chi Anthony Maté Langlah (@msshakara) | Ebubechukwu Akojie (@chuk.wu) | Ericka Louis-Marie (@ello_its_ericka) | Gifty Dzenyo (@giftydzenyophotography) | Hallie Primus (@primrose.films) & Qasim Hassan (@Kasim.s.a) | Joshua James Brown (@brwn.stills) | Katya Anastasia (@katyaanastasiaa) | Latoya Fits Okuneye (@___fits___) | Lauriem (@lauriemmusic) | Marissa Mireles Hinds (@sanseriif) | Meemi Maung (@meeminoaka) | Nahuel Contreras (@ncontreras_) | PrinceOke Ugorji (@princethepotato) | Remi Frederick (@remiaphotography) | Rojal Jerome Myers (@rojal_jerome) | Samson Shofoluwe (@shonobi_art) | Saul Jan Samba & Jordan Minga (@samamba11 @mingting_media) | Sondliwe Pamisa (@sondliwe) | Sophia Rooke (@_blacktop__ @blacktop_bysophia) | Tag Agency UK (@tagagencyuk) | Taja Lewis Boodie (@rec.ess) | we are raya (@we.are.raya)

With a roaring exhibition launch, The Community exhibition really lived up to its name. The atmosphere in the cozy East London art space on Roscoe Street was overflowing with joy, love and unity. The former church hall by the Whitecross Street market was filled with people coming to enjoy a celebration of culture, identities, differences and community. As soon as you step into the room, you are greeted with gorgeous and almost ceremonial photographs printed onto fabric of fabulous women giving you Nollywood realness hanging from the ceiling. Immediately your eyes are taken to the vibrant colours on the wall, the beautiful films playing on the screen and the transcending feeling of community and comfort found in London.

Although each artist has a unique visual language and narrative behind their work, the pieces sit in unison. The viewers were really engaging with the works and connecting through their shared experiences and love for art.

image00010.jpg

Here are some pieces from the exhibition that really stood out:

A Crown of Shame: Male Survivors of Sexual Violence in Conflict by AJO ALÈ

This photographic piece raises awareness of the some of the post-traumatic effects of rape experienced by men in Africa. With specific reference to personal accounts from male survivors of sexual violence, the project touches on the failings of our society to properly acknowledge, support and protect these men. Exploring themes of gender-identity, sexual violence, loss of masculinity and community AJO ALÈ takes us on an emotional and riveting journey through this powerful piece.

Between three and five by Sondliwe Pamisa

In this acrylic on linen painting, artist Sondliwe explores the notion that the hours between “3 and 5 are the most dangerous hours in a child’s life”. “Between those hours, as the world we live in operates off of a, 9-5 working schedule for parents and really 9-3 for schooling, there is 2 hours of unsupervised time in kid’s lives.” He explains that the piece is used to pose and to reiterate the question of, what is it that we are doing as adults to prepare the ones coming after to succeed?

Discussing the socio-political challenges young people face as a result of our educational system and postcode wars, Pamisa uses the poetic symbol of the drum in his painting to further question our perception of knowledge, education and communication.

182830120_394423964911805_6648193909255884812_n.jpg

Little Princesses, Myanmar by Meemi Maung

Little Princesses is a photographic exploration of the ceremonial traditions surrounding ear piercings for women. The interdisciplinary creative and visual artist Meemi Maung explains that: “ Among the girls of Myanmar, the ear-piercing ceremony is very important. Burmese women traditionally wear ear-rings as ornaments as well as symbols of their social status. You could say this ceremony is a Burmese/Myanmar Quinceañera, where girls dress extravagantly as if they are princesses.”

image00002.jpeg


Notting Hill Carnival 2019 by Remi Aisha

Notting Hill Carnival 2019 is a photo collage made by Remi Aisha documenting the energy and iconic vibes found at Notting Hill Carnival (which has been cancelled twice due to the pandemic).

SHAKARA by Latoya Okuneye and Michelle Á Okuneye

Created by the photographer and director Latoya Okuneye and hair stylist Michelle Á Okuneye, Shakara is an ode to black Nigerian women in some of their varied and distinct facets. “Shakara which translates to showing off/flair in Yoruba is a photo project which celebrates the role of the 21st century black woman and her influence in beauty/fashion - stepping out from the male gaze and transitioning into something new.”

The exhibition runs from the 27th July - 1st August 2021 and no booking is required.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
30/07/2021
To Do
Chioma Ince
The Community Exhibition: Hosted by Kunstraum and GUAP Magazine

The Community is an open-call exhibition showing at Kunstraum, featuring artworks from 28 young creatives across London. The works on show range from photography, film, illustration, painting, drawing, collage, and sound art.

Featuring works from artists:

Aisha Mohamed (@artsyblackheaux) | Ajo Alè (@ajoaleart @hpxm_ @bamgbala.studios) | Chi Chi Anthony Maté Langlah (@msshakara) | Ebubechukwu Akojie (@chuk.wu) | Ericka Louis-Marie (@ello_its_ericka) | Gifty Dzenyo (@giftydzenyophotography) | Hallie Primus (@primrose.films) & Qasim Hassan (@Kasim.s.a) | Joshua James Brown (@brwn.stills) | Katya Anastasia (@katyaanastasiaa) | Latoya Fits Okuneye (@___fits___) | Lauriem (@lauriemmusic) | Marissa Mireles Hinds (@sanseriif) | Meemi Maung (@meeminoaka) | Nahuel Contreras (@ncontreras_) | PrinceOke Ugorji (@princethepotato) | Remi Frederick (@remiaphotography) | Rojal Jerome Myers (@rojal_jerome) | Samson Shofoluwe (@shonobi_art) | Saul Jan Samba & Jordan Minga (@samamba11 @mingting_media) | Sondliwe Pamisa (@sondliwe) | Sophia Rooke (@_blacktop__ @blacktop_bysophia) | Tag Agency UK (@tagagencyuk) | Taja Lewis Boodie (@rec.ess) | we are raya (@we.are.raya)

With a roaring exhibition launch, The Community exhibition really lived up to its name. The atmosphere in the cozy East London art space on Roscoe Street was overflowing with joy, love and unity. The former church hall by the Whitecross Street market was filled with people coming to enjoy a celebration of culture, identities, differences and community. As soon as you step into the room, you are greeted with gorgeous and almost ceremonial photographs printed onto fabric of fabulous women giving you Nollywood realness hanging from the ceiling. Immediately your eyes are taken to the vibrant colours on the wall, the beautiful films playing on the screen and the transcending feeling of community and comfort found in London.

Although each artist has a unique visual language and narrative behind their work, the pieces sit in unison. The viewers were really engaging with the works and connecting through their shared experiences and love for art.

image00010.jpg

Here are some pieces from the exhibition that really stood out:

A Crown of Shame: Male Survivors of Sexual Violence in Conflict by AJO ALÈ

This photographic piece raises awareness of the some of the post-traumatic effects of rape experienced by men in Africa. With specific reference to personal accounts from male survivors of sexual violence, the project touches on the failings of our society to properly acknowledge, support and protect these men. Exploring themes of gender-identity, sexual violence, loss of masculinity and community AJO ALÈ takes us on an emotional and riveting journey through this powerful piece.

Between three and five by Sondliwe Pamisa

In this acrylic on linen painting, artist Sondliwe explores the notion that the hours between “3 and 5 are the most dangerous hours in a child’s life”. “Between those hours, as the world we live in operates off of a, 9-5 working schedule for parents and really 9-3 for schooling, there is 2 hours of unsupervised time in kid’s lives.” He explains that the piece is used to pose and to reiterate the question of, what is it that we are doing as adults to prepare the ones coming after to succeed?

Discussing the socio-political challenges young people face as a result of our educational system and postcode wars, Pamisa uses the poetic symbol of the drum in his painting to further question our perception of knowledge, education and communication.

182830120_394423964911805_6648193909255884812_n.jpg

Little Princesses, Myanmar by Meemi Maung

Little Princesses is a photographic exploration of the ceremonial traditions surrounding ear piercings for women. The interdisciplinary creative and visual artist Meemi Maung explains that: “ Among the girls of Myanmar, the ear-piercing ceremony is very important. Burmese women traditionally wear ear-rings as ornaments as well as symbols of their social status. You could say this ceremony is a Burmese/Myanmar Quinceañera, where girls dress extravagantly as if they are princesses.”

image00002.jpeg


Notting Hill Carnival 2019 by Remi Aisha

Notting Hill Carnival 2019 is a photo collage made by Remi Aisha documenting the energy and iconic vibes found at Notting Hill Carnival (which has been cancelled twice due to the pandemic).

SHAKARA by Latoya Okuneye and Michelle Á Okuneye

Created by the photographer and director Latoya Okuneye and hair stylist Michelle Á Okuneye, Shakara is an ode to black Nigerian women in some of their varied and distinct facets. “Shakara which translates to showing off/flair in Yoruba is a photo project which celebrates the role of the 21st century black woman and her influence in beauty/fashion - stepping out from the male gaze and transitioning into something new.”

The exhibition runs from the 27th July - 1st August 2021 and no booking is required.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
30/07/2021
To Do
Chioma Ince
The Community Exhibition: Hosted by Kunstraum and GUAP Magazine

The Community is an open-call exhibition showing at Kunstraum, featuring artworks from 28 young creatives across London. The works on show range from photography, film, illustration, painting, drawing, collage, and sound art.

Featuring works from artists:

Aisha Mohamed (@artsyblackheaux) | Ajo Alè (@ajoaleart @hpxm_ @bamgbala.studios) | Chi Chi Anthony Maté Langlah (@msshakara) | Ebubechukwu Akojie (@chuk.wu) | Ericka Louis-Marie (@ello_its_ericka) | Gifty Dzenyo (@giftydzenyophotography) | Hallie Primus (@primrose.films) & Qasim Hassan (@Kasim.s.a) | Joshua James Brown (@brwn.stills) | Katya Anastasia (@katyaanastasiaa) | Latoya Fits Okuneye (@___fits___) | Lauriem (@lauriemmusic) | Marissa Mireles Hinds (@sanseriif) | Meemi Maung (@meeminoaka) | Nahuel Contreras (@ncontreras_) | PrinceOke Ugorji (@princethepotato) | Remi Frederick (@remiaphotography) | Rojal Jerome Myers (@rojal_jerome) | Samson Shofoluwe (@shonobi_art) | Saul Jan Samba & Jordan Minga (@samamba11 @mingting_media) | Sondliwe Pamisa (@sondliwe) | Sophia Rooke (@_blacktop__ @blacktop_bysophia) | Tag Agency UK (@tagagencyuk) | Taja Lewis Boodie (@rec.ess) | we are raya (@we.are.raya)

With a roaring exhibition launch, The Community exhibition really lived up to its name. The atmosphere in the cozy East London art space on Roscoe Street was overflowing with joy, love and unity. The former church hall by the Whitecross Street market was filled with people coming to enjoy a celebration of culture, identities, differences and community. As soon as you step into the room, you are greeted with gorgeous and almost ceremonial photographs printed onto fabric of fabulous women giving you Nollywood realness hanging from the ceiling. Immediately your eyes are taken to the vibrant colours on the wall, the beautiful films playing on the screen and the transcending feeling of community and comfort found in London.

Although each artist has a unique visual language and narrative behind their work, the pieces sit in unison. The viewers were really engaging with the works and connecting through their shared experiences and love for art.

image00010.jpg

Here are some pieces from the exhibition that really stood out:

A Crown of Shame: Male Survivors of Sexual Violence in Conflict by AJO ALÈ

This photographic piece raises awareness of the some of the post-traumatic effects of rape experienced by men in Africa. With specific reference to personal accounts from male survivors of sexual violence, the project touches on the failings of our society to properly acknowledge, support and protect these men. Exploring themes of gender-identity, sexual violence, loss of masculinity and community AJO ALÈ takes us on an emotional and riveting journey through this powerful piece.

Between three and five by Sondliwe Pamisa

In this acrylic on linen painting, artist Sondliwe explores the notion that the hours between “3 and 5 are the most dangerous hours in a child’s life”. “Between those hours, as the world we live in operates off of a, 9-5 working schedule for parents and really 9-3 for schooling, there is 2 hours of unsupervised time in kid’s lives.” He explains that the piece is used to pose and to reiterate the question of, what is it that we are doing as adults to prepare the ones coming after to succeed?

Discussing the socio-political challenges young people face as a result of our educational system and postcode wars, Pamisa uses the poetic symbol of the drum in his painting to further question our perception of knowledge, education and communication.

182830120_394423964911805_6648193909255884812_n.jpg

Little Princesses, Myanmar by Meemi Maung

Little Princesses is a photographic exploration of the ceremonial traditions surrounding ear piercings for women. The interdisciplinary creative and visual artist Meemi Maung explains that: “ Among the girls of Myanmar, the ear-piercing ceremony is very important. Burmese women traditionally wear ear-rings as ornaments as well as symbols of their social status. You could say this ceremony is a Burmese/Myanmar Quinceañera, where girls dress extravagantly as if they are princesses.”

image00002.jpeg


Notting Hill Carnival 2019 by Remi Aisha

Notting Hill Carnival 2019 is a photo collage made by Remi Aisha documenting the energy and iconic vibes found at Notting Hill Carnival (which has been cancelled twice due to the pandemic).

SHAKARA by Latoya Okuneye and Michelle Á Okuneye

Created by the photographer and director Latoya Okuneye and hair stylist Michelle Á Okuneye, Shakara is an ode to black Nigerian women in some of their varied and distinct facets. “Shakara which translates to showing off/flair in Yoruba is a photo project which celebrates the role of the 21st century black woman and her influence in beauty/fashion - stepping out from the male gaze and transitioning into something new.”

The exhibition runs from the 27th July - 1st August 2021 and no booking is required.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
30/07/2021
To Do
Chioma Ince
The Community Exhibition: Hosted by Kunstraum and GUAP Magazine

The Community is an open-call exhibition showing at Kunstraum, featuring artworks from 28 young creatives across London. The works on show range from photography, film, illustration, painting, drawing, collage, and sound art.

Featuring works from artists:

Aisha Mohamed (@artsyblackheaux) | Ajo Alè (@ajoaleart @hpxm_ @bamgbala.studios) | Chi Chi Anthony Maté Langlah (@msshakara) | Ebubechukwu Akojie (@chuk.wu) | Ericka Louis-Marie (@ello_its_ericka) | Gifty Dzenyo (@giftydzenyophotography) | Hallie Primus (@primrose.films) & Qasim Hassan (@Kasim.s.a) | Joshua James Brown (@brwn.stills) | Katya Anastasia (@katyaanastasiaa) | Latoya Fits Okuneye (@___fits___) | Lauriem (@lauriemmusic) | Marissa Mireles Hinds (@sanseriif) | Meemi Maung (@meeminoaka) | Nahuel Contreras (@ncontreras_) | PrinceOke Ugorji (@princethepotato) | Remi Frederick (@remiaphotography) | Rojal Jerome Myers (@rojal_jerome) | Samson Shofoluwe (@shonobi_art) | Saul Jan Samba & Jordan Minga (@samamba11 @mingting_media) | Sondliwe Pamisa (@sondliwe) | Sophia Rooke (@_blacktop__ @blacktop_bysophia) | Tag Agency UK (@tagagencyuk) | Taja Lewis Boodie (@rec.ess) | we are raya (@we.are.raya)

With a roaring exhibition launch, The Community exhibition really lived up to its name. The atmosphere in the cozy East London art space on Roscoe Street was overflowing with joy, love and unity. The former church hall by the Whitecross Street market was filled with people coming to enjoy a celebration of culture, identities, differences and community. As soon as you step into the room, you are greeted with gorgeous and almost ceremonial photographs printed onto fabric of fabulous women giving you Nollywood realness hanging from the ceiling. Immediately your eyes are taken to the vibrant colours on the wall, the beautiful films playing on the screen and the transcending feeling of community and comfort found in London.

Although each artist has a unique visual language and narrative behind their work, the pieces sit in unison. The viewers were really engaging with the works and connecting through their shared experiences and love for art.

image00010.jpg

Here are some pieces from the exhibition that really stood out:

A Crown of Shame: Male Survivors of Sexual Violence in Conflict by AJO ALÈ

This photographic piece raises awareness of the some of the post-traumatic effects of rape experienced by men in Africa. With specific reference to personal accounts from male survivors of sexual violence, the project touches on the failings of our society to properly acknowledge, support and protect these men. Exploring themes of gender-identity, sexual violence, loss of masculinity and community AJO ALÈ takes us on an emotional and riveting journey through this powerful piece.

Between three and five by Sondliwe Pamisa

In this acrylic on linen painting, artist Sondliwe explores the notion that the hours between “3 and 5 are the most dangerous hours in a child’s life”. “Between those hours, as the world we live in operates off of a, 9-5 working schedule for parents and really 9-3 for schooling, there is 2 hours of unsupervised time in kid’s lives.” He explains that the piece is used to pose and to reiterate the question of, what is it that we are doing as adults to prepare the ones coming after to succeed?

Discussing the socio-political challenges young people face as a result of our educational system and postcode wars, Pamisa uses the poetic symbol of the drum in his painting to further question our perception of knowledge, education and communication.

182830120_394423964911805_6648193909255884812_n.jpg

Little Princesses, Myanmar by Meemi Maung

Little Princesses is a photographic exploration of the ceremonial traditions surrounding ear piercings for women. The interdisciplinary creative and visual artist Meemi Maung explains that: “ Among the girls of Myanmar, the ear-piercing ceremony is very important. Burmese women traditionally wear ear-rings as ornaments as well as symbols of their social status. You could say this ceremony is a Burmese/Myanmar Quinceañera, where girls dress extravagantly as if they are princesses.”

image00002.jpeg


Notting Hill Carnival 2019 by Remi Aisha

Notting Hill Carnival 2019 is a photo collage made by Remi Aisha documenting the energy and iconic vibes found at Notting Hill Carnival (which has been cancelled twice due to the pandemic).

SHAKARA by Latoya Okuneye and Michelle Á Okuneye

Created by the photographer and director Latoya Okuneye and hair stylist Michelle Á Okuneye, Shakara is an ode to black Nigerian women in some of their varied and distinct facets. “Shakara which translates to showing off/flair in Yoruba is a photo project which celebrates the role of the 21st century black woman and her influence in beauty/fashion - stepping out from the male gaze and transitioning into something new.”

The exhibition runs from the 27th July - 1st August 2021 and no booking is required.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
30/07/2021
To Do
Chioma Ince
The Community Exhibition: Hosted by Kunstraum and GUAP Magazine

The Community is an open-call exhibition showing at Kunstraum, featuring artworks from 28 young creatives across London. The works on show range from photography, film, illustration, painting, drawing, collage, and sound art.

Featuring works from artists:

Aisha Mohamed (@artsyblackheaux) | Ajo Alè (@ajoaleart @hpxm_ @bamgbala.studios) | Chi Chi Anthony Maté Langlah (@msshakara) | Ebubechukwu Akojie (@chuk.wu) | Ericka Louis-Marie (@ello_its_ericka) | Gifty Dzenyo (@giftydzenyophotography) | Hallie Primus (@primrose.films) & Qasim Hassan (@Kasim.s.a) | Joshua James Brown (@brwn.stills) | Katya Anastasia (@katyaanastasiaa) | Latoya Fits Okuneye (@___fits___) | Lauriem (@lauriemmusic) | Marissa Mireles Hinds (@sanseriif) | Meemi Maung (@meeminoaka) | Nahuel Contreras (@ncontreras_) | PrinceOke Ugorji (@princethepotato) | Remi Frederick (@remiaphotography) | Rojal Jerome Myers (@rojal_jerome) | Samson Shofoluwe (@shonobi_art) | Saul Jan Samba & Jordan Minga (@samamba11 @mingting_media) | Sondliwe Pamisa (@sondliwe) | Sophia Rooke (@_blacktop__ @blacktop_bysophia) | Tag Agency UK (@tagagencyuk) | Taja Lewis Boodie (@rec.ess) | we are raya (@we.are.raya)

With a roaring exhibition launch, The Community exhibition really lived up to its name. The atmosphere in the cozy East London art space on Roscoe Street was overflowing with joy, love and unity. The former church hall by the Whitecross Street market was filled with people coming to enjoy a celebration of culture, identities, differences and community. As soon as you step into the room, you are greeted with gorgeous and almost ceremonial photographs printed onto fabric of fabulous women giving you Nollywood realness hanging from the ceiling. Immediately your eyes are taken to the vibrant colours on the wall, the beautiful films playing on the screen and the transcending feeling of community and comfort found in London.

Although each artist has a unique visual language and narrative behind their work, the pieces sit in unison. The viewers were really engaging with the works and connecting through their shared experiences and love for art.

image00010.jpg

Here are some pieces from the exhibition that really stood out:

A Crown of Shame: Male Survivors of Sexual Violence in Conflict by AJO ALÈ

This photographic piece raises awareness of the some of the post-traumatic effects of rape experienced by men in Africa. With specific reference to personal accounts from male survivors of sexual violence, the project touches on the failings of our society to properly acknowledge, support and protect these men. Exploring themes of gender-identity, sexual violence, loss of masculinity and community AJO ALÈ takes us on an emotional and riveting journey through this powerful piece.

Between three and five by Sondliwe Pamisa

In this acrylic on linen painting, artist Sondliwe explores the notion that the hours between “3 and 5 are the most dangerous hours in a child’s life”. “Between those hours, as the world we live in operates off of a, 9-5 working schedule for parents and really 9-3 for schooling, there is 2 hours of unsupervised time in kid’s lives.” He explains that the piece is used to pose and to reiterate the question of, what is it that we are doing as adults to prepare the ones coming after to succeed?

Discussing the socio-political challenges young people face as a result of our educational system and postcode wars, Pamisa uses the poetic symbol of the drum in his painting to further question our perception of knowledge, education and communication.

182830120_394423964911805_6648193909255884812_n.jpg

Little Princesses, Myanmar by Meemi Maung

Little Princesses is a photographic exploration of the ceremonial traditions surrounding ear piercings for women. The interdisciplinary creative and visual artist Meemi Maung explains that: “ Among the girls of Myanmar, the ear-piercing ceremony is very important. Burmese women traditionally wear ear-rings as ornaments as well as symbols of their social status. You could say this ceremony is a Burmese/Myanmar Quinceañera, where girls dress extravagantly as if they are princesses.”

image00002.jpeg


Notting Hill Carnival 2019 by Remi Aisha

Notting Hill Carnival 2019 is a photo collage made by Remi Aisha documenting the energy and iconic vibes found at Notting Hill Carnival (which has been cancelled twice due to the pandemic).

SHAKARA by Latoya Okuneye and Michelle Á Okuneye

Created by the photographer and director Latoya Okuneye and hair stylist Michelle Á Okuneye, Shakara is an ode to black Nigerian women in some of their varied and distinct facets. “Shakara which translates to showing off/flair in Yoruba is a photo project which celebrates the role of the 21st century black woman and her influence in beauty/fashion - stepping out from the male gaze and transitioning into something new.”

The exhibition runs from the 27th July - 1st August 2021 and no booking is required.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
30/07/2021
To Do
Chioma Ince
The Community Exhibition: Hosted by Kunstraum and GUAP Magazine

The Community is an open-call exhibition showing at Kunstraum, featuring artworks from 28 young creatives across London. The works on show range from photography, film, illustration, painting, drawing, collage, and sound art.

Featuring works from artists:

Aisha Mohamed (@artsyblackheaux) | Ajo Alè (@ajoaleart @hpxm_ @bamgbala.studios) | Chi Chi Anthony Maté Langlah (@msshakara) | Ebubechukwu Akojie (@chuk.wu) | Ericka Louis-Marie (@ello_its_ericka) | Gifty Dzenyo (@giftydzenyophotography) | Hallie Primus (@primrose.films) & Qasim Hassan (@Kasim.s.a) | Joshua James Brown (@brwn.stills) | Katya Anastasia (@katyaanastasiaa) | Latoya Fits Okuneye (@___fits___) | Lauriem (@lauriemmusic) | Marissa Mireles Hinds (@sanseriif) | Meemi Maung (@meeminoaka) | Nahuel Contreras (@ncontreras_) | PrinceOke Ugorji (@princethepotato) | Remi Frederick (@remiaphotography) | Rojal Jerome Myers (@rojal_jerome) | Samson Shofoluwe (@shonobi_art) | Saul Jan Samba & Jordan Minga (@samamba11 @mingting_media) | Sondliwe Pamisa (@sondliwe) | Sophia Rooke (@_blacktop__ @blacktop_bysophia) | Tag Agency UK (@tagagencyuk) | Taja Lewis Boodie (@rec.ess) | we are raya (@we.are.raya)

With a roaring exhibition launch, The Community exhibition really lived up to its name. The atmosphere in the cozy East London art space on Roscoe Street was overflowing with joy, love and unity. The former church hall by the Whitecross Street market was filled with people coming to enjoy a celebration of culture, identities, differences and community. As soon as you step into the room, you are greeted with gorgeous and almost ceremonial photographs printed onto fabric of fabulous women giving you Nollywood realness hanging from the ceiling. Immediately your eyes are taken to the vibrant colours on the wall, the beautiful films playing on the screen and the transcending feeling of community and comfort found in London.

Although each artist has a unique visual language and narrative behind their work, the pieces sit in unison. The viewers were really engaging with the works and connecting through their shared experiences and love for art.

image00010.jpg

Here are some pieces from the exhibition that really stood out:

A Crown of Shame: Male Survivors of Sexual Violence in Conflict by AJO ALÈ

This photographic piece raises awareness of the some of the post-traumatic effects of rape experienced by men in Africa. With specific reference to personal accounts from male survivors of sexual violence, the project touches on the failings of our society to properly acknowledge, support and protect these men. Exploring themes of gender-identity, sexual violence, loss of masculinity and community AJO ALÈ takes us on an emotional and riveting journey through this powerful piece.

Between three and five by Sondliwe Pamisa

In this acrylic on linen painting, artist Sondliwe explores the notion that the hours between “3 and 5 are the most dangerous hours in a child’s life”. “Between those hours, as the world we live in operates off of a, 9-5 working schedule for parents and really 9-3 for schooling, there is 2 hours of unsupervised time in kid’s lives.” He explains that the piece is used to pose and to reiterate the question of, what is it that we are doing as adults to prepare the ones coming after to succeed?

Discussing the socio-political challenges young people face as a result of our educational system and postcode wars, Pamisa uses the poetic symbol of the drum in his painting to further question our perception of knowledge, education and communication.

182830120_394423964911805_6648193909255884812_n.jpg

Little Princesses, Myanmar by Meemi Maung

Little Princesses is a photographic exploration of the ceremonial traditions surrounding ear piercings for women. The interdisciplinary creative and visual artist Meemi Maung explains that: “ Among the girls of Myanmar, the ear-piercing ceremony is very important. Burmese women traditionally wear ear-rings as ornaments as well as symbols of their social status. You could say this ceremony is a Burmese/Myanmar Quinceañera, where girls dress extravagantly as if they are princesses.”

image00002.jpeg


Notting Hill Carnival 2019 by Remi Aisha

Notting Hill Carnival 2019 is a photo collage made by Remi Aisha documenting the energy and iconic vibes found at Notting Hill Carnival (which has been cancelled twice due to the pandemic).

SHAKARA by Latoya Okuneye and Michelle Á Okuneye

Created by the photographer and director Latoya Okuneye and hair stylist Michelle Á Okuneye, Shakara is an ode to black Nigerian women in some of their varied and distinct facets. “Shakara which translates to showing off/flair in Yoruba is a photo project which celebrates the role of the 21st century black woman and her influence in beauty/fashion - stepping out from the male gaze and transitioning into something new.”

The exhibition runs from the 27th July - 1st August 2021 and no booking is required.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
Thanks For Reading
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