29/04/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We take a look at some of the biggest stories in the art world over the past month

Simone Leigh with her Golden Lion, courtesy of Venice Biennale

Golden Lion Winners at the Venice Biennale

The Golden Lions - the top awards at the Venice Biennale - were this year awarded to Simon Leigh and Sonia Boyce, marking the first time that both honours have been awarded to black women. Representing the United States, Leigh won the prize in recognition of her 16-foot sculpture Brick House, depicting a building-like structure combined with the form of an eyeless black female figure. Boyce, meanwhile, won for the British pavilion, with her installation similarly focusing on black women; in this case their often unsung contribution to the country’s musical history, reflecting her own initial rise within the 1980s Black British Arts movement. Other awards presented at the Biennale included the Silver Lion, awarded to Lebanese artist Ali Cherri for his video installation Of Men and Gods and Mud, as well as Lifetime Achievement Awards given to Cecilia Vicuña and Katharina Fritsch, both of whom were also featured in the main show.

Exterior of Tate Liverpool

Turner Prize Nominees Announced

The nominees of this year’s Turner Prize - one of the country’s most prestigious art awards - have been announced, with Heather Phillipson, Ingrid Pollard, Veronica Ryan and Sin Wai Kin all up for the prize. The announcement comes as a somewhat more traditional one following last year’s reveal that all the nominees were collectives rather than individual artists, though there is still room for controversy; the nominees of the 2019 award, for instance, shared the cash prize amongst themselves, while in 2020 the award was abandoned altogether in favour of giving out grants. An exhibition of the nominees’ works will take place at the Tate Liverpool, with the eventual winner of the prize being awarded £25,000, and runners-up receiving £10,000.

Oba Head Africa, West Africa, Nigeria, Edo State, Benin (19th century)

Glasgow Returns Benin Bronzes

Following the repatriation of artefacts looted in the colonial era across the world, politicians in Glasgow have voted to return 17 Benin Bronzes held by the city. The move follows a wave of museums across the world working to repatriate art and artefacts belonging to other nations, kick-started by Germany’s commitment to returning all their Benin Bronzes starting this year, with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art quickly following suit. The Benin Bronzes is the name given to the collection of objects looted by British troops from the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, which were subsequently sold off to other nations. Upon their return, the Bronzes are expected to be displayed in the Edo Museum of West African Art in Benin City, Nigeria, currently under construction. The decision also comes months after the resurgence of debate concerning the British Museum’s ownership of the Parthenon Marbles, with Greek prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis imploring Boris Johnson to return the frieze to “the city and the world monument to which it rightfully belongs” to no avail.

Hermann Nitsch, photographed by Philipp Schuster, 2017

Hermann Nitsch dies

The provocative Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch passed away at the age of 83 on18th April following an unspecified illness. The founding member of the controversial Viennese Actionism movement, an exhibition on his work curated by Zuecca Projects and Helmut Essl titled Hermann Nitsch’s 20th Painting Action opened in Venice on the day he died to coincide with the opening of the Venice Biennale. While his work, particularly the series of performances pieces Orgies Mysteries Theatre, was often the target of controversy for his use of blood, viscera and animal carcases, Nitsch maintain that his aim was never simply to shock, but to portray an intensity reflecting that of ancient tragedy, Shakespeare and Vagner. This intensity, he wrote, was a response to his birth and early life in Austria under Nazi rule which left his a staunch opponent of fascism and nationalism in all its forms. Speaking about Nitsch’s death, Helmut Essl said that he hoped his Venice exhibition would “bring his art even closer to the world”.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
29/04/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We take a look at some of the biggest stories in the art world over the past month

Simone Leigh with her Golden Lion, courtesy of Venice Biennale

Golden Lion Winners at the Venice Biennale

The Golden Lions - the top awards at the Venice Biennale - were this year awarded to Simon Leigh and Sonia Boyce, marking the first time that both honours have been awarded to black women. Representing the United States, Leigh won the prize in recognition of her 16-foot sculpture Brick House, depicting a building-like structure combined with the form of an eyeless black female figure. Boyce, meanwhile, won for the British pavilion, with her installation similarly focusing on black women; in this case their often unsung contribution to the country’s musical history, reflecting her own initial rise within the 1980s Black British Arts movement. Other awards presented at the Biennale included the Silver Lion, awarded to Lebanese artist Ali Cherri for his video installation Of Men and Gods and Mud, as well as Lifetime Achievement Awards given to Cecilia Vicuña and Katharina Fritsch, both of whom were also featured in the main show.

Exterior of Tate Liverpool

Turner Prize Nominees Announced

The nominees of this year’s Turner Prize - one of the country’s most prestigious art awards - have been announced, with Heather Phillipson, Ingrid Pollard, Veronica Ryan and Sin Wai Kin all up for the prize. The announcement comes as a somewhat more traditional one following last year’s reveal that all the nominees were collectives rather than individual artists, though there is still room for controversy; the nominees of the 2019 award, for instance, shared the cash prize amongst themselves, while in 2020 the award was abandoned altogether in favour of giving out grants. An exhibition of the nominees’ works will take place at the Tate Liverpool, with the eventual winner of the prize being awarded £25,000, and runners-up receiving £10,000.

Oba Head Africa, West Africa, Nigeria, Edo State, Benin (19th century)

Glasgow Returns Benin Bronzes

Following the repatriation of artefacts looted in the colonial era across the world, politicians in Glasgow have voted to return 17 Benin Bronzes held by the city. The move follows a wave of museums across the world working to repatriate art and artefacts belonging to other nations, kick-started by Germany’s commitment to returning all their Benin Bronzes starting this year, with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art quickly following suit. The Benin Bronzes is the name given to the collection of objects looted by British troops from the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, which were subsequently sold off to other nations. Upon their return, the Bronzes are expected to be displayed in the Edo Museum of West African Art in Benin City, Nigeria, currently under construction. The decision also comes months after the resurgence of debate concerning the British Museum’s ownership of the Parthenon Marbles, with Greek prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis imploring Boris Johnson to return the frieze to “the city and the world monument to which it rightfully belongs” to no avail.

Hermann Nitsch, photographed by Philipp Schuster, 2017

Hermann Nitsch dies

The provocative Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch passed away at the age of 83 on18th April following an unspecified illness. The founding member of the controversial Viennese Actionism movement, an exhibition on his work curated by Zuecca Projects and Helmut Essl titled Hermann Nitsch’s 20th Painting Action opened in Venice on the day he died to coincide with the opening of the Venice Biennale. While his work, particularly the series of performances pieces Orgies Mysteries Theatre, was often the target of controversy for his use of blood, viscera and animal carcases, Nitsch maintain that his aim was never simply to shock, but to portray an intensity reflecting that of ancient tragedy, Shakespeare and Vagner. This intensity, he wrote, was a response to his birth and early life in Austria under Nazi rule which left his a staunch opponent of fascism and nationalism in all its forms. Speaking about Nitsch’s death, Helmut Essl said that he hoped his Venice exhibition would “bring his art even closer to the world”.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
29/04/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We take a look at some of the biggest stories in the art world over the past month

Simone Leigh with her Golden Lion, courtesy of Venice Biennale

Golden Lion Winners at the Venice Biennale

The Golden Lions - the top awards at the Venice Biennale - were this year awarded to Simon Leigh and Sonia Boyce, marking the first time that both honours have been awarded to black women. Representing the United States, Leigh won the prize in recognition of her 16-foot sculpture Brick House, depicting a building-like structure combined with the form of an eyeless black female figure. Boyce, meanwhile, won for the British pavilion, with her installation similarly focusing on black women; in this case their often unsung contribution to the country’s musical history, reflecting her own initial rise within the 1980s Black British Arts movement. Other awards presented at the Biennale included the Silver Lion, awarded to Lebanese artist Ali Cherri for his video installation Of Men and Gods and Mud, as well as Lifetime Achievement Awards given to Cecilia Vicuña and Katharina Fritsch, both of whom were also featured in the main show.

Exterior of Tate Liverpool

Turner Prize Nominees Announced

The nominees of this year’s Turner Prize - one of the country’s most prestigious art awards - have been announced, with Heather Phillipson, Ingrid Pollard, Veronica Ryan and Sin Wai Kin all up for the prize. The announcement comes as a somewhat more traditional one following last year’s reveal that all the nominees were collectives rather than individual artists, though there is still room for controversy; the nominees of the 2019 award, for instance, shared the cash prize amongst themselves, while in 2020 the award was abandoned altogether in favour of giving out grants. An exhibition of the nominees’ works will take place at the Tate Liverpool, with the eventual winner of the prize being awarded £25,000, and runners-up receiving £10,000.

Oba Head Africa, West Africa, Nigeria, Edo State, Benin (19th century)

Glasgow Returns Benin Bronzes

Following the repatriation of artefacts looted in the colonial era across the world, politicians in Glasgow have voted to return 17 Benin Bronzes held by the city. The move follows a wave of museums across the world working to repatriate art and artefacts belonging to other nations, kick-started by Germany’s commitment to returning all their Benin Bronzes starting this year, with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art quickly following suit. The Benin Bronzes is the name given to the collection of objects looted by British troops from the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, which were subsequently sold off to other nations. Upon their return, the Bronzes are expected to be displayed in the Edo Museum of West African Art in Benin City, Nigeria, currently under construction. The decision also comes months after the resurgence of debate concerning the British Museum’s ownership of the Parthenon Marbles, with Greek prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis imploring Boris Johnson to return the frieze to “the city and the world monument to which it rightfully belongs” to no avail.

Hermann Nitsch, photographed by Philipp Schuster, 2017

Hermann Nitsch dies

The provocative Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch passed away at the age of 83 on18th April following an unspecified illness. The founding member of the controversial Viennese Actionism movement, an exhibition on his work curated by Zuecca Projects and Helmut Essl titled Hermann Nitsch’s 20th Painting Action opened in Venice on the day he died to coincide with the opening of the Venice Biennale. While his work, particularly the series of performances pieces Orgies Mysteries Theatre, was often the target of controversy for his use of blood, viscera and animal carcases, Nitsch maintain that his aim was never simply to shock, but to portray an intensity reflecting that of ancient tragedy, Shakespeare and Vagner. This intensity, he wrote, was a response to his birth and early life in Austria under Nazi rule which left his a staunch opponent of fascism and nationalism in all its forms. Speaking about Nitsch’s death, Helmut Essl said that he hoped his Venice exhibition would “bring his art even closer to the world”.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
29/04/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We take a look at some of the biggest stories in the art world over the past month

Simone Leigh with her Golden Lion, courtesy of Venice Biennale

Golden Lion Winners at the Venice Biennale

The Golden Lions - the top awards at the Venice Biennale - were this year awarded to Simon Leigh and Sonia Boyce, marking the first time that both honours have been awarded to black women. Representing the United States, Leigh won the prize in recognition of her 16-foot sculpture Brick House, depicting a building-like structure combined with the form of an eyeless black female figure. Boyce, meanwhile, won for the British pavilion, with her installation similarly focusing on black women; in this case their often unsung contribution to the country’s musical history, reflecting her own initial rise within the 1980s Black British Arts movement. Other awards presented at the Biennale included the Silver Lion, awarded to Lebanese artist Ali Cherri for his video installation Of Men and Gods and Mud, as well as Lifetime Achievement Awards given to Cecilia Vicuña and Katharina Fritsch, both of whom were also featured in the main show.

Exterior of Tate Liverpool

Turner Prize Nominees Announced

The nominees of this year’s Turner Prize - one of the country’s most prestigious art awards - have been announced, with Heather Phillipson, Ingrid Pollard, Veronica Ryan and Sin Wai Kin all up for the prize. The announcement comes as a somewhat more traditional one following last year’s reveal that all the nominees were collectives rather than individual artists, though there is still room for controversy; the nominees of the 2019 award, for instance, shared the cash prize amongst themselves, while in 2020 the award was abandoned altogether in favour of giving out grants. An exhibition of the nominees’ works will take place at the Tate Liverpool, with the eventual winner of the prize being awarded £25,000, and runners-up receiving £10,000.

Oba Head Africa, West Africa, Nigeria, Edo State, Benin (19th century)

Glasgow Returns Benin Bronzes

Following the repatriation of artefacts looted in the colonial era across the world, politicians in Glasgow have voted to return 17 Benin Bronzes held by the city. The move follows a wave of museums across the world working to repatriate art and artefacts belonging to other nations, kick-started by Germany’s commitment to returning all their Benin Bronzes starting this year, with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art quickly following suit. The Benin Bronzes is the name given to the collection of objects looted by British troops from the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, which were subsequently sold off to other nations. Upon their return, the Bronzes are expected to be displayed in the Edo Museum of West African Art in Benin City, Nigeria, currently under construction. The decision also comes months after the resurgence of debate concerning the British Museum’s ownership of the Parthenon Marbles, with Greek prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis imploring Boris Johnson to return the frieze to “the city and the world monument to which it rightfully belongs” to no avail.

Hermann Nitsch, photographed by Philipp Schuster, 2017

Hermann Nitsch dies

The provocative Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch passed away at the age of 83 on18th April following an unspecified illness. The founding member of the controversial Viennese Actionism movement, an exhibition on his work curated by Zuecca Projects and Helmut Essl titled Hermann Nitsch’s 20th Painting Action opened in Venice on the day he died to coincide with the opening of the Venice Biennale. While his work, particularly the series of performances pieces Orgies Mysteries Theatre, was often the target of controversy for his use of blood, viscera and animal carcases, Nitsch maintain that his aim was never simply to shock, but to portray an intensity reflecting that of ancient tragedy, Shakespeare and Vagner. This intensity, he wrote, was a response to his birth and early life in Austria under Nazi rule which left his a staunch opponent of fascism and nationalism in all its forms. Speaking about Nitsch’s death, Helmut Essl said that he hoped his Venice exhibition would “bring his art even closer to the world”.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
29/04/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We take a look at some of the biggest stories in the art world over the past month

Simone Leigh with her Golden Lion, courtesy of Venice Biennale

Golden Lion Winners at the Venice Biennale

The Golden Lions - the top awards at the Venice Biennale - were this year awarded to Simon Leigh and Sonia Boyce, marking the first time that both honours have been awarded to black women. Representing the United States, Leigh won the prize in recognition of her 16-foot sculpture Brick House, depicting a building-like structure combined with the form of an eyeless black female figure. Boyce, meanwhile, won for the British pavilion, with her installation similarly focusing on black women; in this case their often unsung contribution to the country’s musical history, reflecting her own initial rise within the 1980s Black British Arts movement. Other awards presented at the Biennale included the Silver Lion, awarded to Lebanese artist Ali Cherri for his video installation Of Men and Gods and Mud, as well as Lifetime Achievement Awards given to Cecilia Vicuña and Katharina Fritsch, both of whom were also featured in the main show.

Exterior of Tate Liverpool

Turner Prize Nominees Announced

The nominees of this year’s Turner Prize - one of the country’s most prestigious art awards - have been announced, with Heather Phillipson, Ingrid Pollard, Veronica Ryan and Sin Wai Kin all up for the prize. The announcement comes as a somewhat more traditional one following last year’s reveal that all the nominees were collectives rather than individual artists, though there is still room for controversy; the nominees of the 2019 award, for instance, shared the cash prize amongst themselves, while in 2020 the award was abandoned altogether in favour of giving out grants. An exhibition of the nominees’ works will take place at the Tate Liverpool, with the eventual winner of the prize being awarded £25,000, and runners-up receiving £10,000.

Oba Head Africa, West Africa, Nigeria, Edo State, Benin (19th century)

Glasgow Returns Benin Bronzes

Following the repatriation of artefacts looted in the colonial era across the world, politicians in Glasgow have voted to return 17 Benin Bronzes held by the city. The move follows a wave of museums across the world working to repatriate art and artefacts belonging to other nations, kick-started by Germany’s commitment to returning all their Benin Bronzes starting this year, with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art quickly following suit. The Benin Bronzes is the name given to the collection of objects looted by British troops from the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, which were subsequently sold off to other nations. Upon their return, the Bronzes are expected to be displayed in the Edo Museum of West African Art in Benin City, Nigeria, currently under construction. The decision also comes months after the resurgence of debate concerning the British Museum’s ownership of the Parthenon Marbles, with Greek prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis imploring Boris Johnson to return the frieze to “the city and the world monument to which it rightfully belongs” to no avail.

Hermann Nitsch, photographed by Philipp Schuster, 2017

Hermann Nitsch dies

The provocative Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch passed away at the age of 83 on18th April following an unspecified illness. The founding member of the controversial Viennese Actionism movement, an exhibition on his work curated by Zuecca Projects and Helmut Essl titled Hermann Nitsch’s 20th Painting Action opened in Venice on the day he died to coincide with the opening of the Venice Biennale. While his work, particularly the series of performances pieces Orgies Mysteries Theatre, was often the target of controversy for his use of blood, viscera and animal carcases, Nitsch maintain that his aim was never simply to shock, but to portray an intensity reflecting that of ancient tragedy, Shakespeare and Vagner. This intensity, he wrote, was a response to his birth and early life in Austria under Nazi rule which left his a staunch opponent of fascism and nationalism in all its forms. Speaking about Nitsch’s death, Helmut Essl said that he hoped his Venice exhibition would “bring his art even closer to the world”.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
29/04/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up

Simone Leigh with her Golden Lion, courtesy of Venice Biennale

Golden Lion Winners at the Venice Biennale

The Golden Lions - the top awards at the Venice Biennale - were this year awarded to Simon Leigh and Sonia Boyce, marking the first time that both honours have been awarded to black women. Representing the United States, Leigh won the prize in recognition of her 16-foot sculpture Brick House, depicting a building-like structure combined with the form of an eyeless black female figure. Boyce, meanwhile, won for the British pavilion, with her installation similarly focusing on black women; in this case their often unsung contribution to the country’s musical history, reflecting her own initial rise within the 1980s Black British Arts movement. Other awards presented at the Biennale included the Silver Lion, awarded to Lebanese artist Ali Cherri for his video installation Of Men and Gods and Mud, as well as Lifetime Achievement Awards given to Cecilia Vicuña and Katharina Fritsch, both of whom were also featured in the main show.

Exterior of Tate Liverpool

Turner Prize Nominees Announced

The nominees of this year’s Turner Prize - one of the country’s most prestigious art awards - have been announced, with Heather Phillipson, Ingrid Pollard, Veronica Ryan and Sin Wai Kin all up for the prize. The announcement comes as a somewhat more traditional one following last year’s reveal that all the nominees were collectives rather than individual artists, though there is still room for controversy; the nominees of the 2019 award, for instance, shared the cash prize amongst themselves, while in 2020 the award was abandoned altogether in favour of giving out grants. An exhibition of the nominees’ works will take place at the Tate Liverpool, with the eventual winner of the prize being awarded £25,000, and runners-up receiving £10,000.

Oba Head Africa, West Africa, Nigeria, Edo State, Benin (19th century)

Glasgow Returns Benin Bronzes

Following the repatriation of artefacts looted in the colonial era across the world, politicians in Glasgow have voted to return 17 Benin Bronzes held by the city. The move follows a wave of museums across the world working to repatriate art and artefacts belonging to other nations, kick-started by Germany’s commitment to returning all their Benin Bronzes starting this year, with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art quickly following suit. The Benin Bronzes is the name given to the collection of objects looted by British troops from the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, which were subsequently sold off to other nations. Upon their return, the Bronzes are expected to be displayed in the Edo Museum of West African Art in Benin City, Nigeria, currently under construction. The decision also comes months after the resurgence of debate concerning the British Museum’s ownership of the Parthenon Marbles, with Greek prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis imploring Boris Johnson to return the frieze to “the city and the world monument to which it rightfully belongs” to no avail.

Hermann Nitsch, photographed by Philipp Schuster, 2017

Hermann Nitsch dies

The provocative Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch passed away at the age of 83 on18th April following an unspecified illness. The founding member of the controversial Viennese Actionism movement, an exhibition on his work curated by Zuecca Projects and Helmut Essl titled Hermann Nitsch’s 20th Painting Action opened in Venice on the day he died to coincide with the opening of the Venice Biennale. While his work, particularly the series of performances pieces Orgies Mysteries Theatre, was often the target of controversy for his use of blood, viscera and animal carcases, Nitsch maintain that his aim was never simply to shock, but to portray an intensity reflecting that of ancient tragedy, Shakespeare and Vagner. This intensity, he wrote, was a response to his birth and early life in Austria under Nazi rule which left his a staunch opponent of fascism and nationalism in all its forms. Speaking about Nitsch’s death, Helmut Essl said that he hoped his Venice exhibition would “bring his art even closer to the world”.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
29/04/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We take a look at some of the biggest stories in the art world over the past month

Simone Leigh with her Golden Lion, courtesy of Venice Biennale

Golden Lion Winners at the Venice Biennale

The Golden Lions - the top awards at the Venice Biennale - were this year awarded to Simon Leigh and Sonia Boyce, marking the first time that both honours have been awarded to black women. Representing the United States, Leigh won the prize in recognition of her 16-foot sculpture Brick House, depicting a building-like structure combined with the form of an eyeless black female figure. Boyce, meanwhile, won for the British pavilion, with her installation similarly focusing on black women; in this case their often unsung contribution to the country’s musical history, reflecting her own initial rise within the 1980s Black British Arts movement. Other awards presented at the Biennale included the Silver Lion, awarded to Lebanese artist Ali Cherri for his video installation Of Men and Gods and Mud, as well as Lifetime Achievement Awards given to Cecilia Vicuña and Katharina Fritsch, both of whom were also featured in the main show.

Exterior of Tate Liverpool

Turner Prize Nominees Announced

The nominees of this year’s Turner Prize - one of the country’s most prestigious art awards - have been announced, with Heather Phillipson, Ingrid Pollard, Veronica Ryan and Sin Wai Kin all up for the prize. The announcement comes as a somewhat more traditional one following last year’s reveal that all the nominees were collectives rather than individual artists, though there is still room for controversy; the nominees of the 2019 award, for instance, shared the cash prize amongst themselves, while in 2020 the award was abandoned altogether in favour of giving out grants. An exhibition of the nominees’ works will take place at the Tate Liverpool, with the eventual winner of the prize being awarded £25,000, and runners-up receiving £10,000.

Oba Head Africa, West Africa, Nigeria, Edo State, Benin (19th century)

Glasgow Returns Benin Bronzes

Following the repatriation of artefacts looted in the colonial era across the world, politicians in Glasgow have voted to return 17 Benin Bronzes held by the city. The move follows a wave of museums across the world working to repatriate art and artefacts belonging to other nations, kick-started by Germany’s commitment to returning all their Benin Bronzes starting this year, with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art quickly following suit. The Benin Bronzes is the name given to the collection of objects looted by British troops from the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, which were subsequently sold off to other nations. Upon their return, the Bronzes are expected to be displayed in the Edo Museum of West African Art in Benin City, Nigeria, currently under construction. The decision also comes months after the resurgence of debate concerning the British Museum’s ownership of the Parthenon Marbles, with Greek prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis imploring Boris Johnson to return the frieze to “the city and the world monument to which it rightfully belongs” to no avail.

Hermann Nitsch, photographed by Philipp Schuster, 2017

Hermann Nitsch dies

The provocative Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch passed away at the age of 83 on18th April following an unspecified illness. The founding member of the controversial Viennese Actionism movement, an exhibition on his work curated by Zuecca Projects and Helmut Essl titled Hermann Nitsch’s 20th Painting Action opened in Venice on the day he died to coincide with the opening of the Venice Biennale. While his work, particularly the series of performances pieces Orgies Mysteries Theatre, was often the target of controversy for his use of blood, viscera and animal carcases, Nitsch maintain that his aim was never simply to shock, but to portray an intensity reflecting that of ancient tragedy, Shakespeare and Vagner. This intensity, he wrote, was a response to his birth and early life in Austria under Nazi rule which left his a staunch opponent of fascism and nationalism in all its forms. Speaking about Nitsch’s death, Helmut Essl said that he hoped his Venice exhibition would “bring his art even closer to the world”.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
29/04/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We take a look at some of the biggest stories in the art world over the past month

Simone Leigh with her Golden Lion, courtesy of Venice Biennale

Golden Lion Winners at the Venice Biennale

The Golden Lions - the top awards at the Venice Biennale - were this year awarded to Simon Leigh and Sonia Boyce, marking the first time that both honours have been awarded to black women. Representing the United States, Leigh won the prize in recognition of her 16-foot sculpture Brick House, depicting a building-like structure combined with the form of an eyeless black female figure. Boyce, meanwhile, won for the British pavilion, with her installation similarly focusing on black women; in this case their often unsung contribution to the country’s musical history, reflecting her own initial rise within the 1980s Black British Arts movement. Other awards presented at the Biennale included the Silver Lion, awarded to Lebanese artist Ali Cherri for his video installation Of Men and Gods and Mud, as well as Lifetime Achievement Awards given to Cecilia Vicuña and Katharina Fritsch, both of whom were also featured in the main show.

Exterior of Tate Liverpool

Turner Prize Nominees Announced

The nominees of this year’s Turner Prize - one of the country’s most prestigious art awards - have been announced, with Heather Phillipson, Ingrid Pollard, Veronica Ryan and Sin Wai Kin all up for the prize. The announcement comes as a somewhat more traditional one following last year’s reveal that all the nominees were collectives rather than individual artists, though there is still room for controversy; the nominees of the 2019 award, for instance, shared the cash prize amongst themselves, while in 2020 the award was abandoned altogether in favour of giving out grants. An exhibition of the nominees’ works will take place at the Tate Liverpool, with the eventual winner of the prize being awarded £25,000, and runners-up receiving £10,000.

Oba Head Africa, West Africa, Nigeria, Edo State, Benin (19th century)

Glasgow Returns Benin Bronzes

Following the repatriation of artefacts looted in the colonial era across the world, politicians in Glasgow have voted to return 17 Benin Bronzes held by the city. The move follows a wave of museums across the world working to repatriate art and artefacts belonging to other nations, kick-started by Germany’s commitment to returning all their Benin Bronzes starting this year, with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art quickly following suit. The Benin Bronzes is the name given to the collection of objects looted by British troops from the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, which were subsequently sold off to other nations. Upon their return, the Bronzes are expected to be displayed in the Edo Museum of West African Art in Benin City, Nigeria, currently under construction. The decision also comes months after the resurgence of debate concerning the British Museum’s ownership of the Parthenon Marbles, with Greek prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis imploring Boris Johnson to return the frieze to “the city and the world monument to which it rightfully belongs” to no avail.

Hermann Nitsch, photographed by Philipp Schuster, 2017

Hermann Nitsch dies

The provocative Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch passed away at the age of 83 on18th April following an unspecified illness. The founding member of the controversial Viennese Actionism movement, an exhibition on his work curated by Zuecca Projects and Helmut Essl titled Hermann Nitsch’s 20th Painting Action opened in Venice on the day he died to coincide with the opening of the Venice Biennale. While his work, particularly the series of performances pieces Orgies Mysteries Theatre, was often the target of controversy for his use of blood, viscera and animal carcases, Nitsch maintain that his aim was never simply to shock, but to portray an intensity reflecting that of ancient tragedy, Shakespeare and Vagner. This intensity, he wrote, was a response to his birth and early life in Austria under Nazi rule which left his a staunch opponent of fascism and nationalism in all its forms. Speaking about Nitsch’s death, Helmut Essl said that he hoped his Venice exhibition would “bring his art even closer to the world”.

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
29/04/2022
Art News
Adam Wells
Art News: Monthly Round-Up
We take a look at some of the biggest stories in the art world over the past month

Simone Leigh with her Golden Lion, courtesy of Venice Biennale

Golden Lion Winners at the Venice Biennale

The Golden Lions - the top awards at the Venice Biennale - were this year awarded to Simon Leigh and Sonia Boyce, marking the first time that both honours have been awarded to black women. Representing the United States, Leigh won the prize in recognition of her 16-foot sculpture Brick House, depicting a building-like structure combined with the form of an eyeless black female figure. Boyce, meanwhile, won for the British pavilion, with her installation similarly focusing on black women; in this case their often unsung contribution to the country’s musical history, reflecting her own initial rise within the 1980s Black British Arts movement. Other awards presented at the Biennale included the Silver Lion, awarded to Lebanese artist Ali Cherri for his video installation Of Men and Gods and Mud, as well as Lifetime Achievement Awards given to Cecilia Vicuña and Katharina Fritsch, both of whom were also featured in the main show.

Exterior of Tate Liverpool

Turner Prize Nominees Announced

The nominees of this year’s Turner Prize - one of the country’s most prestigious art awards - have been announced, with Heather Phillipson, Ingrid Pollard, Veronica Ryan and Sin Wai Kin all up for the prize. The announcement comes as a somewhat more traditional one following last year’s reveal that all the nominees were collectives rather than individual artists, though there is still room for controversy; the nominees of the 2019 award, for instance, shared the cash prize amongst themselves, while in 2020 the award was abandoned altogether in favour of giving out grants. An exhibition of the nominees’ works will take place at the Tate Liverpool, with the eventual winner of the prize being awarded £25,000, and runners-up receiving £10,000.

Oba Head Africa, West Africa, Nigeria, Edo State, Benin (19th century)

Glasgow Returns Benin Bronzes

Following the repatriation of artefacts looted in the colonial era across the world, politicians in Glasgow have voted to return 17 Benin Bronzes held by the city. The move follows a wave of museums across the world working to repatriate art and artefacts belonging to other nations, kick-started by Germany’s commitment to returning all their Benin Bronzes starting this year, with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art quickly following suit. The Benin Bronzes is the name given to the collection of objects looted by British troops from the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, which were subsequently sold off to other nations. Upon their return, the Bronzes are expected to be displayed in the Edo Museum of West African Art in Benin City, Nigeria, currently under construction. The decision also comes months after the resurgence of debate concerning the British Museum’s ownership of the Parthenon Marbles, with Greek prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis imploring Boris Johnson to return the frieze to “the city and the world monument to which it rightfully belongs” to no avail.

Hermann Nitsch, photographed by Philipp Schuster, 2017

Hermann Nitsch dies

The provocative Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch passed away at the age of 83 on18th April following an unspecified illness. The founding member of the controversial Viennese Actionism movement, an exhibition on his work curated by Zuecca Projects and Helmut Essl titled Hermann Nitsch’s 20th Painting Action opened in Venice on the day he died to coincide with the opening of the Venice Biennale. While his work, particularly the series of performances pieces Orgies Mysteries Theatre, was often the target of controversy for his use of blood, viscera and animal carcases, Nitsch maintain that his aim was never simply to shock, but to portray an intensity reflecting that of ancient tragedy, Shakespeare and Vagner. This intensity, he wrote, was a response to his birth and early life in Austria under Nazi rule which left his a staunch opponent of fascism and nationalism in all its forms. Speaking about Nitsch’s death, Helmut Essl said that he hoped his Venice exhibition would “bring his art even closer to the world”.

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