31/01/2022
Discussions
Chioma Ince
A Whistle-Stop Tour of Pre-Columbian Ceramics
A whistle-stop tour is a three-part series presented by gowithYamo! We will be taking you on a little tour around the world giving you insight into the history and enriching artefacts, art and collections found in institutions and museums. First stop on our whistle-stop tour is Pre-Columbian ceramics!

What is Pre-Columbian Art?

Pre-Columbian Art is vast in history and rich in culture. The term Pre-Columbian refers to art made in the Americas (North, Central and South) and Caribbean Islands before the colonisation of Christopher Columbus in the 15th century. So, thinking about it, you could refer to it as pre-colonial art or indigenous art, take your pick. The visual arts from this period were very diverse in technique and form which is why for the purpose of this blog we will focus on Pre-Columbian Ceramics.

Techniques and characteristics in pre-Columbian ceramics

There are many different pre-colonial ceramic practices that were used before the invasion of these lands, one being Suazoid pottery, which derives from the Saladoid culture in South America and the West Indies. You can find different types of Saladoid pottery such as Ronquinan and Cedrosan (see images below). Ronquinan Saladoid ceramics may be characterised by their white-on-red painted designs, shallow curved and rectilinear lines, biomorphic adornments and punctate rim pellets (Cruxent and Rouse 1958/1959;Roosevelt 1980; Vargas Arenas 1981). When mapping the migration of this craft we see Cedrosan Saladoid pottery travelled to places in the West Indies like Cedros, Trinidad.

Examples of Ronquinan Saladoid pottery
Examplesof Cedrosan Saladoid Artifactes

In pre-Columbian times, pottery was fired using open fire or pits in the ground instead of kilns. Potters did not use any type of glaze, but they did burnish the surface of their pots with stones. This method of turning pots black or dark grey during the firing process is still used today and is called blackware. Other well-known methods of decoration used in pre-Columbian pottery includes imprinting markings into the clay with textiles, stamps, shells and sharp tools.

Pre-Columbian FiguralBlackware Vessel, Peru, Chimu orMochica, 1200-1500

Museums with big collections of pre-Columbian art

If you are looking for Museums to visit that have strong collections of pre-Columbian art here are a few recommendations:

1.     The British Museum, London

2.     Museo Nacional de Anthopología, Mexico City, Mexico

3.     Museo del Oro, Bogotá,Columbia

4.     The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, U.SA

5.     Art Institute of Chicago,U.SA

Hope you enjoyed the tour!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
31/01/2022
Discussions
Chioma Ince
A Whistle-Stop Tour of Pre-Columbian Ceramics
A whistle-stop tour is a three-part series presented by gowithYamo! We will be taking you on a little tour around the world giving you insight into the history and enriching artefacts, art and collections found in institutions and museums. First stop on our whistle-stop tour is Pre-Columbian ceramics!

What is Pre-Columbian Art?

Pre-Columbian Art is vast in history and rich in culture. The term Pre-Columbian refers to art made in the Americas (North, Central and South) and Caribbean Islands before the colonisation of Christopher Columbus in the 15th century. So, thinking about it, you could refer to it as pre-colonial art or indigenous art, take your pick. The visual arts from this period were very diverse in technique and form which is why for the purpose of this blog we will focus on Pre-Columbian Ceramics.

Techniques and characteristics in pre-Columbian ceramics

There are many different pre-colonial ceramic practices that were used before the invasion of these lands, one being Suazoid pottery, which derives from the Saladoid culture in South America and the West Indies. You can find different types of Saladoid pottery such as Ronquinan and Cedrosan (see images below). Ronquinan Saladoid ceramics may be characterised by their white-on-red painted designs, shallow curved and rectilinear lines, biomorphic adornments and punctate rim pellets (Cruxent and Rouse 1958/1959;Roosevelt 1980; Vargas Arenas 1981). When mapping the migration of this craft we see Cedrosan Saladoid pottery travelled to places in the West Indies like Cedros, Trinidad.

Examples of Ronquinan Saladoid pottery
Examplesof Cedrosan Saladoid Artifactes

In pre-Columbian times, pottery was fired using open fire or pits in the ground instead of kilns. Potters did not use any type of glaze, but they did burnish the surface of their pots with stones. This method of turning pots black or dark grey during the firing process is still used today and is called blackware. Other well-known methods of decoration used in pre-Columbian pottery includes imprinting markings into the clay with textiles, stamps, shells and sharp tools.

Pre-Columbian FiguralBlackware Vessel, Peru, Chimu orMochica, 1200-1500

Museums with big collections of pre-Columbian art

If you are looking for Museums to visit that have strong collections of pre-Columbian art here are a few recommendations:

1.     The British Museum, London

2.     Museo Nacional de Anthopología, Mexico City, Mexico

3.     Museo del Oro, Bogotá,Columbia

4.     The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, U.SA

5.     Art Institute of Chicago,U.SA

Hope you enjoyed the tour!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
31/01/2022
Discussions
Chioma Ince
A Whistle-Stop Tour of Pre-Columbian Ceramics
A whistle-stop tour is a three-part series presented by gowithYamo! We will be taking you on a little tour around the world giving you insight into the history and enriching artefacts, art and collections found in institutions and museums. First stop on our whistle-stop tour is Pre-Columbian ceramics!

What is Pre-Columbian Art?

Pre-Columbian Art is vast in history and rich in culture. The term Pre-Columbian refers to art made in the Americas (North, Central and South) and Caribbean Islands before the colonisation of Christopher Columbus in the 15th century. So, thinking about it, you could refer to it as pre-colonial art or indigenous art, take your pick. The visual arts from this period were very diverse in technique and form which is why for the purpose of this blog we will focus on Pre-Columbian Ceramics.

Techniques and characteristics in pre-Columbian ceramics

There are many different pre-colonial ceramic practices that were used before the invasion of these lands, one being Suazoid pottery, which derives from the Saladoid culture in South America and the West Indies. You can find different types of Saladoid pottery such as Ronquinan and Cedrosan (see images below). Ronquinan Saladoid ceramics may be characterised by their white-on-red painted designs, shallow curved and rectilinear lines, biomorphic adornments and punctate rim pellets (Cruxent and Rouse 1958/1959;Roosevelt 1980; Vargas Arenas 1981). When mapping the migration of this craft we see Cedrosan Saladoid pottery travelled to places in the West Indies like Cedros, Trinidad.

Examples of Ronquinan Saladoid pottery
Examplesof Cedrosan Saladoid Artifactes

In pre-Columbian times, pottery was fired using open fire or pits in the ground instead of kilns. Potters did not use any type of glaze, but they did burnish the surface of their pots with stones. This method of turning pots black or dark grey during the firing process is still used today and is called blackware. Other well-known methods of decoration used in pre-Columbian pottery includes imprinting markings into the clay with textiles, stamps, shells and sharp tools.

Pre-Columbian FiguralBlackware Vessel, Peru, Chimu orMochica, 1200-1500

Museums with big collections of pre-Columbian art

If you are looking for Museums to visit that have strong collections of pre-Columbian art here are a few recommendations:

1.     The British Museum, London

2.     Museo Nacional de Anthopología, Mexico City, Mexico

3.     Museo del Oro, Bogotá,Columbia

4.     The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, U.SA

5.     Art Institute of Chicago,U.SA

Hope you enjoyed the tour!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
31/01/2022
Discussions
Chioma Ince
A Whistle-Stop Tour of Pre-Columbian Ceramics
A whistle-stop tour is a three-part series presented by gowithYamo! We will be taking you on a little tour around the world giving you insight into the history and enriching artefacts, art and collections found in institutions and museums. First stop on our whistle-stop tour is Pre-Columbian ceramics!

What is Pre-Columbian Art?

Pre-Columbian Art is vast in history and rich in culture. The term Pre-Columbian refers to art made in the Americas (North, Central and South) and Caribbean Islands before the colonisation of Christopher Columbus in the 15th century. So, thinking about it, you could refer to it as pre-colonial art or indigenous art, take your pick. The visual arts from this period were very diverse in technique and form which is why for the purpose of this blog we will focus on Pre-Columbian Ceramics.

Techniques and characteristics in pre-Columbian ceramics

There are many different pre-colonial ceramic practices that were used before the invasion of these lands, one being Suazoid pottery, which derives from the Saladoid culture in South America and the West Indies. You can find different types of Saladoid pottery such as Ronquinan and Cedrosan (see images below). Ronquinan Saladoid ceramics may be characterised by their white-on-red painted designs, shallow curved and rectilinear lines, biomorphic adornments and punctate rim pellets (Cruxent and Rouse 1958/1959;Roosevelt 1980; Vargas Arenas 1981). When mapping the migration of this craft we see Cedrosan Saladoid pottery travelled to places in the West Indies like Cedros, Trinidad.

Examples of Ronquinan Saladoid pottery
Examplesof Cedrosan Saladoid Artifactes

In pre-Columbian times, pottery was fired using open fire or pits in the ground instead of kilns. Potters did not use any type of glaze, but they did burnish the surface of their pots with stones. This method of turning pots black or dark grey during the firing process is still used today and is called blackware. Other well-known methods of decoration used in pre-Columbian pottery includes imprinting markings into the clay with textiles, stamps, shells and sharp tools.

Pre-Columbian FiguralBlackware Vessel, Peru, Chimu orMochica, 1200-1500

Museums with big collections of pre-Columbian art

If you are looking for Museums to visit that have strong collections of pre-Columbian art here are a few recommendations:

1.     The British Museum, London

2.     Museo Nacional de Anthopología, Mexico City, Mexico

3.     Museo del Oro, Bogotá,Columbia

4.     The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, U.SA

5.     Art Institute of Chicago,U.SA

Hope you enjoyed the tour!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
31/01/2022
Discussions
Chioma Ince
A Whistle-Stop Tour of Pre-Columbian Ceramics
A whistle-stop tour is a three-part series presented by gowithYamo! We will be taking you on a little tour around the world giving you insight into the history and enriching artefacts, art and collections found in institutions and museums. First stop on our whistle-stop tour is Pre-Columbian ceramics!

What is Pre-Columbian Art?

Pre-Columbian Art is vast in history and rich in culture. The term Pre-Columbian refers to art made in the Americas (North, Central and South) and Caribbean Islands before the colonisation of Christopher Columbus in the 15th century. So, thinking about it, you could refer to it as pre-colonial art or indigenous art, take your pick. The visual arts from this period were very diverse in technique and form which is why for the purpose of this blog we will focus on Pre-Columbian Ceramics.

Techniques and characteristics in pre-Columbian ceramics

There are many different pre-colonial ceramic practices that were used before the invasion of these lands, one being Suazoid pottery, which derives from the Saladoid culture in South America and the West Indies. You can find different types of Saladoid pottery such as Ronquinan and Cedrosan (see images below). Ronquinan Saladoid ceramics may be characterised by their white-on-red painted designs, shallow curved and rectilinear lines, biomorphic adornments and punctate rim pellets (Cruxent and Rouse 1958/1959;Roosevelt 1980; Vargas Arenas 1981). When mapping the migration of this craft we see Cedrosan Saladoid pottery travelled to places in the West Indies like Cedros, Trinidad.

Examples of Ronquinan Saladoid pottery
Examplesof Cedrosan Saladoid Artifactes

In pre-Columbian times, pottery was fired using open fire or pits in the ground instead of kilns. Potters did not use any type of glaze, but they did burnish the surface of their pots with stones. This method of turning pots black or dark grey during the firing process is still used today and is called blackware. Other well-known methods of decoration used in pre-Columbian pottery includes imprinting markings into the clay with textiles, stamps, shells and sharp tools.

Pre-Columbian FiguralBlackware Vessel, Peru, Chimu orMochica, 1200-1500

Museums with big collections of pre-Columbian art

If you are looking for Museums to visit that have strong collections of pre-Columbian art here are a few recommendations:

1.     The British Museum, London

2.     Museo Nacional de Anthopología, Mexico City, Mexico

3.     Museo del Oro, Bogotá,Columbia

4.     The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, U.SA

5.     Art Institute of Chicago,U.SA

Hope you enjoyed the tour!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
31/01/2022
Discussions
Chioma Ince
A Whistle-Stop Tour of Pre-Columbian Ceramics

What is Pre-Columbian Art?

Pre-Columbian Art is vast in history and rich in culture. The term Pre-Columbian refers to art made in the Americas (North, Central and South) and Caribbean Islands before the colonisation of Christopher Columbus in the 15th century. So, thinking about it, you could refer to it as pre-colonial art or indigenous art, take your pick. The visual arts from this period were very diverse in technique and form which is why for the purpose of this blog we will focus on Pre-Columbian Ceramics.

Techniques and characteristics in pre-Columbian ceramics

There are many different pre-colonial ceramic practices that were used before the invasion of these lands, one being Suazoid pottery, which derives from the Saladoid culture in South America and the West Indies. You can find different types of Saladoid pottery such as Ronquinan and Cedrosan (see images below). Ronquinan Saladoid ceramics may be characterised by their white-on-red painted designs, shallow curved and rectilinear lines, biomorphic adornments and punctate rim pellets (Cruxent and Rouse 1958/1959;Roosevelt 1980; Vargas Arenas 1981). When mapping the migration of this craft we see Cedrosan Saladoid pottery travelled to places in the West Indies like Cedros, Trinidad.

Examples of Ronquinan Saladoid pottery
Examplesof Cedrosan Saladoid Artifactes

In pre-Columbian times, pottery was fired using open fire or pits in the ground instead of kilns. Potters did not use any type of glaze, but they did burnish the surface of their pots with stones. This method of turning pots black or dark grey during the firing process is still used today and is called blackware. Other well-known methods of decoration used in pre-Columbian pottery includes imprinting markings into the clay with textiles, stamps, shells and sharp tools.

Pre-Columbian FiguralBlackware Vessel, Peru, Chimu orMochica, 1200-1500

Museums with big collections of pre-Columbian art

If you are looking for Museums to visit that have strong collections of pre-Columbian art here are a few recommendations:

1.     The British Museum, London

2.     Museo Nacional de Anthopología, Mexico City, Mexico

3.     Museo del Oro, Bogotá,Columbia

4.     The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, U.SA

5.     Art Institute of Chicago,U.SA

Hope you enjoyed the tour!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
31/01/2022
Discussions
Chioma Ince
A Whistle-Stop Tour of Pre-Columbian Ceramics
A whistle-stop tour is a three-part series presented by gowithYamo! We will be taking you on a little tour around the world giving you insight into the history and enriching artefacts, art and collections found in institutions and museums. First stop on our whistle-stop tour is Pre-Columbian ceramics!

What is Pre-Columbian Art?

Pre-Columbian Art is vast in history and rich in culture. The term Pre-Columbian refers to art made in the Americas (North, Central and South) and Caribbean Islands before the colonisation of Christopher Columbus in the 15th century. So, thinking about it, you could refer to it as pre-colonial art or indigenous art, take your pick. The visual arts from this period were very diverse in technique and form which is why for the purpose of this blog we will focus on Pre-Columbian Ceramics.

Techniques and characteristics in pre-Columbian ceramics

There are many different pre-colonial ceramic practices that were used before the invasion of these lands, one being Suazoid pottery, which derives from the Saladoid culture in South America and the West Indies. You can find different types of Saladoid pottery such as Ronquinan and Cedrosan (see images below). Ronquinan Saladoid ceramics may be characterised by their white-on-red painted designs, shallow curved and rectilinear lines, biomorphic adornments and punctate rim pellets (Cruxent and Rouse 1958/1959;Roosevelt 1980; Vargas Arenas 1981). When mapping the migration of this craft we see Cedrosan Saladoid pottery travelled to places in the West Indies like Cedros, Trinidad.

Examples of Ronquinan Saladoid pottery
Examplesof Cedrosan Saladoid Artifactes

In pre-Columbian times, pottery was fired using open fire or pits in the ground instead of kilns. Potters did not use any type of glaze, but they did burnish the surface of their pots with stones. This method of turning pots black or dark grey during the firing process is still used today and is called blackware. Other well-known methods of decoration used in pre-Columbian pottery includes imprinting markings into the clay with textiles, stamps, shells and sharp tools.

Pre-Columbian FiguralBlackware Vessel, Peru, Chimu orMochica, 1200-1500

Museums with big collections of pre-Columbian art

If you are looking for Museums to visit that have strong collections of pre-Columbian art here are a few recommendations:

1.     The British Museum, London

2.     Museo Nacional de Anthopología, Mexico City, Mexico

3.     Museo del Oro, Bogotá,Columbia

4.     The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, U.SA

5.     Art Institute of Chicago,U.SA

Hope you enjoyed the tour!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
31/01/2022
Discussions
Chioma Ince
A Whistle-Stop Tour of Pre-Columbian Ceramics
A whistle-stop tour is a three-part series presented by gowithYamo! We will be taking you on a little tour around the world giving you insight into the history and enriching artefacts, art and collections found in institutions and museums. First stop on our whistle-stop tour is Pre-Columbian ceramics!

What is Pre-Columbian Art?

Pre-Columbian Art is vast in history and rich in culture. The term Pre-Columbian refers to art made in the Americas (North, Central and South) and Caribbean Islands before the colonisation of Christopher Columbus in the 15th century. So, thinking about it, you could refer to it as pre-colonial art or indigenous art, take your pick. The visual arts from this period were very diverse in technique and form which is why for the purpose of this blog we will focus on Pre-Columbian Ceramics.

Techniques and characteristics in pre-Columbian ceramics

There are many different pre-colonial ceramic practices that were used before the invasion of these lands, one being Suazoid pottery, which derives from the Saladoid culture in South America and the West Indies. You can find different types of Saladoid pottery such as Ronquinan and Cedrosan (see images below). Ronquinan Saladoid ceramics may be characterised by their white-on-red painted designs, shallow curved and rectilinear lines, biomorphic adornments and punctate rim pellets (Cruxent and Rouse 1958/1959;Roosevelt 1980; Vargas Arenas 1981). When mapping the migration of this craft we see Cedrosan Saladoid pottery travelled to places in the West Indies like Cedros, Trinidad.

Examples of Ronquinan Saladoid pottery
Examplesof Cedrosan Saladoid Artifactes

In pre-Columbian times, pottery was fired using open fire or pits in the ground instead of kilns. Potters did not use any type of glaze, but they did burnish the surface of their pots with stones. This method of turning pots black or dark grey during the firing process is still used today and is called blackware. Other well-known methods of decoration used in pre-Columbian pottery includes imprinting markings into the clay with textiles, stamps, shells and sharp tools.

Pre-Columbian FiguralBlackware Vessel, Peru, Chimu orMochica, 1200-1500

Museums with big collections of pre-Columbian art

If you are looking for Museums to visit that have strong collections of pre-Columbian art here are a few recommendations:

1.     The British Museum, London

2.     Museo Nacional de Anthopología, Mexico City, Mexico

3.     Museo del Oro, Bogotá,Columbia

4.     The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, U.SA

5.     Art Institute of Chicago,U.SA

Hope you enjoyed the tour!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
31/01/2022
Discussions
Chioma Ince
A Whistle-Stop Tour of Pre-Columbian Ceramics
A whistle-stop tour is a three-part series presented by gowithYamo! We will be taking you on a little tour around the world giving you insight into the history and enriching artefacts, art and collections found in institutions and museums. First stop on our whistle-stop tour is Pre-Columbian ceramics!

What is Pre-Columbian Art?

Pre-Columbian Art is vast in history and rich in culture. The term Pre-Columbian refers to art made in the Americas (North, Central and South) and Caribbean Islands before the colonisation of Christopher Columbus in the 15th century. So, thinking about it, you could refer to it as pre-colonial art or indigenous art, take your pick. The visual arts from this period were very diverse in technique and form which is why for the purpose of this blog we will focus on Pre-Columbian Ceramics.

Techniques and characteristics in pre-Columbian ceramics

There are many different pre-colonial ceramic practices that were used before the invasion of these lands, one being Suazoid pottery, which derives from the Saladoid culture in South America and the West Indies. You can find different types of Saladoid pottery such as Ronquinan and Cedrosan (see images below). Ronquinan Saladoid ceramics may be characterised by their white-on-red painted designs, shallow curved and rectilinear lines, biomorphic adornments and punctate rim pellets (Cruxent and Rouse 1958/1959;Roosevelt 1980; Vargas Arenas 1981). When mapping the migration of this craft we see Cedrosan Saladoid pottery travelled to places in the West Indies like Cedros, Trinidad.

Examples of Ronquinan Saladoid pottery
Examplesof Cedrosan Saladoid Artifactes

In pre-Columbian times, pottery was fired using open fire or pits in the ground instead of kilns. Potters did not use any type of glaze, but they did burnish the surface of their pots with stones. This method of turning pots black or dark grey during the firing process is still used today and is called blackware. Other well-known methods of decoration used in pre-Columbian pottery includes imprinting markings into the clay with textiles, stamps, shells and sharp tools.

Pre-Columbian FiguralBlackware Vessel, Peru, Chimu orMochica, 1200-1500

Museums with big collections of pre-Columbian art

If you are looking for Museums to visit that have strong collections of pre-Columbian art here are a few recommendations:

1.     The British Museum, London

2.     Museo Nacional de Anthopología, Mexico City, Mexico

3.     Museo del Oro, Bogotá,Columbia

4.     The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, U.SA

5.     Art Institute of Chicago,U.SA

Hope you enjoyed the tour!

Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
Thanks For Reading
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.