22/07/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
How Art Can Ease Our Return to Normal
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.

This week at midnight on Monday morning, we saw the beginning of ‘Freedom Week’ and the end of restrictions. Queues were lining the streets so that party goers could enter night clubs for the first time since the pandemic began. Many of us have been desperate to return to our pre-covid routines, however, after a year of being constantly reminded that people outside of our bubbles pose threat and danger, is it any wonder that we feel post-pandemic anxiety at the prospect of a thriving and bustling social scene?!

How can art ease you back into the swing of things?

Engaging in the arts is a powerful, yet gentle, way to ease back into things. It is being recognised more and more that art is a fantastic way to improve your mental well-being and that being creative can boost your barriers against psychological distress by gifting you the tools to express yourself through other methods (rather than just your words). It can be hard to communicate with other beings how we are truly feeling, especially when the past few months we have only communicated with a limited number of people. Whether you choose to create or simply observe, art is a relaxing and inspiring activity for many.


Go to an Art Gallery
It is not just the act of creating and observing art that is important and beneficial to our mental health, but the context in which we observe it. Have you noticed that when you walk into a museum, there is an immediate sense of peace and tranquillity? There is no city noise here, and a quiet lull welcomes you at the door. Observers pace the gallery rooms speaking in hushed tones… or not at all. Museums and galleries immediately create oases in the hubbub of cities, providing refuge from a fast-paced life or a tiresome day.

If the last year has taught us anything, it is that we are social animals who thrive in the company of our dearest and nearest, and isolation is no friend of ours. Although, it may seem daunting, our human nature wants us to return to the pre-pandemic social connectedness. We suggest that if you are feeling anxious this side of the pandemic, perhaps opting for an afternoon art gallery with your friends over sinking pints in the pub, is the more gentle way to return to the post-covid world.

If you’re stuck as to where to go and what to see check out our top exhibitions to see in London now!


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
22/07/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
How Art Can Ease Our Return to Normal
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.

This week at midnight on Monday morning, we saw the beginning of ‘Freedom Week’ and the end of restrictions. Queues were lining the streets so that party goers could enter night clubs for the first time since the pandemic began. Many of us have been desperate to return to our pre-covid routines, however, after a year of being constantly reminded that people outside of our bubbles pose threat and danger, is it any wonder that we feel post-pandemic anxiety at the prospect of a thriving and bustling social scene?!

How can art ease you back into the swing of things?

Engaging in the arts is a powerful, yet gentle, way to ease back into things. It is being recognised more and more that art is a fantastic way to improve your mental well-being and that being creative can boost your barriers against psychological distress by gifting you the tools to express yourself through other methods (rather than just your words). It can be hard to communicate with other beings how we are truly feeling, especially when the past few months we have only communicated with a limited number of people. Whether you choose to create or simply observe, art is a relaxing and inspiring activity for many.


Go to an Art Gallery
It is not just the act of creating and observing art that is important and beneficial to our mental health, but the context in which we observe it. Have you noticed that when you walk into a museum, there is an immediate sense of peace and tranquillity? There is no city noise here, and a quiet lull welcomes you at the door. Observers pace the gallery rooms speaking in hushed tones… or not at all. Museums and galleries immediately create oases in the hubbub of cities, providing refuge from a fast-paced life or a tiresome day.

If the last year has taught us anything, it is that we are social animals who thrive in the company of our dearest and nearest, and isolation is no friend of ours. Although, it may seem daunting, our human nature wants us to return to the pre-pandemic social connectedness. We suggest that if you are feeling anxious this side of the pandemic, perhaps opting for an afternoon art gallery with your friends over sinking pints in the pub, is the more gentle way to return to the post-covid world.

If you’re stuck as to where to go and what to see check out our top exhibitions to see in London now!


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
22/07/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
How Art Can Ease Our Return to Normal
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.

This week at midnight on Monday morning, we saw the beginning of ‘Freedom Week’ and the end of restrictions. Queues were lining the streets so that party goers could enter night clubs for the first time since the pandemic began. Many of us have been desperate to return to our pre-covid routines, however, after a year of being constantly reminded that people outside of our bubbles pose threat and danger, is it any wonder that we feel post-pandemic anxiety at the prospect of a thriving and bustling social scene?!

How can art ease you back into the swing of things?

Engaging in the arts is a powerful, yet gentle, way to ease back into things. It is being recognised more and more that art is a fantastic way to improve your mental well-being and that being creative can boost your barriers against psychological distress by gifting you the tools to express yourself through other methods (rather than just your words). It can be hard to communicate with other beings how we are truly feeling, especially when the past few months we have only communicated with a limited number of people. Whether you choose to create or simply observe, art is a relaxing and inspiring activity for many.


Go to an Art Gallery
It is not just the act of creating and observing art that is important and beneficial to our mental health, but the context in which we observe it. Have you noticed that when you walk into a museum, there is an immediate sense of peace and tranquillity? There is no city noise here, and a quiet lull welcomes you at the door. Observers pace the gallery rooms speaking in hushed tones… or not at all. Museums and galleries immediately create oases in the hubbub of cities, providing refuge from a fast-paced life or a tiresome day.

If the last year has taught us anything, it is that we are social animals who thrive in the company of our dearest and nearest, and isolation is no friend of ours. Although, it may seem daunting, our human nature wants us to return to the pre-pandemic social connectedness. We suggest that if you are feeling anxious this side of the pandemic, perhaps opting for an afternoon art gallery with your friends over sinking pints in the pub, is the more gentle way to return to the post-covid world.

If you’re stuck as to where to go and what to see check out our top exhibitions to see in London now!


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
22/07/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
How Art Can Ease Our Return to Normal
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.

This week at midnight on Monday morning, we saw the beginning of ‘Freedom Week’ and the end of restrictions. Queues were lining the streets so that party goers could enter night clubs for the first time since the pandemic began. Many of us have been desperate to return to our pre-covid routines, however, after a year of being constantly reminded that people outside of our bubbles pose threat and danger, is it any wonder that we feel post-pandemic anxiety at the prospect of a thriving and bustling social scene?!

How can art ease you back into the swing of things?

Engaging in the arts is a powerful, yet gentle, way to ease back into things. It is being recognised more and more that art is a fantastic way to improve your mental well-being and that being creative can boost your barriers against psychological distress by gifting you the tools to express yourself through other methods (rather than just your words). It can be hard to communicate with other beings how we are truly feeling, especially when the past few months we have only communicated with a limited number of people. Whether you choose to create or simply observe, art is a relaxing and inspiring activity for many.


Go to an Art Gallery
It is not just the act of creating and observing art that is important and beneficial to our mental health, but the context in which we observe it. Have you noticed that when you walk into a museum, there is an immediate sense of peace and tranquillity? There is no city noise here, and a quiet lull welcomes you at the door. Observers pace the gallery rooms speaking in hushed tones… or not at all. Museums and galleries immediately create oases in the hubbub of cities, providing refuge from a fast-paced life or a tiresome day.

If the last year has taught us anything, it is that we are social animals who thrive in the company of our dearest and nearest, and isolation is no friend of ours. Although, it may seem daunting, our human nature wants us to return to the pre-pandemic social connectedness. We suggest that if you are feeling anxious this side of the pandemic, perhaps opting for an afternoon art gallery with your friends over sinking pints in the pub, is the more gentle way to return to the post-covid world.

If you’re stuck as to where to go and what to see check out our top exhibitions to see in London now!


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
22/07/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
How Art Can Ease Our Return to Normal
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.

This week at midnight on Monday morning, we saw the beginning of ‘Freedom Week’ and the end of restrictions. Queues were lining the streets so that party goers could enter night clubs for the first time since the pandemic began. Many of us have been desperate to return to our pre-covid routines, however, after a year of being constantly reminded that people outside of our bubbles pose threat and danger, is it any wonder that we feel post-pandemic anxiety at the prospect of a thriving and bustling social scene?!

How can art ease you back into the swing of things?

Engaging in the arts is a powerful, yet gentle, way to ease back into things. It is being recognised more and more that art is a fantastic way to improve your mental well-being and that being creative can boost your barriers against psychological distress by gifting you the tools to express yourself through other methods (rather than just your words). It can be hard to communicate with other beings how we are truly feeling, especially when the past few months we have only communicated with a limited number of people. Whether you choose to create or simply observe, art is a relaxing and inspiring activity for many.


Go to an Art Gallery
It is not just the act of creating and observing art that is important and beneficial to our mental health, but the context in which we observe it. Have you noticed that when you walk into a museum, there is an immediate sense of peace and tranquillity? There is no city noise here, and a quiet lull welcomes you at the door. Observers pace the gallery rooms speaking in hushed tones… or not at all. Museums and galleries immediately create oases in the hubbub of cities, providing refuge from a fast-paced life or a tiresome day.

If the last year has taught us anything, it is that we are social animals who thrive in the company of our dearest and nearest, and isolation is no friend of ours. Although, it may seem daunting, our human nature wants us to return to the pre-pandemic social connectedness. We suggest that if you are feeling anxious this side of the pandemic, perhaps opting for an afternoon art gallery with your friends over sinking pints in the pub, is the more gentle way to return to the post-covid world.

If you’re stuck as to where to go and what to see check out our top exhibitions to see in London now!


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
22/07/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
How Art Can Ease Our Return to Normal
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.

This week at midnight on Monday morning, we saw the beginning of ‘Freedom Week’ and the end of restrictions. Queues were lining the streets so that party goers could enter night clubs for the first time since the pandemic began. Many of us have been desperate to return to our pre-covid routines, however, after a year of being constantly reminded that people outside of our bubbles pose threat and danger, is it any wonder that we feel post-pandemic anxiety at the prospect of a thriving and bustling social scene?!

How can art ease you back into the swing of things?

Engaging in the arts is a powerful, yet gentle, way to ease back into things. It is being recognised more and more that art is a fantastic way to improve your mental well-being and that being creative can boost your barriers against psychological distress by gifting you the tools to express yourself through other methods (rather than just your words). It can be hard to communicate with other beings how we are truly feeling, especially when the past few months we have only communicated with a limited number of people. Whether you choose to create or simply observe, art is a relaxing and inspiring activity for many.


Go to an Art Gallery
It is not just the act of creating and observing art that is important and beneficial to our mental health, but the context in which we observe it. Have you noticed that when you walk into a museum, there is an immediate sense of peace and tranquillity? There is no city noise here, and a quiet lull welcomes you at the door. Observers pace the gallery rooms speaking in hushed tones… or not at all. Museums and galleries immediately create oases in the hubbub of cities, providing refuge from a fast-paced life or a tiresome day.

If the last year has taught us anything, it is that we are social animals who thrive in the company of our dearest and nearest, and isolation is no friend of ours. Although, it may seem daunting, our human nature wants us to return to the pre-pandemic social connectedness. We suggest that if you are feeling anxious this side of the pandemic, perhaps opting for an afternoon art gallery with your friends over sinking pints in the pub, is the more gentle way to return to the post-covid world.

If you’re stuck as to where to go and what to see check out our top exhibitions to see in London now!


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
22/07/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
How Art Can Ease Our Return to Normal
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.

This week at midnight on Monday morning, we saw the beginning of ‘Freedom Week’ and the end of restrictions. Queues were lining the streets so that party goers could enter night clubs for the first time since the pandemic began. Many of us have been desperate to return to our pre-covid routines, however, after a year of being constantly reminded that people outside of our bubbles pose threat and danger, is it any wonder that we feel post-pandemic anxiety at the prospect of a thriving and bustling social scene?!

How can art ease you back into the swing of things?

Engaging in the arts is a powerful, yet gentle, way to ease back into things. It is being recognised more and more that art is a fantastic way to improve your mental well-being and that being creative can boost your barriers against psychological distress by gifting you the tools to express yourself through other methods (rather than just your words). It can be hard to communicate with other beings how we are truly feeling, especially when the past few months we have only communicated with a limited number of people. Whether you choose to create or simply observe, art is a relaxing and inspiring activity for many.


Go to an Art Gallery
It is not just the act of creating and observing art that is important and beneficial to our mental health, but the context in which we observe it. Have you noticed that when you walk into a museum, there is an immediate sense of peace and tranquillity? There is no city noise here, and a quiet lull welcomes you at the door. Observers pace the gallery rooms speaking in hushed tones… or not at all. Museums and galleries immediately create oases in the hubbub of cities, providing refuge from a fast-paced life or a tiresome day.

If the last year has taught us anything, it is that we are social animals who thrive in the company of our dearest and nearest, and isolation is no friend of ours. Although, it may seem daunting, our human nature wants us to return to the pre-pandemic social connectedness. We suggest that if you are feeling anxious this side of the pandemic, perhaps opting for an afternoon art gallery with your friends over sinking pints in the pub, is the more gentle way to return to the post-covid world.

If you’re stuck as to where to go and what to see check out our top exhibitions to see in London now!


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
22/07/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
How Art Can Ease Our Return to Normal
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.

This week at midnight on Monday morning, we saw the beginning of ‘Freedom Week’ and the end of restrictions. Queues were lining the streets so that party goers could enter night clubs for the first time since the pandemic began. Many of us have been desperate to return to our pre-covid routines, however, after a year of being constantly reminded that people outside of our bubbles pose threat and danger, is it any wonder that we feel post-pandemic anxiety at the prospect of a thriving and bustling social scene?!

How can art ease you back into the swing of things?

Engaging in the arts is a powerful, yet gentle, way to ease back into things. It is being recognised more and more that art is a fantastic way to improve your mental well-being and that being creative can boost your barriers against psychological distress by gifting you the tools to express yourself through other methods (rather than just your words). It can be hard to communicate with other beings how we are truly feeling, especially when the past few months we have only communicated with a limited number of people. Whether you choose to create or simply observe, art is a relaxing and inspiring activity for many.


Go to an Art Gallery
It is not just the act of creating and observing art that is important and beneficial to our mental health, but the context in which we observe it. Have you noticed that when you walk into a museum, there is an immediate sense of peace and tranquillity? There is no city noise here, and a quiet lull welcomes you at the door. Observers pace the gallery rooms speaking in hushed tones… or not at all. Museums and galleries immediately create oases in the hubbub of cities, providing refuge from a fast-paced life or a tiresome day.

If the last year has taught us anything, it is that we are social animals who thrive in the company of our dearest and nearest, and isolation is no friend of ours. Although, it may seem daunting, our human nature wants us to return to the pre-pandemic social connectedness. We suggest that if you are feeling anxious this side of the pandemic, perhaps opting for an afternoon art gallery with your friends over sinking pints in the pub, is the more gentle way to return to the post-covid world.

If you’re stuck as to where to go and what to see check out our top exhibitions to see in London now!


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
22/07/2021
Discussion
Sioned Bryant
How Art Can Ease Our Return to Normal
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.
Sandro Botticelli, Venus and Mars, c 1485. Tempera and oil on poplar panel, 69 cm x 173 cm. National Gallery, London.

This week at midnight on Monday morning, we saw the beginning of ‘Freedom Week’ and the end of restrictions. Queues were lining the streets so that party goers could enter night clubs for the first time since the pandemic began. Many of us have been desperate to return to our pre-covid routines, however, after a year of being constantly reminded that people outside of our bubbles pose threat and danger, is it any wonder that we feel post-pandemic anxiety at the prospect of a thriving and bustling social scene?!

How can art ease you back into the swing of things?

Engaging in the arts is a powerful, yet gentle, way to ease back into things. It is being recognised more and more that art is a fantastic way to improve your mental well-being and that being creative can boost your barriers against psychological distress by gifting you the tools to express yourself through other methods (rather than just your words). It can be hard to communicate with other beings how we are truly feeling, especially when the past few months we have only communicated with a limited number of people. Whether you choose to create or simply observe, art is a relaxing and inspiring activity for many.


Go to an Art Gallery
It is not just the act of creating and observing art that is important and beneficial to our mental health, but the context in which we observe it. Have you noticed that when you walk into a museum, there is an immediate sense of peace and tranquillity? There is no city noise here, and a quiet lull welcomes you at the door. Observers pace the gallery rooms speaking in hushed tones… or not at all. Museums and galleries immediately create oases in the hubbub of cities, providing refuge from a fast-paced life or a tiresome day.

If the last year has taught us anything, it is that we are social animals who thrive in the company of our dearest and nearest, and isolation is no friend of ours. Although, it may seem daunting, our human nature wants us to return to the pre-pandemic social connectedness. We suggest that if you are feeling anxious this side of the pandemic, perhaps opting for an afternoon art gallery with your friends over sinking pints in the pub, is the more gentle way to return to the post-covid world.

If you’re stuck as to where to go and what to see check out our top exhibitions to see in London now!


Thanks for reading
Collect your 5 yamos below
REDEEM YAMOS
Thanks For Reading
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.